Marc Spagnuolo - The Money Whisperer!

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It appears that talking about woodworking pays pretty well! I'm sure most of you here are familiar with 'The Wood Whisperer' website/podcast/blog: http://www.thewoodwhisperer.com
I just watched his video 'Dream Shop Build'
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8mkwbqObws8

What's your guess of how much a shop of that size (1800 sq. ft.) and quality set him back? Not talking about all the Powermatic and green festering tools within, just the finished building. $250K ?
Wouldn't think you'd find any Harbor Freight in that shop. ^_^
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On Sun, 04 Nov 2012 23:52:40 +0000, Wood Butcher

Careful. Doesn't that last name look like it might be...Sicilian? <wink>

Yeah, at least a quarter mil.

Prolly not. His loss. ;)
-- The great thing about getting older is that you don't lose all the other ages you've been. -- Madeleine L'Engle
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On Sun, 04 Nov 2012 16:57:19 -0800, Larry Jaques

Remember he has sponsors. May have a lot to do with why it's set up for filming.
Mike M
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"Mike M" wrote:

He'd need a roll off to handle that junk.
A dumpster just isn't going to cut it.
Lew
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On 11/4/2012 10:31 PM, Mike M wrote:

Always glad to see someone carry on successfully with a dream.
(While I don't begrudge responding to a call for donations about a year ago, mainly because I suspect a large part of it went to address medical issues with their new born son, it would have been nice to receive a follow-up acknowledgement/thank you of some sort).
That notwithstanding, Marc and Nicole are good, well intentioned folks and it is nice to see them on the road to making a living in this business.
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Last update: 4/15/2010
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On Sun, 04 Nov 2012 23:52:40 +0000, Wood Butcher

Let's revise my estimate for his new shop. I'd bet it's closer to $400k, with all the extra work, tile roof, stucco, and cement work.

I was watching this video and saw the patio supports. They looked all wrong to me. What do you make of the mess at 10:28 in the video? I see severely cracked boards not fastened to the J-bolt, like they were put together the wrong way. It looks like white wood on the sill plate, not PT (except for the tiny j-bolted sections 9" long.)
-- While we have the gift of life, it seems to me that only tragedy is to allow part of us to die - whether it is our spirit, our creativity, or our glorious uniqueness. -- Gilda Radner
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On 11/4/2012 9:14 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

I certainly would not have done it that way, but this is the construction business and nothing is ever picture perfect for any number of reasons, so I don't see any need to denigrate the overall work based on the split end of a tuba four, from too damned many nail gun shots, in a patio post.
Besides, macho, rapid fire, nailgun use apparently goes a long way to making up for a small penis in some cultures.
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I was denigrating the patio -post- construction materials and methods, not the entire job, suh. The j-bolts are holding down an 8" piece of wood, nothing more. That surprised me. <shrug>

Damnit, coffee everywhere...
-- While we have the gift of life, it seems to me that only tragedy is to allow part of us to die - whether it is our spirit, our creativity, or our glorious uniqueness. -- Gilda Radner
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On 11/4/2012 9:14 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Sill plate is PT and you can't see if there are 4 anchor bolts or not. The splitting is probably quite normal, wet PT wood in Arizona. Non PT studs not making ground contact is pretty common.
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wrote:

If that's PT, it must be 1/32" deep at most. That entire front left end is WHITE.

I've always replaced boards which did that, and I haven't seen many. 99% of the time, they don't split much, if any. 2 splits and it's replaced, in my projects.
BTW, -wet- PT wood seldom splits, in my experience, but I use screws much more often than a nailgun.
-- While we have the gift of life, it seems to me that only tragedy is to allow part of us to die - whether it is our spirit, our creativity, or our glorious uniqueness. -- Gilda Radner
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On 11/5/2012 8:58 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Did you miss the green on the 2x4's with the anchor bolts coming through them?

Have you ever been to Arizona? That is where the aircraft bone yard is at. No need to rust roof anything because of the dry climate. I think I would be surprised to not see splits after a short while. PT is typically wet when you get it, cut the end off to exposed <5% humidity and you get the splits.

Again, in Arizona, little to no humidity, a fresh cut wet board is going to split/check/dry out quick, the multiple nails probably did not help matters. And you live along the west coast in humid conditions?

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wrote:

No. Have you ever cut a PT board? The cut end looks like it was soaked in green dye on the outside. Which brings up another thing. I always paint the cut ends of PT with preservative (I can still buy the green, but I use brown deck stain with preservatives for the brown) but they don't. It irks me, because if you need a treated board, all surfaces need to be treated, just like cement board. Ask Swingy what code is on that.

California wasn't _that_ much cooler or drier. Yeah, I lived in Phoenix for a year. Brutal.

Nailsplits are not checks. And it's actually drier in the summer up here in OR than it was in CA, about 15%. The west coast doesn't have the humidity you have down there in the south, even during a rainstorm. <g> I do NOT miss any of the humid places I've lived in or visited. Phoenix (during the '72 floods), Little Rock, Fort Smith, Fort Lauderdale, Love Field (you're flyover country, boy ;), NYC, D.C., Philly.
-- While we have the gift of life, it seems to me that only tragedy is to allow part of us to die - whether it is our spirit, our creativity, or our glorious uniqueness. -- Gilda Radner
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On 11/6/2012 8:05 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

It should look like that if the treatment went all the way inside the board, very often it does not.
Which brings up another thing. I

If the board is properly treated, why treat the fresh cut ends?

I saw 3 splits, 2 nails and only one split in line with the right side nail.

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wrote:

I -know- you're not that dumb, Leon. <sigh>
-- While we have the gift of life, it seems to me that only tragedy is to allow part of us to die - whether it is our spirit, our creativity, or our glorious uniqueness. -- Gilda Radner
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On 11/6/2012 7:22 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

So you don't know either?
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wrote:

Pfffffft! Crom, of course I know. I stated it in the post to Swingy, too. Pressure treating is a surface treatment that's supposed to be-- but isn't very--penetrating. Go to that site I linked and read up, boy. And pay attention next time, huh? I'dve thought you'd learn from the little cement board talk we had. ;)
-- While we have the gift of life, it seems to me that only tragedy is to allow part of us to die - whether it is our spirit, our creativity, or our glorious uniqueness. -- Gilda Radner
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On 11/8/2012 7:41 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

You might want to do a little more research.
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On 11/6/2012 8:30 AM, Leon wrote: ...

From SYP Association web site...

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On 11/6/2012 8:30 AM, Leon wrote: ...

From SYP Association web site...

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On 11/7/2012 8:47 AM, dpb wrote:

And, according to AWPA M4, thick sapwood species (SYP) that appear to be well treated and contain little or no heartwood do not necessarily require field treatment ... practical aspect is that using AWPA U1 certified PT SYP makes it a non issue for most purposes.
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