Measuring Devices / Tape Measures

Page 1 of 2  
I was watching Norm today - he was measuring up a piece of lumber, and he used a tape measure. I couldn't tell what brand, but it made me think about the worthless tape measure I have in my shop - that I try to avoid using. Why? Because the end of it is loose, and if you don't push the tape back toward it, the measurement can be off by nearly 1/8".
I was in Lowes today, and checked out their tape measures - even on the more expensive ones the end of it was loose! One was even worse than the one I have.
I've mostly used a folding carpenter's rule with a metal insert for 1" - 6", because the tape measure isn't reliable.
What does everyone else use?
Thanks -
Nick B
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In rec.woodworking

A tape measure but always consider it a "rough" measurement unless I can hold off an inch on the end.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

worthless tape measure I have in my shop that I try to avoid using.

Hey Nick, that looseness might be to allow the tape to measure both inside and outside spans. See if the distance the tape moves on the end is the same as the thickness of the end. Good luck. Tom
Someday, it'll all be over....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Nick Bozovich" wrote in message

That is a "feature" that is actually by design on most tape measures so that you can take accurate inside measurements.The amount of slop should be equal to the thickness of the hook ... generally about 1/6th or so.

6",
The "accuracy" of a particular tape measure is completely irrelevant as long as you ALWAYS use the same one.
AAMOF, tape measures aren't even necessary in woodworking. Many furniture and cabinet makers go with a stick with the project measurements marked off linearly. It's called a "story stick" and is much more accurate than using a tape measure. Save the story stick and you can build another project with the _exact_ same dimensions as the original 50 years later ... you can't do that with a tape measure unless you use the same one.
The moral, because tape measures to come in handy, is to buy a well made one that will last a long time and use it exclusively ... again, the "accuracy" of the tool is irrelevant.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 1/02/04
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

back
that
equal
long
off
a
do
one
"accuracy"
Are you kidding me? I'm not sure where my tape measure is 50% of the time and I'm going to keep track of a stick for 50 years? ;-)
todd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snip

That was a laugh out loud one! I'm sure there are european trained furniture makers who can and do keep story sticks for 50 years. Me, I'm with Todd. If they'd just put a "page" function like on portable phones, on pocket tapes ...
Actual "measured" lengths aren't that important (unless you're doing built ins. Its far more important that all parts that are supposed to be the same length are in fact the same length. If I need parts to fit between A and B I put two sticks - with sqaure ends, in the space, slide them to fit the desired distance and clamp them together. On the SCMA I use the sticks to set the stop and cut all those parts at the same time. As long as the parts fit properly I don't care what the tape measured length is.
charlie b
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That's exactly the reason I have three 30' in the shop, there is always one laying around somewhere.
Dave

furniture
marked
using
with
can't
time
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This is true, unless you have to send your measurements to someone else.
I found that out the hard way once when I ordered a glass table top based on a tape measure measurement. Unfortunately, my tape and their measurement device did not agree. (I suspect theirs was probably the accurate one.)
I checked by tapes and rulers. The straight-edge rulers were very accurate. However the tapes were all over the place. After all, they're made for construction work, usually for fairly long lengths, and a tolerance of plus or minus 1/16 is acceptable (except for finish work).
My newest tape, a Stanley "MaxSteel Contractor Grade", 3m/10ft, is off 3/32 in the first 24 inches, resulting in a short cut. My Craftsman 16ft tape is off 1/32 in the first 24, but cuts long, so if the error causes a problem, I can trim the piece to the correct length.
My next purchase will be a steel hook-end ruler from Lee Valley.
--
Regards,

Benoit Evans
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"K.-Benoit Evans" wrote in message

Done that. Now when ordering glass, particulary if it is to be inset into a frame of some type, I either have the glass cut first and build to it, send a template, or take the piece to the glass shop and let them measure it. Most glass cutters cut to +/- 1/16" tolerance, which, as you noted, can be problematic when measuring with two different measuring devices..

Tolerances used to be that way down here, but with the advent of "carpenters" named after Mary's son, and who hail from places with no wood whatsoever, the framers seem to think 1/2" is close enough, and the finish guys 1/4".
These days, it's the painters, with their caulk guns, who make things fit.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 1/02/04
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
    Greetings and Salutations.
    *snip*

    Hum...it is my understanding that this is hardly a new thing. Back when "drywall" was actually "Plaster put on by skilled workers" the attitude of the carpenters was "get it pretty close and the plasterers will fix it".     regards     Dave Mundt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Dave Mundt" wrote in message

fit.
Not around here, at least until the last 25 or so years ... with the proliferation of unskilled labor, poor wages, and lack of supervision, workmanship is suffering badly in the building industry in these parts.
The traditional framing carpenter's job was to make the house plumb, level and square ... hard to do that when 1/2" is now "close enough".
The traditional finish carpenter's job was to make the parts, windows, doors, trim, etc., fit and "look good". IOW boards meet where they're supposed to and planned gaps consistent from end to end ... hard to do when 1/4" is now "close enough".
... enter the modern painter and his caulking gun, absolutely necessary to make the work of today's 'finishing carpenter' "look good".
I know this to be a fact because I just finished building a "custom" home with a highly touted, supposedly top notch crew, and had to continually fight shoddy work, with the practice of the above tolerances in daily application (when they could get away with it) ... work that you wouldn't have seen in a tract home 30 years ago.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 1/02/04
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

"Putty and paint, Make a carpenter what he ain't"
I heard that one when i was given the job of famowoodin' a lot of stuff.
I wonder how old it is.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"todd" wrote in message

LOL ... know the feeling well. However, you may be around in 50 years ... that's something I don't have to worry about. ;>)
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 1/02/04
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Swingman writes:

Me, either, but a guy I know who owns a cabinet shop may be setting his up the same way the previous owner, his father did: he has an entire wall devoted to hanging story sticks, each with name and date neatly written on them. One job per nail, mostly, except for really small jobs. I'd guess that JR has about 45 years of such sticks now, since he's been running the business about 20 years after his father retired. He'll hit the 50 year mark soon.
Charlie Self "I am a marvelous housekeeper. Every time I leave a man I keep his house." Zsa Zsa Gabor
http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I always know where my tape measure is. It's right where I put it down the last time. Of course, sometimes I have trouble remembering where I put it down the last time :-)
"Wherever you go, there you are"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I wear a shop apron. This allows me to know where my tape, saddle square, and 6" combo are 99% of the time. I use the same 18' center finding tape for all my woodworking.
Of course, my wife recently figured out that the tape is in the apron, so all bets are off. <G>
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Roy Smith wrote:

and the key to finding something is to remember that no matter what or where it is, it's always in the last place you look.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Silvan wrote:

Not true. Not true. Hear that all the time, but it is not true. I often give up and send my wife to look and it is often where I first looked, and seldom where I last looked. Let's get rid of this supposed logical statement, because it just isn't true.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

From what I understand the end should slide the thickness of the tab thingie. This allows you to make inside and outside measurements without needing to compensate for the end of the tape's tab thickness.
-- John, in Minnesota
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Smells fishy!

about
more
6",
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.