metal protection and Johnson's paste wax

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I have heard all the advise in this group about how great Johnson's paste wax is. It is loved, it is recommended, it is needed, "you need it" "I need it" and "oh it's getting hard to find these days"... I found it at my local true value for $6.99.
I used it on plane blades, cap irons, lever caps, soles and sides too. Thoroughly done coating and polishing.
Now, nothing derogatory is intended here. But I noticed, when a lot of work is being done my hands get hot and sweaty, when the protected metal is being handled, the JPW gets gets "tacky" and it gets on my hands, the metal also needs a new coating of it.
I also noticed that after a plane has been sittng a while on a shelf there develops small rust spots, JPW doesn't work too good I think. I suppose a coating needs to be thin and hard in order not to be obtrusive in any way, and actually work as intended.
Could there possibly be a better answer for a tool that is actually used and handled a lot? Perfect wipe-on product? Any help much appreciated.
--
Alex - newbie_neander in woodworking
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
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I've not had all that good luck with the wax either. I use Top Cote or Boeshield and get much better results. To remove rust, a product called Top Saver does an incredible job. Made by tablesaw look like new.
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wax
it" and "oh

for $6.99.

Thoroughly
work is

needs
develops
needs to

work as

and handled

Lots of them claim they are. I just use WD-40. Doesn't seem to do any worse than any other method I've tried, and it's a hell of a lot easier.
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paste
value
being
also
there
I'll second that, although I find WD-40 needs to be re-applied more frequently. Still, at the end of the day I wouldn't spend more than 10 mins giving every tool used a quick spray'n'wipe... and I'd wipe down every tool anyway as part of daily maintenance even if I wasn't using WD-40.
IMHO CRC is a good alternative, although I tend to reserve that for automotive use. (Wet electrics, etc.)
I should add two things:
1) It dissolves grease so be careful /where/ you use it! On the flip-side, I've a couple of "squeaky wheels" that can't be regreased. Cheap tools. [sigh] I liberally apply it *very* regularly then & I'm sure they've lasted a lot longer than they would've otherwise.
2) I only use it for tools in regular use; "stored" ones need something longer lasting. Personally I'm happy with light machine oil on infrequently used tools and a light-weight grease on the rare-use items, but even then I'll wipe 'em down and give 'em a squirt of WD-40 before use. And a re-application of oil/grease later, but each to their own. FWIW, I've inherited a lot of old tools and they're still almost as good as new. Well, as good as I got 'em, anyway.
'Tis all common sense, really, but that seems to be a rare commodity.
- Andy
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On Wed, 15 Jun 2005 02:58:12 -0700, AAvK wrote:

This advice is usually given for tables and other large, flat, machined surfaces.
<...>

I use camellia oil for hand tools. A quick wipe-down after the tool has been used keeps the rust away. It's traditionally what Japanese woodworkers use on their hand tools.
--
-Joe Wells

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A few tips on using JPW: Thin coats are better then thick coats, thick coats do not dry properly and tend to leave holes in the protection. After a thin coat has been applied and turns cloudy, buff it to a shine, it will dry harder and not be as subject to getting "tacky" when handled. JPW will evaporate with time to avoid this multiple then coats can be used to form a thick built up coat. Common solvents, such used in spray oils, etc. will dissolve JPW even if they are in the air. Used properly JPW will form a coating that will protect metal from rust for years. I have been using it for near on to 40 years and have very few problems with it.
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and
Lot of folks disagree that wax alone can form a "thick coat" if buffed off. Seems they contend that the solvent in the next "coat" dissolves and blends with the first.
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I'm not a chemist or anything like that but it does build up to form a thick coat even when buffed off. Seems that there is only so much solvent in a gob of wax, when it dries the solvent is gone and the solid particles stay in place, the next gob put on has the same amount of solvents but is now dealing with twice as much solids and so on until you get to the point where a build up starts because not all of the old solids are dissolved. JMO "> Lot of folks disagree that wax alone can form a "thick coat" if buffed off.

blends
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You have been using it for forty years, I have bought my first can of it, and I am forty. Irony. So it is just a slower, more careful procedure. Thanks for the info!
--
Alex - newbie_neander in woodworking
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
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Eventually I think most people migrate to Top Cote. Make for this specific purpose and has been working great for me since 1989. IMHO waxing is a temporary patch.
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This, I think, is a valid experience in Houston, Texas. More temperate climates, such as coastal areas of California, have fewer problems related to humidity.
Of course, the ground moves, things burn, and you don't want to ask about house prices. But the tools don't rust so much. Wax is adequate for me.
Patriarch, wondering when the plague of locusts is due...
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Ah thanks for saying what I left out. I should have said, for those that find that Wax is not adequate, Top Cote would be a wise direction to go.
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Wax works for me. I live in Seattle.

related
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Leon,
Ever try Waxilit?
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=&p2092&cat=1,43415,43440
--
Rumpty

Radial Arm Saw Forum: http://forums.delphiforums.com/woodbutcher/start
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Thanks, probably will if I can find it.
--
Alex - newbie_neander in woodworking
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
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LeeValley has it. ;~)
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Noooo. but that looks interesting for what it is actually intended. With Top Cote I apply about once every 6 months and just spray it on. I do not have to wipe it off.
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in most cases, if you're getting wax on your hands, you either put it on too thick or didn't buff it enough..
I've been using JPW on saw tables, blades, hand saws, etc., etc. for years and have never had it transfer or get tacky.. YMMV
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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Cosmoline.

wax
it" and "oh

for $6.99.

Thoroughly
work is

needs
develops
needs to

work as

and handled

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AAvK wrote:
snip

I shave up paraffin wax & dissolve it in mineral spirits. I keep it in a spray can I got from harbor fright. (Pressurized with air). I spray it on and it seems to work for me. Not tacky and doesn't attract dust.
--
Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA
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