McFeely's - Square no longer?


Just got an email from McFeely's touting the star drive as the next generation of wood screws. I'm wondering if there's any real advantage over square drives?
JP
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I got one too. These have been offered from other suppliers for some time now and a similar if not the same "Torx head" screw has been used in the automotive industry for a few decades now.
Any advantage? IMHO not enough for me to replace my inventory of screws with these. Apparent advantages are that the bit can be engaged at a bit more of an angle and the bit engages more quickly since the bit does not have to rotate as much to engage the screw head. Having used both in different applications the star is not nearly as big of an improvement over the square drive as the square drive was over the Philips head.
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I'll stick with their "combo head" or whatever they call it.... fits both square and phillips, so whatever I have in the drill-driver will fit...
ok, I admit that I'm lazy, but most of my stuff is more jigs than furniture or projects.. Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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Yes, they get to sell you a new set of drivers and bits.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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On Sat, 26 Aug 2006 11:11:10 -0700, Mark & Juanita

Exactly.
I used a bunch of their stainless screws that twisted off so easily that I was going to recommend that they convert to round drive to alleviate the problem.
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Wes Stewart wrote:

That surprises me - I've found McFeely's to be a good company to do business with. Stainless is softer than their non-stainless counterparts - a bit more care is needed, although not nearly so much as with, say, brass.
JP
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wrote:

I didn't say they weren't a good company to do business with, just that I've have very bad luck with their stainless screws twisting off.
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That's because most stainless screws of this type are made out of steel that a kitchen sink would be embarrassed by. There are good grades.

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Wes Stewart wrote:

I spent a part of Wednesday running in McFeely's stainless screws for replacement deck boards, 2x6 SYP, no pilot holes, and no problems, including twist-off. I've used a slew of these screws and never had a twist-off. It makes me wonder what kind of wood you're using, what kind of pilot holes (ipe sure requires pilot holes, for instance), and what kind of driver. I recently switched to an impact driver, the relatively low cost Ryobi, and I ain't never goin' back!
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wrote: [snip]

I'm building a playhouse for my granddaughter, who by the time I'm done will have moved closer, but still 200 miles away. (I knew a move was in the works, and even this one isn't permanent, so it will likely be disassembled/assembled more than once) So I'm "pre-fabbing" and assembling everything with screws here and will take it apart and move it when the time comes.
The major problem has been with the #10 - 3 1/2" FH 305 stainless, made in Taiwan screws that I'm using to tie the bottom plate (twoby DF) to the 3/4" OSB floor and PT rim joists. I'm using stainless because of the PT lumber.
McFeely's "NoCoRode" finish isn't. At least I don't feel confortable using them because they don't look so good after having been installed for a while and then removed. And I do have to consider removal in the future, which is not a usual situation, but mine nevertheless.
The "driver" is a very tired old 9V Makita drill/driver, which I finally ordered a new battery for yesterday. Hardly overpowering.
For comparison, I had a few stainless screws left over that I believe that I bought from the Borg years ago. These were made (packaged) by Midwest Precision Products. Didn't have a problem with them but unfortunately I can't find them anymore.
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Snip
Wes:
If you are having problems with our screws, we want to know about it. We torque test every production batch to make sure that our screws are as strong as possible. If you still have the original box you will find a lot number on the label which should help us track down the problem. Remember that stainless steel just isn't as strong as hardened steel, which is why we recommend increasing the wire size when using stainless. Please call my Technical Director, Darin Lawrence, for assistance.
Jim Ray, President McFeely's Square Drive Screws 1-800-443-7937
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Wes Stewart wrote:

Sorry - I didn't mean to put words in your mouth. I'd email someone there about your problem. I'm confident they'll make it right.
JP
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Yes. There is not a lot you can do to change a screw but they make up for that in driver stiles. They must have an interest in screwdriver manufacturing.
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I too received their new catalog and nearly fell over when I saw the Torx head being touted as the next generation. I have had nothing but problems with Torx screws and in fact, any time I have to remove one, I'm sure to replace with something else. I know it's not woodworking but my Jeep is covered in them. Eveytime I have to remove one, I end up having to get creative such as drilling it out, welding a nut to it, etc... I'm slowly getting rid of them all. I'll stick with the square drive for strong holding applications and standard phillips for those less than important locations. Cheers, cc
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I've also had many problems with Torx head screws. Part of it seems to be never having the right size bit to turn the dumb thing. If it's not JUST right, you run the risk of spinning the bit.
Give me a good Phillips head any day.
Puckdropper
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Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
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