Metal primer?

Page 2 of 2  
On Mar 3, 9:01 pm, tiredofspam <nospam.nospam.com> wrote:

Gives the insides of your lungs the same durable, weather resistant coating as it does your boat / Lamborghini / whatever.
Add pictures here
โœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mar 3, 9:01 pm, tiredofspam <nospam.nospam.com> wrote:

ACK!! My lungs received enough mistreatment back in the days when SCBAs were scarce.
Max
Add pictures here
โœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net says...

You've much overstated the toxicity of Imron. The real problem with it is that like most urethanes it's a respiratory sensitizer. You can spray it just fine for 20 years and then one day you walk into a room where it was sprayed a week ago and keel over in anaphylactic shock.
The reason for the air supplied respirator by the way is that the toxic component of Imron has no odor--you can't tell if your respirator is leaking or if the cartridge is shot so the only way to be sure is to use one that supplies positive air pressure.
Still, it's really overkill for a wrought iron railing unless you are already set up to apply it and have some material left over from another job.
Add pictures here
โœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

"filtered" out of the air by any conventuional respirator filters. Fresh air under pressure is the ONLY safe way to work with isocyanates. The iso-cyanates are both toxic to the liver AND respiratory sensitizers.
Add pictures here
โœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mar 5, 2:52 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

..
Correct. BUT... you can get canisters filter which will filter out polyicocyanates. They are similar to those used in nuclear plants. Aside from the particulate filtration, the charcoal component will, for a short time, filter out those gases. The positive-air full headgear masks simply allow you to work for longer periods of time.
Add pictures here
โœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 5 Mar 2011 13:56:36 -0800 (PST), Robatoy

effectiveness, and there is NO WAY to know when they have lost their effectiveness. I believe they are NOT approved by the applicable workplace safety administrations in canada any more.
Add pictures here
โœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca says...

Common misconception. Activated charcoal filters work fine. The problem is that since isocyanates have no odor you can't tell when the filter is saturated.

It is the only legal way for a business to do it in the US.

Please provide a source that supports your contention that isocyanates are hepatotoxic.
You might find <http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2004-116/pdfs/2004 - 116.pdf> to be of interest. Note that there is no mention of any effect on the liver. And that it states that air-purifying respirators are "not recommended since isocyanates have poor vapor-warning properties". Nothing about their not working. Here's another, a typical EU data sheet--note the approved respirator, and the extensive mention of health hazards with no mention of liver damage <http://www.habasit.com/media.asp?FI=Tempcol_EN_1009.pdf
And a third--similar information <http://www.swiss-composite.ch/pdf/s - PTG-1-Haerter-e.pdf>.
And here's a publication from the UK Health and Safety Executive <http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg388.pdf>. Again no mention of liver damage, and "The mist is tasteless and odourless and filtering face masks can fail to protect without warning."
Do you have a source that contradicts these?
Add pictures here
โœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

the liver - I didn't check on that and tell him he was wrong - I just added the respiratory sensitization. My bad.
The repiratory issues are serious enough without liver involvement - and the sensitization goes beyond respiratory.
Add pictures here
โœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Those odourless components are in suspension with components that do have a very strong, distinct odour... deliberately made 'stinky'. To say that Imron is odourless proves that yet once again, you don't know what you're talking about.
Add pictures here
โœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"tiredofspam" wrote in message
Hold on there. Before you do IMRON know the risks. IMRON must be sprayed with a full respirator. Not what you use in your shop. Its a respirator with a pump, and carbon filter, a hose long enough to keep the pump outside the contamination area. My setup cost me over 800 about 20 years ago.
IMRON on the other hand is one of the most durable paints. BUT WITHOUT A RESPIRATOR you will DIE. Your liver will be shot in a single application. The stuff never leaves it, and it builds up after each use. It doesn't take much to completely kill you. +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
There is no reason to spend that kind of money, if you are handy. I had a very small blower, or a hair dryer without the heat turned on will work.
Go to your big box store and get 80 feet or so of 1 1/4 inch plastic bilge hose, or something like that.
Take a respirator mask, and duct tape off one of the places the filters attach, and tape a 1" PVC elbow on the other place the cartridge is supposed to go. Attach the hose between the blower and the elbow, and put the blower out in fresh air, and you are good to go. Cover your skin with a tyvec suit and hood, and hopefully the respirator was a full face unit, then go at it. Total cost if you already had the respirator is around 50 bucks. All it has to do is blow more air than you can breath in, which isn't hard to do.
-- Jim in NC
Add pictures here
โœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Except IMRON is not epoxy, it is catalyzed cross-linked poly-urethane.

Add pictures here
โœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

google "rust converting primer" or "rust converting paint"
Add pictures here
โœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lotsa good info here and I appreciate it all. I've contributed a little over $300 for the steel in this project so I'm looking for some economy from this point on but I do want a durable product. I'll be doing my research. Special thanks to Gordon Ponsford for his e-mails.
Max
Add pictures here
โœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 3 Mar 2011 01:16:33 -0800 (PST), lektric dan

Rust conversion primer or paint is NOT required on clean rust-free metal. Not even the best choice.
You need something to provide "tooth" - sand blasting works well - as does an etching primer. Then you need something to provide rust protection. Zinc works real good for that - galvanizing works on the principal of a sacrificial coating - and zinc rich primers do the same Then you need a good sealer. DuPont Corlar is one excellent product of this type. It is an epoxy and impervious to just about anything.
Dupont PercoTop basically combines the two, and does not require an etch if applied to freshly blasted clean steel. Topcoating with DuPont Imron will give you just about as durable and rust-resistant finish you can get - and both products CAN be electrostatically sprayed, making the application extremely efficient.
Add pictures here
โœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Max" wrote:

Based on you're fire dep't experience, think you'll recognize the risks of spraying 2 part LP yacht finishes such as Imron, Awl Grip, etc without the proper safety equipment, including some kind of temporary spray booth.
Catalyzed resin in your lungs is a slow painful death.
You could apply with a brush; however, getting a good finish on a fence would be a bitch.
Matter of fact, spraying or brushing a fence would be a bear.
Powder coating offers a lot of advantages, not the least being long life.
Since this is a civic project, should be several means of securing some donations to offset the powder coating costs.
Have fun.
Lew
Add pictures here
โœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks, Lew. We've found a source for the paint job. Casa Ford body shop has volunteered. It won't be powder coated but it will get clear coated. And you're right about FD experience and familiarity with toxic substances, breathing protection, TLVs, etc.
Max
Add pictures here
โœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 2 Mar 2011 09:22:08 -0700, Max wrote

Dupont Variprime (or basically any zinc oxide based etching primer)
-BR
Add pictures here
โœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 5 Mar 2011 07:40:31 -0700, Bruce wrote

Errr, make that zinc chromate (the avacado green stuff) -BR

Add pictures here
โœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Galvafroid
--
Stuart Winsor

Midland RISC OS show - Sat July 9th 2011
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
โœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.