Metal Detector

I was thinking about taking a circular saw to several cabinets and a full size hollow door (so that I can discard the pieces and avoid what I consider an unreasonable extra expense).
Anyone know if this metal detector any good for identifying potential trouble spots?
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber245
It's from Harbor Freight, so it has to be good, right? ; )
Thanks, Bill
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"Bill" wrote:

What does $16.99 tell you.
Lew
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On Thu, 5 Nov 2009 23:57:56 -0800, the infamous "Lew Hodgett"

It's SUPER ACCURATE?
-- "To compel a man to subsidize with his taxes the propagation of ideas which he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical." -- Thomas Jefferson
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Bill wrote:

I'd take one home and test it. You could pick up an 38542-0VGA for $1.97 worth of insurance...
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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You will never get all of the metal out. But a visual inspection can do 99% of what you need.
When we clean up a job, we often take the circular saw to the demo materials so they will fit in small dumpsters, the back of pickups, or in the contractor trash bags.
We clean up what we see, then chop it all up with a circular saw with a well worn "sacrificial" carbide blade on it. It takes too long (and is too expensive) to scout for every single piece of metal. Just chop it up and dispose of it.
Make sure you wear eye protection, but make double sure you do just in case you hit a hidden metal connector or nail.
Robert
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Yep, junk saw, junk blade, and good eyeware.
basilisk
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On Fri, 06 Nov 2009 02:34:25 -0600, the infamous Morris Dovey

I've used those blades. They'll cut through nails pretty easily. The only problem I had was having to file out the diamond to fit the arbor on Dad's old Crapsman circ saw.
-- "To compel a man to subsidize with his taxes the propagation of ideas which he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical." -- Thomas Jefferson
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Larry Jaques wrote:

That'll bring the cost WAY BELOW the estimate from the disposal people! Thanks.
I have some quite powerful (for their size) small magnets that were made for digital devices. Those may help detect most of the metal I'm most-likely to run across. I get enough cuts and scratches just performing "maintenance" chores. I sensed that I better raise my level of caution/alertness as I work with more dangerous equipment so I don't have to relate any sad stories... You can see that in my interest in a metal detector. I'm very thankful for the safety lessons I received from my h.s. shop teachers! My praise to any teachers reading this who provide these lessons.
Bill
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Home Depot is offering a "demo demon" blade designed for exactly that kind of use, for around $15.

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On Sun, 08 Nov 2009 13:00:13 -0600, the infamous snipped-for-privacy@host122.r-bonomi.com (Robert Bonomi) scrawled the following:

From the HD description "Diablo saw blades use Freud-made TiCo Hi-Density Carbide with Titanium for a long cutting life and ultra-fine finish." Fine finish for your demo project. Har!
I wonder if it's any better than the old Diablo D0724R framing blade at $9.97. I've had extremely good luck with the B&D Piranha blades at under $6 each.

It's Chiwanese. What's not to like? ;)
-- The Smart Person learns from his mistakes. The Wise Person learns from the mistakes of others. And then there are all the rest of us... -----------------------------------------------------
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Bill wrote:

SFWIW:
My local hardware has an exchange plan for 7-1/4" carbide tipped blades.
Designed specifically for rough work.
Last time I looked, they were about $2 with exchange.
Might want to check your hardware store.
Lew
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At this point, I don't have a circular saw. I'm going to visit my local pawn shop this week. I noticed that Sears has a 71/4" saw on sale for $39.99.... I'll be putting on a dust mask in hopes that I avoid the allergic reaction I got last time I sanded plywood. That time I was working with sandpaper and surely inhaled some of the dust, this time I will be more careful! Maybe I'll try out the particulate respirator my wife bought me for my b-day.
Bill
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Don't be silly. Of course you should wear breathing protection when sanding, especially if you are doing it without dust collection.
And to sand today's plywoods, particularly those of unknown origin, it isn't smart at all.
If you are buying hardwood plywood from your local box store, it can come from anywhere. Over the years, I have seen plywood at the local HD come from Chile, China, Canada, USA, and a batch that came from Indonesia. No one seems to know anymore on the foreign sourced woods what the middle part of the sandwich is, or what type of adhesive was used in manufacture.
Breathing tiny particles of unknown substances into your blood system just isn't smart.
Robert
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wrote:

Don't be silly. Of course you should wear breathing protection when sanding, especially if you are doing it without dust collection.
And to sand today's plywoods, particularly those of unknown origin, it isn't smart at all.
If you are buying hardwood plywood from your local box store, it can come from anywhere. Over the years, I have seen plywood at the local HD come from Chile, China, Canada, USA, and a batch that came from Indonesia. No one seems to know anymore on the foreign sourced woods what the middle part of the sandwich is, or what type of adhesive was used in manufacture.
Breathing tiny particles of unknown substances into your blood system just isn't smart.
Robert
Thanks for posting this.
Bill
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My thanks to Lew for suggesting a reciprocating saw for "demolition". Harbor Freight put a coupon in USA Today (no less), for one for $19.99 It's only 6 Amps, but my needs are quite modest (just "wood"). If it works on my cabinets, I will preclude paying a disposal service over $100. I'm will handle it sort of the way Johnny Cash sang about in his song: I'll discard my stuff "one piece at a time"! Anything "heavy" requires $25 just to send a truck out--even though they only come out for that stuff once a month. Billing policies are sometimes funny that way...
Bill
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