MDF Off-gassing


Hi, can anyone talk to the issues of the off-gassing of MDF? A contractor brought it to my attention that the MDF doors I want to purchase will off-gas. Ok, but I was also told that nearly everything off-gasses including the carpet you install, foam matresses etc. I can not find any information on what off-gassing will do to you, only that MDF does. My question's are: - won't it be sealed once you paint it? - how harmful is off-gassing from MDF? - what are the effects of off-gassing on us? thanks in advance to anyone who can give me documented information (not oppinions, please) on this subject. Christy
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Pretty much. No always perfect, but close enough.

It would take a lot more than a door to the bedroom is going to give off. Not a concern, IMO. It does stop after a short time also.

You feel better after. Others oftem complainof you off gass too close or after pickled eggs and beer.

http://www.informinc.org/fact_P3pressedwood.php http://www.advancedbuildings.org/main_t_finishes_formaldehyde.htm These guys have a primer just for that reason http://www.ecospaints.com/painttypes.htm
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After a meal like that, it's always fun to light one up.
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What you concerned about is that MDF off gasses urea-formaldehyde.
There are a couple of urea-formaldehyde free MDF manufacturers, and a few composite board manufacturers who use phenol-formaldehyde in their manufacturing process, which doesn't pollute/off gass at the same level that urea-formaldehyde does.
You should be able to find them easily doing a Google search.
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Swingman wrote:

The OP wants to buy doors, not sheet goods. If they have questions about what type of MDF was used in the doors, they should contact the door manufacturer and take it from there.
If the door is sealed with a vapor barrier paint there shouldn't be any meaurable outgtassing.
R
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"RicodJour" wrote in message

Read the first question again. Pretty hard to miss the OP wanted information on MDF off gassing and it is that is harmful about it.
You didn't even come close to answering that, but take me to task for doing so?
Kiss my ass ...
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- won't it be sealed once you paint it? - how harmful is off-gassing from MDF? - what are the effects of off-gassing on us?
Off-gassing affects people differently - some people are very sensitive to it and get headaches etc after even minimal exposure, others don't notice any symptoms. It's true that most carpet, foam, particleboard, MDF, oil-based paint, most new furniture containing these products, etc. all off-gas various solvents. However, as I understand it, because they haven't been in use for all that long and not everyone shows "symptoms" when exposed, there isn't a lot of research out yet. Some people say you should avoid these items altogether, and some say symptoms are imaginary and it doesn't make a difference. Either way, the solvents in the glue are not healthy for you. If it were me, and I had the choice of buying solid wood instead of MDF for indoor furniture/doors/etc, I'd avoid the formaldehyde-based solvent glues and go with the solid wood, especially if you have young children or family members that are sensitive to solvents/chemical smells. And yes, painting with latex paint or sealing with shellac should at least reduce off-gassing. Andy
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Swingman wrote:

Are you always so sensitive? Sheesh.
I thought I did answer what needed to be answered - seal the door with a vapor barrier paint. As to the rest, I'm sure the OP can Google as well as you or I.
The driving force in the OP's questions is the contractor scaring her with talk about outgassing from the MDF doors. I'm not sure how your answer to a question that wasn't asked helps clarify anything.
You could have pointed her in the direction of http://www.vtindustries.com/doors/ - a manufacturer of urea-formaldehyde free doors (they ain't gonna be cheap), or the EPA's page on formaldehyde http://www.epa.gov/iaq/formalde.html
R
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"RicodJour" wrote in message

any
information
doing
Perhaps you should give up on being a moderator wannabe and concentrate on trying to understand that by adding to the OP's knowledge regarding the nature of the problem, they can contact the manufacturer of an alternate product to find who uses the alternate product to manufacture doors/widgets/whathaveyou's.
Tough concept .. but while you're working that out in your head, go ahead and post your e-mail address so the rest of us can send our future replies to you for approval prior to posting.
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wrote:

No.
So many factors here, like the amount of MDF, the exposure time, ventilation, health of the people, unborn, etc.

Well, much of the gas is formaldehyde which is not healthy. When formaldehyde is present in the air at levels exceeding 0.1 ppm, some individuals may experience health effects such as watery eyes; burning sensations of the eyes, nose, and throat; coughing; wheezing; nausea; headaches; and skin irritation. Long-term effects are less known, with a possible link to cancer.

I'm sure you can find some government findings about formaldehyde. The allowed concentration has been lowered in the past 10 years.
If you are concerned, allow more ventilation into your home for a month or so. The amount of formaldehyde in a double door can not be much to be concerned about. If there are pregnant women in the house or individuals with a weakened immunity, put the doors in the garage for a few months before you install.
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Phisherman wrote:

Well, that's kind of a blanket statement and assumes that all paint/coatings would be similarly ineffective.
An epoxy paint would certainly seal the door and prevent outgassing, but it's probably not warranted. It's unrealistic to try to achieve perfect sealing of the doors when, as the OP noted, there are so many other things that are larger and more of a concern.
You're really just looking to slow down the outgassing to a minimal level with a reasonable amount of effort and expense. That's why I suggested a vapor barrier paint. There are other coatings that would suffice. http://experts.about.com/q/Chemistry-including-Biochemistry-1355/MDF-Formaldehyde-paint.htm And the CPSC http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/725.html has this to say on the matter: "Here are some of the methods to reduce indoor levels of formaldehyde. 1. Bring large amounts of fresh air into the home. Increase ventilation by opening doors and windows and installing an exhaust fan(s). 2. Seal the surfaces of the formaldehyde-containing products that are not already laminated or coated. You may use a vapor barrier such as some paints, varnishes, or a layer of vinyl or polyurethane-like materials. Be sure to seal completely, with a material that does not itself contain formaldehyde. Many paints and coatings will emit other VOCs when curing, so be sure to ventilate the area well during and after treatment."
R
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RicodJour wrote:

I'm less than certain that it woudld stop the outgassing but quite confident that it would reduce the rate dramatically, which as you explain below, should be quite sufficent. Diffusion though solids is a poorly understood, but well-documetned phenomenum.

In terms of outgassing organics these would include all plastics and most wood finishes, glues, cleaning agents, and maybe even wood itself. If you can smell wood, it's outgassing _something_.

Yes. That way the normal exchange of air between the house and the outdoors will keep the concentrations to a bare minimum, almost certainly well-below any level of concern.
--

FF


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On Sun, 30 Apr 2006 12:20:48 -0700, fredfighter wrote:

This is true. One thing to consider is the "efficiency" of the house. Many newer houses are very tight and air exchange is more limited than you might like.
JD
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If you wanrt to seal use one part pvc and 4 parts water.MDF is porus otherwise...mjh

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Particle board with a melamine coating on both sides off-gasses very little....till you gang drill for shelf-holes... then it becomes noticeably more toxic (to me at least).
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