Metal furnace ducting for mainline???????????????

Hi group: What success have you people had using the normal household furnace ducting for a mainline. I know I would have to duct-tape the joint on the whole length??????????????
Jow
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Part of my system uses 30ga ducting. Works fine!

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I have heard of some saying their system can collapse the thin stuff if all their gates are closed but I have my doubts unless their system is extremely tight and have some damaged duct (badly flattened). If you think you are approaching this situation just bleed a bit of air - yeah, I know that isn't the idea but life isn't perfect at least on the cheap. Billh

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billh wrote:

The problem with "just bleed a little air" is that you don't know you need to until it's too late.

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--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
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Or you buy a bleed valve for the system.

think
know
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Good success in my situation, which is a part time shop using a DC1100C with 1 to 2 machines at a time, mostly 30 Ga round 4" (some 26 Ga), standard adjustable Ell's, going two directions with the DC in the middle. These standard Ell's won't hold up to the wearing action of wood particles 40 hours a week of course, but then again, replacing a $6 Ell once in a while isn't a big deal either. I either used metal duct tape or gray RTV for the joints from one pipe to another or to a fitting, and mostly ignored the seam down the length of the pipe. A main trunk of 5" round would have been ok or better when multiple gates are open, but if I had to do it again, I'd save the few $ and use 4" again. The 45 degree wye's are better than 90 degree Tee's. Grounding is so easy with this stuff, and there are no ground wires in the pipe to catch clogs. There are a number of sites on the web that descibe some of this like: http://www.airhand.com and http://www.oneida-air.com / GL!

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golf wrote:

You can also use 4" schedule 40 PVC.
Deb
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============================================================================ I use metal, too. The only problem I see with the PVC is that you still have to ground it, whereas the metal acts as a ground.
"Just one OLD man's opinion."
The Other Bruce
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SNIP ....

===================Bruce, The metal ducting is conductive, but is not grounded unless it is in contact with a grounded tool, or has a grounding wire run to an established ground lug/connection.
Ken Moon Webberville, TX
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Jow,
I installed some in my shop about 5 years ago and it seems to work fine, also it's pretty cheap. However, I put one length of a heavier duct called spiral duct that has a length of steel curled around the outside. It is much more substantial and if the cost isn't critical I would definitely recommend this instead.
Good luck,
Glen Duff
golf wrote:

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