Mechanical Aptitude Test

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Joe AutoDrill wrote:

470.
I agree with Chip on Q31. But by his (and my) analysis, none of the answers given were correct.
--Steve
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Same score and comment on Q31 as Steve. Kerry
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Joe AutoDrill wrote:

Fun little test. I got 480.
Their answer to #16 is wrong. Since the ropes are angled somewhat the actual force would be more than 50kg. (And besides, kg are a unit of mass, not force. The actual force would be a bit more than 9.8 * 50 Newtons.)
I too think their answer in #31 is wrong, and some of their electrical symbols are a bit funky.
I got wrong the pipe one wrong. I expect that Bernoulli's principle means that the pressure is lower in the narrower section.
I also got the "naturally aspirated engine" one wrong. I said it was suction from the piston, but really that wouldn't cause anything to happen without atmospheric pressure pushing it in, so I guess I can't complain.
Chris
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Ditto in score (480) and ditto in complaints. Without the piston creating a (partial) vacuum, the atmosphere could NOT push in the air....and the piston down. Got the pipe one wrong too.
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Without an atmosphere, there would be no vacuum. :)
--


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Joe Agro, Jr.
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Vacuum is the default. The voids of space are a vacuum. Atmosphere and its pressure are the aberration.
The piston is mechanically pulled down to create a condition akin to a vacuum. The mere presence of an atmosphere allows a flow to occur TO the vacuum. The atmospheric pressure does NOT create a vacuum. In the piston's case, a mechanical event creates a vacuum. The void created by removing atmospheric pressure creates the vacuum, therefore......
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wrote:

Again, this one is debatable as both 'Suction' and 'Atmospheric Pressue' are valid answers.
As the piston goes down, it results in lowering the air pressure inside the chamber. Thus there is now a difference in pressure between inside the chamber and outside. It's this difference in air pressure that results in air flowing into the chamber.
Of course the piston going down creates a lower pressure in the chamber, which results in 'sucking' the air in.
Both answers are correct.
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No they are not. Atmospheric pressure is 14.6 PSIA A little over 14 psi over nothing. Nothing (vacuum) is the default. The downward pull of the piston is created by a mechanical input. (Flywheel, whatever) The atmosphere simply fills that void...it surely does not CREATE the vacuum.
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I think this one's reasonable - it's multi-choice, you do know that it's one of the answers, and _only_ one of the answers. With that extra axiom, the answer is clearly "atmospheric pressure" rather than "cylinder suction".
Given what I learned from the balloons question, I think it's actually local variations in non-constant air pressure between cylinders...
--
Cats have nine lives, which is why they rarely post to Usenet.

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"Robatoy" wrote

Not being smart enough to make this old box do/allow php, I don't see anything but a banner ad for trucks and diesel parts ... so I guess I fail by default.
Sounds interesting, though.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/20/07
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I will remain interesting as long as Miller doesn't find a semantic error somewhere by somebody. Nobody throws cold water on warm, fuzzy, cozy discussions like Miller.
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490. I'd like to know which question I missed....
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There is some little clickable thing at the bottom that reveals which you missed.
--


Regards,
Joe Agro, Jr.
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John Cochran wrote:

While working on the test, you can click on the circle with two rectangles in the lower left area.
Good score!
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wrote:

470
missed the planetary gear direction, matching up the description (reverse, reduction, etc.) with the gear pictures, and the fan blowing on the fan.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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The fan blowing on the fan is an ambiguous question. They're facing each other, and spinning the "same" direction, in the sense that when viewed from the side, they're both spinning down on the edge facing you (or up, depending on which side you're on). But when each one is viewed from *its*own* front, one is spinning clockwise, and the other counterclockwise.
So is that the same direction? Or the opposite direction?
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Oct 23, 8:04 pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Both blades rotate in the same direction regardless of vantage point. You stand behind one fan, and both blades turn clockwise. You stand behind the other, both blades turn anti-clockwise. What on earth is so hard about that, oh wise one?
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wrote:

The confusion is "same direction" and where the observer stands when evaluating the direction of each fan. Part of this test is understanding the question. I should have got a perfect score with my background and education, but did not. I excel at engineering and math, but English comprehension is another story.
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Phisherman wrote:

You could look at it this way: The fan that is running is turning in its normal direction, and the fan that is not running is turning opposite of its normal direction. Therefore, they are turning in opposite directions. This reasoning makes the most sense to me, because it takes point of view totally out of the equation.
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But according to the testmakers, that's the "wrong" answer. :-)
Without knowing what frame of reference is intended by the testmaker, it's not possible to determine which answer is "correct".
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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