Metric

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mm's are confusing enough. dm's are WAY over the top. <G>
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On Wed, 9 Sep 2009 09:55:49 -0700 (PDT), Robatoy

Especially around Easter when they are pastel colored.
Mark
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On 09/08/2009 08:10 PM, Robatoy wrote:

Technically a liter of water isn't _exactly_ 1kg. But it's awfully close.
Chris
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On 9/8/2009 6:27 PM Upscale spake thus:
>

Interesting (that most of your food comes from here); seems like a lot of the food I buy here in the U.S. comes from Canada. I buy most of my food at Traitor Joe's, and it's surprising how much stuff says "product of Canada".
--
Found--the gene that causes belief in genetic determinism

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Well, much of it is true, but maybe not as much as I intimated. I think it depends on the type of food. I notice many of the fruits I eat originate from Florida or California while vegetables and beef often come from somewhere in Canada. Obviously a climate thing. I've also noticed a significant amount of fruits coming from South America. There's a march on to advance home grown foods with the advertising lauding how fresh Canadian produce is because it gets to the dinner table faster because it doesn't have to travel so far to get here. But it seems like there's a whole lot of inter-country food commerce going on when there doesn't really need to be. Maybe it advances trade in other areas where bigger profits are made.
When you see Canadian grown food, is it measured in metric? Your US food comes here in quarts, pints, pounds and ounces.
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DINGDINGDINGDING!!!! YOU are the 200 th caller. Free pints for you at the Duke of Richmond (The next to Old City hall...or..wait, the Duke Of Gloucester on Yonge might be closer.... but that is in an iffy area...
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Extremely close to where I live, but unfortunately it's on the second floor. The first few years here I visited the Pilot Tavern on occasion until they added several steps in the front door. However, if it's that type of pub atmosphere that you're into, I know of several locations nearby that are similar. Or, if you're ok for a dive, there's the Burgundy bar and grill ~ less than five minutes away.
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Van Morrison, The Cult, David Gray are all coming through this fall, I'll be catching a couple of those...so I'll be in touch.
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No matter where is comes from, it is usually sold that way here, with a few expectations for pre-packed stuff.
The big controversy, IMO, comes down to resistance to change. If you fear the change it will be difficult. Travel to another country and you'll be amazed at how you can adapt. I can buy food using Euros per kilo just as easily as dollars per pound. I either learned how or starved for a couple of weeks.
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On 9/9/2009 6:36 PM Upscale spake thus:

Nope; typical packaging. F'rinstance, some crackers I regularly buy: "Wheat Crisps"; 9 oz. (255 g.). Customary units first, pretend units second.
--
Found--the gene that causes belief in genetic determinism

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: Nope; typical packaging. F'rinstance, some crackers I regularly buy: : "Wheat Crisps"; 9 oz. (255 g.). Customary units first, pretend units second. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^
                }:-}
                    -- Andy Barss
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David Nebenzahl wrote:

I've started referring to them as "real people units". As in when someone tells me "that's about 90 cm tall", my response is, "what is that in real-people units?"
--

There is never a situation where having more rounds is a disadvantage

Rob Leatham
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So, the 95% or so of the world's population who would say 90cm are not real people????
Luigi
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Mark & Juanita wrote:

It's about 9 hands.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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Donchya mean "short people units"?
nb
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David Nebenzahl wrote:

I'm seeing a lot of foods marked in decimal pounds, pounds and ounces, and metric. The people who want it in metric only or metric first are as whackadoodle as the Francophone Quebecois who go around measuring signs to make sure that the French is more prominent than the English.
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Now, that's a poor comparison. Metric conversion has only come to the forefront as more and more manufacturing becomes a worldwide concern and largely over the past 50 years. Whereas, Quebec French have always been screwed up. After all, they're French, they're largely anti Canadian and they think strangely. Thank God my father moved our family from Montreal to Toronto when I was eleven and I didn't have to suffer my teenage years through a totally crazy society. Growing up is tough enough. Doing it in Quebec as an English speaking youth is totally whacked.
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What a lot of contributors here at Wreck are missing is the OP's (me) original post. Practically the whole world runs on metric. Why not the USA? Is it because the extreme Right is so nationalistic as to think that they are always right, better, smarter than the rest of the planet? Is it because they're afraid that they are being trapped into a New World Dimension Order? Is it because that their very symbol of liberty was designed/built in metric, in France? (Statue of Liberty) Or is it chauvinism, plain and simple?
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Robatoy wrote:

The UK still uses both systems so do many other countries and ex colonies
The uk switched to metric to bring us in line with the EEC as it was then however most people over 45 still tend to use imperial measurements because thats what we are used too although most can use metric if they need to
Road speed signs are still in imperial as are clothes sizes with the metric equivelent written next to them Shops were supposed to switch to metric however most still advertise foodweights in pounds and ounces as well
Time is rarely displayed in metric.
Alcohol is sold in imperial and metric measurements , fuel is now sold in litres so it looks cheaper on the forcourt (1.05p a litre sounds better than 4.80p a gallon as does a penny a litre rise against a 5 p a gallon rise )
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Australia began the process of converting to the metric system in 1970. (The use of metric measurement has been legal here since 1947 and our currency went metric in 1966.) It was completed in stages in various sections of government and industry over a period of about 18 years. Most of us, (me included,) stubbornly resisted the change at first. This was followed by a period of grudging acceptance of that which was foisted upon us. For a short while I coped by thinking in terms of imperial measurements and converting those to metric when necessary. It was not until I decided to start visualising in metric terms that it became easy. After couple of years I found that I liked it. It's simple and logical.
For woodworking, I use only metres and millimetres. Up to 2m in length, I use millimetres. Beyond that it's metres, taken to the third decimal. e.g. 3.750m, 1755mm. With a standard tape measure or rule, it is easy enough to measure to within .5mm. (Approximately 20 thousandths of an inch) Beyond that I would need to consider ambient temperature and moisture content and who knows what else. I find that degree of accuracy is more than adequate for my humble needs.
There is no denying that it was confusing and difficult for the aged part of our population. It took many years for my Mother to come to terms with Kilograms,Grams, Litres and Millilitres in the supermarket. She never did adapt to Kilometres, Metres and Centimetres. However, she coped.
And there was a cost to the everyday man in the street. As an example, during the changeover period, It became necessary to to purchase metric spanners, tape measures and various other measuring instruments. I guess the upside of that was a boost to the economy from purchases that otherwise would not have been made.
Everyday units of measurements are commonly expressed as follows: Length - Metres, centimetres, or millimetres. e.g. 1.325m = 132.5cm 1320mm. For everyday household use, centimetres are used. e.g. SWMBO is 172cm tall, the TV has a 30cm screen. I have yet to see anyone use decimetres and decametres. They seem to be superfluous. Mass - Kilograms, grams, milligrams e.g. 3.5kg = 350g = 3500mg Volume - Litres, millilitres 1.3l = 1300ml Fuel Consumption - litres/100km. (I still prefer to visualise miles per gallon, but I had to get over it.)
Common hardware items in other than metric sizes are still available in many places, although becoming less common. - Whitworth, UNC and UNF bolts for example.
Almost forty years later, with our daily lives and commerce based on the metric system, I believe that it was a farsighted decision for us to convert. We now live in a global economy. Having a common global system of measurement makes economic sense.
I, for one, would not wish to go back to the Imperial system.
Notwithstanding the above, I can understand why the US populace would be reluctant to change, (as we once were.) For that matter, I see no reason why they should if they have no wish to.
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