Material for garage door

My garage door served notice today that it's in need of replacement. It's your basic 2-car sectional overhead type. Rather than buy another one, I'm thinking that it would be fun to make one, using the old one as a pattern--the hardware all seems to be good so no reason I can think of not to move it over to the replacement.
The question is, what to make it out of. The old one was jummywood and masonite and lasted 30 years or so. Was thinking about a composite rather than all one material--maybe use ash for the top rail that carries most of the load (and that let go on the existing door), and cypress for the bottom rail that is a bit rotted and maybe spruce for the rest to save weight?
Anybody have any other ideas? Or any reason I should _not_ do this?
Always _something_.
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J. Clarke wrote:

Cedar or better yet, redwood.
I built a house in '81 and had a plain flat sectional door put in. The installer used some of the house siding - 1 x 6 vertical cedar, rough side out and installed it over the plain ply faced door. He beveled the cuts between sections, maybe 30 degrees at most, so water wouldn't get in. When the door was closed, there was no noticeable gap between sections.
I had an 18' wide door put in instead of two 8' singles with 2' wide wall between. The 18' opening is the only way to go in new construction, even though it required a glue-lam as a header. The door was on the heavy side...
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"J. Clarke" wrote:

Case closed.
SFWIW, where do you plan on being in 2038?
Lew
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Be careful of the springs, be very careful.
Something else to consider, what would it cost to build it your self? I replaced my wood product door several years with an R12 Wayne Dalton Steel door. It keeps things very comfy in the winter with no drafts they seal tight with weather stripping. Additionally they sell a door opener that mounts directly over the door opening with no steel bar or motor housing running to the middle of the garage. Leaves wide open floor to ceiling space between the door support rails.
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Probably a lot cheaper to buy one than to buy the material. Even if you figure your labor at $1 an hour, automation can beat it. Think insulated steel. maintenance free
OTOH, if you want a fancy showpiece with natural wood, custom carving on the panels, etc, go for it.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Running the numbers, I'm inclined to agree with you. The only way it makes any kind of economic sense is if I go the jummywood and masonite route and even there it's close to the price of an installed steel door.
Cost of my labor doesn't enter into it. On the other hand finding the time to do it . . .
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J. Clarke wrote:

Another vote to buy, unless you're wanting something unique.
I went though the same decision process 5 years ago, and ended up with the stamped steel door. It looks good, is relatively light, and won't swell or shrink in the weather. I skipped the insulation, because my garage is unheated, uninsulated, and is well ventilated.
Installation was ~ $150, including complete track replacement and hauling away the old door.
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On Wed, 23 Apr 2008 18:43:04 -0400, "J. Clarke"

As others have stated it's probably better to go with the ready made one, however, if you should decide to build your own be aware... you will need to weigh the door when your done and size your springs accordingly. Your present springs may or may not be correct for the new door. Another added cost (though minimal) and perhaps another reason to go with the new factory built unit.
Lenny
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Hi, You might want to do what I did before I moved. I made one side of the two cars garage. It took me more than a week as I took my own sweet time from start to finished. Total cost less than $120 excluding hardware and router bits. If I had bought the door and replaced it myself it would cost more than $600. The rail and stile are made from Southern Pine, the panels from HD. I picked the straightest, least knot 2x6 studs. Bought matching rail & stile router bits from Ebay to match the original shape.
I saved a bundle, and learned a lot from the experienced and have posted 4 pics of the door in abpw.

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And a fine job you did too!
D grade fir is another option. A local store has it and you can pick through the pile. The store is in League City Texas.
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