Messing with 2by4s...

I just added to my web site a sketch of the jig I just designed to temporarily hold a 9' 2by4 at ceiling level. I will also use it to hold up 4 foot fluorescent light fixtures while I install them (I'm a one-man show). The actual height of my ceiling is about 93", but that may be immaterial.
http://web.newsguy.com/MySite /
Assume 3 nails into from the vertical stud into the base. My question is: What is the easiest way to further reinforce it?
I am considering (1) nailing a small 3.5" square piece of 2by4 on each side of the bottom of the vertical stud and then a 10" piece of 2by4 across these 2 squares, boxing the vertical stud in. This may be slight overkill, but hey, I have a reputation to maintain.
I was also (2) considering a foot long length of 2by4 with 45 degree angle cut on each end positioned diagonally between the base and the vertical stud. My concern here was not whether this was a good idea, but that a nail through the "top" of a 45 degree end was likely to split it...
Just thought I'd see what people who know think.
By the way, I also submit this as another example of sketching with SketchUp for folks who are still wondering whether it is really useful or not. Note how I was able to add "notes" off to the side--which are as easily maintainable as on an editable document... Not only that, I could just print it out and mail it to the patent office...LOL! : )
Bill
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Bill,
Take a 24" x 24" piece of hardboard (called masonite where I'm from) and cut across it diagonally making two large 90 triangles. Place these in between the base pieces and the lower upright. This should prevent any racking of the base.
Hope this helps. Steve
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Steve wrote:

You must be thinking of that 1/4" hardboard, huh (I usually buy the 1/8" stuff). Thank You for the idea, I would have never thought of that! Hardboard comes in handy more often than I would have expected. See Wikipedia for more uses (protecting walls and floors,...). I learned that it's Formaldehyde-free too, which is something I appreciate and wasn't sure about.
Looking at my picture again, I think I better add something to help keep my jig from tipping too. I just happen to have 2 bags of top soil, but I ought to be able to do a little better than that.
By the way, in case you are curious, half of the reason for this "jig" is for a sintifik experiment to determine whether three 48" fluorescent fixtures in 8' produces an unpleasant amount of light or not. You may recall this was enthusiastically discussed earlier in the year (and, although there are charts, graphs and standards, to some extent, is a matter of personal taste). I've got the lights, and the bulbs, and after I complete this scaffolding we'll find out...lol.
Bill
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Bill, just a suggestion, but if you do a lot of solo work, you really want to get a couple of these <http://www.coastaltool.com/other/fastcap/3rd_hand.html?id=RzPAjpXc .
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+1 They're really useful and a good investment. I use them primarily for erecting temporary barriers, but I've used them for a host of things where the load isn't too great. First thing that came to mind when I saw your jig sketch and application.
R
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On 7/6/2011 1:41 AM, Bill wrote:

Well, you've already been beat to the punch by years. :)
The advantage of using yours, and the other similar off the shelf methods, are that you can do them easier singlehandedly,
However, just so you know ... there is also a traditional way to do this in the construction business, which works for your application, as well as being particularly helpful when you need temporary supports in a load bearing situation, and with much more upward force possible:
Simply cut two, or more, of the vertical 2x4 components ~2" longer than the ceiling height.
Wedge them at an angle between a 2x4 held to the ceiling and another 2x4 laid on the floor. One nail through each of the vertical supports into the top 2x4 will quickly hold them in place at the top.
By tapping the bottom of each vertical support with a hammer, then putting in one nail to hold it to the bottom sill, you can exert much more control over the amount of upward support you give to what you want to hold up.
Placing the vertical supports in a rough triangle thusly is a time honored method to support a ceiling when removing an existing load bearing wall and replacing with a beam.
The advantages are that it is quick to do, strong, infinitely adjustable with a hammer tap, can be done at no cost from materials that are readily available on site, the components do not have to be stored/transported, and when taking the temporary support down, said used materials can be used immediately in the rest of the project.
We often use the above method to quickly erect dust control barriers; and by using strips of sheet insulation between the horizontal 2 x 4's, there is little risk of damage to the existing ceiling or floor.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/15/2010
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Swingman wrote:

> <snip>
Thank you for sharing a thoughtful and valuable lesson!
Bill
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Sorry, suh, but you haven't spent enough time in design yet to ask for help. ;)
Where's the vertical adjustability? Where's the lateral stability?
Get a couple of the HF 955746 (damn, HF discontinued them!) adjustable poles and modify them with tripod feet and upper fingers. You need them around, anyway. ;) Try zipwall poles, cha ching!

Correct. "Slight" just won't cut it. Go for the gusto, boy!

It will. Drill clearance holes.

Be sure to reference all the drywall lift patents. http://goo.gl/LINhw
-- Fear not those who argue but those who dodge. -- Marie Ebner von Eschenbach
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Bill wrote:

Without worrying about tipping, let me just say that it is much easier to get/adjust vertical height by using a couple of hand screws instead of nails to hold the 2x4 pieces together.
--

dadiOH
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dadiOH wrote:

dadiOH, I was going to use nails at the base, and 3/8" bolts along the vertical. If I see 3/8" wingnuts, I'll pick them up. I didn't think of using my handscrews--great idea for "infinite adjustability". I'm going to head over to that Big Orange Store. Thanks!
Bill
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"Bill" wrote:

-------------------------------- Another classic case of over engineered and under peckered.
1) Two (2) 2x4's, 72"-84" long. 2) Two (2), 4" C-Clamps 3) A 24 OZ, Dead weight hammer.
Time for a beer.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Maybe so, but if you take the thread as a whole, I think there was a fair amount of peck in it--assuming you include your two 24oz dead weight hammers. My grandfather's 16 oz claw is all I got... I'll build the "scaffolding/jig" tonight.
I'm in the process of clearing everything away from my last wall, so it will take most of time to organize and cover stuff so that I'll be able to sand, paint and put up lights without moving the stuff again. I bought a 8.5' by 100' roll of 3 mil plastic, which should be handy.
Bill

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"Bill" wrote:

------------------------- $5.00 and a trip to H/F and you're covered.
Lew
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If all you need do is hold a two-by to the ceiling while you nail it in place - a couple of eight-foot 1 x 4's cut to fit tight would be simpler to jam in place 'till you shoot the nails or screws in place. Way over-worked.
Also the $35 prop stick thing can be bought at HFT for ten bucks on sale and work reasonably well - though, after a year or so I had to reinforce the handle with some aluminium.
If the 2by is to be temporarily secured, use screws and patch the ceiling after removing the board.
Having said all that, 2-bulb shop lights are not that heavy and can be hung with little screw eyes ad bits of chain - as are all in my shop, If you want to gang three or so, tie them to a short length of wood and use the screw eyes, chains and hooks to tie that to the ceiling
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