MDF vs. Hardboard

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So...I need to make a cross cut sled and I have made them in the past using tempered hardboard that was smooth on both sides...I'm having a very hard time finding that stock now, altho I can find plenty of 1/4" MDF. SO...for a sled, will MDF work out all right or should I keep looking for the tempered hardboard?
Mike
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I would look for the hardwood, The MDF will not slide as well on the saw. Randy http://www.nokeswoodworks.com
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On Sat, 29 Mar 2008 06:27:11 -0700 (PDT), randyswoodshoop

Wax, Grasshopper... Wax...
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"Valued Corporate #120,345 Employee (B A R R Y)"
wrote: | > | >I would look for the hardwood, The MDF will not slide as well on the | >saw. | | Wax, Grasshopper... Wax...
Hmmm.... what an odd coincidence. I have a recording of Wild West Tech playing in a window while reading the rec. As I was opening this message David Carradine was saying , "Remember Grasshopper, the taking of a life does no one honor." So which is it, wax or no honor that is the Master's words of wisdom for today?
Me, I have use a waxed piece of Baltic birch for my sled...
John
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On Sat, 29 Mar 2008 10:02:21 -0400, "John Grossbohlin"

Same here, but what's at hand is often when gets used. <G>
I've made lots of MDF jigs, as well as plywood, and wax is very worthwhile on the moving parts, regardless of wood-based material.
Of course, no wax on surfaces where the stock goes. DAMHIKT!
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On Sat, 29 Mar 2008 10:11:42 -0400, "Valued Corporate #120,345

BoeLub works good even where the stock goes.
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John Grossbohlin wrote:

Same here, mine is all Baltic birch and works just fine without wax applied to the sled, simply because wax is applied to the saw.
--
Blog Me! http://BitchSpot.JadeDragonOnline.com

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On Sat, 29 Mar 2008 10:02:21 -0400, "John Grossbohlin"

Definitely the best. MDF and "Masonite" or Tempered Hardboard are both OK for short term light use but both deteriorate with age and moisture, and are low strength. Baltic Plywood is dimensionally stable, moisture resistant, strong, and takes a good finish/holds wax well .
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On Sat, 29 Mar 2008 13:39:26 GMT, "Valued Corporate #120,345 Employee (B A R R

I used to use Johnson's wax but since I've been using TopCoat on the table saw, a plywood sled slides just fine without wax... YMWV
mac
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wrote:

old candle ends.
Tim w Three months, two days, 5 hs, 38 mins & 38 secs. 1118 cigarettes not smoked, saving 251.73. Life saved: 3 days, 21 hours, 10 minutes. Going all the way this time.
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If it was smooth on both sides it was MDF. The manufacturing process is quite different but the end product is not. The 'tempering' I think refers to the inclusion of oils in the hardboard recipe.
Tim w
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On Sat, 29 Mar 2008 13:38:59 +0000, Tim W wrote:

That may be true today, but if by hardboard the OP meant tempered masonite, it used to be available smooth on both sides.
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That is what it was...smooth masonite. I think the last time I bought it, I was still in high school...and that was nearly thirty years ago.
So...the consensus seems to be to use MDF with a good coat of wax...that works for me.
Thanks to all input, as usual, helpful and to the point!
Mike
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Yes I think they call it masonite in america. I stand corrected. I have never seen hardboard smooth both sides, but plenty of 3mm mdf.
Tim w Three months, two days, 5 hs, 36 mins & 30 secs. 1118 cigarettes not smoked, saving 251.73. Life saved: 3 days, 21 hours, 10 minutes. Going all the way this time.
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On Sat, 29 Mar 2008 18:37:34 GMT, "Tim W"

It is out there, as I have some in my basement.
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Masonite is the trade name of hardboard made by the Masonite Corporation, founded by William Mason. They no longer make that product, but they do make doors.
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wrote:

Many of which still have "tempered hardboard" skins.
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On Sat, 29 Mar 2008 15:59:08 -0400, clare at snyder dot ontario dot canada wrote:

Seems to me I've replaced a lot of those in rentals.. seems the doors were tempered but the tenants weren't..
mac
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On Sat, 29 Mar 2008 14:05:31 -0800, mac davis

Tennants were just BAD TEMPERED

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On Sat, 29 Mar 2008 13:38:59 GMT, "Tim W"

Tempered hardboard is NOT MDF. It is SIMILAR but not nearly as dense - it splits in layers - and it was available smooth one side, or smooth both sides. Most common was smooth one side. The stuff used for the backs on cheap knock-down /ship-flat furniture and the moulded backs in cheap kitchen cabinets, as well as many hollow-core interior paint grade doors. Was also the base of the majority of the cheap :wood paneling" installed in the sixties and seventies.
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