Maple hardwood floors: WARNED about gaps & buckling

Page 1 of 2  
One of the contractors, whom I think is honest, is warning me again using Maple for my hardwood floors. He says that he's see no end of expansion in the summer and contraction in the winter issues.
Basically, large gaps in winter. And if put in during the winter: significant buckling during the summer. "except if you use 'engineered maple' which is a thin veneer which only allows refinishing once".
I have no idea. Can anyone shed any light on this?
THANKS!!!!!!!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thomas G. Marshall wrote:

Listen to the man. Maple is not the most stable of woods, and it's going to move quite a bit in response to changes in temperature and humidity. If this is a problem in your area and you *must* have Maple I would suggest following the man's advice and considering engineered flooring instead.
--
Free bad advice available here.
To reply, eat the taco.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Find a better contractor who knows how to properly install HW florrs with appropriate expansion gaps under the base boards.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thomas G. Marshall wrote:

Maple makes a beautiful floor, but does take longer to stabilize ... up to a few years in some climates.
Acclimation, in the environment it's going to be installed in prior to installation, is VERY important with maple; it performs better in an environment that doesn't change much in RH; when finishing you don't want to just throw stain on it as it blotches ... much better to use a clear topcoat; and you better expect seasonal changes to cause gaps during periods of low RH.
IME as a builder, if maple flooring buckles, it has been installed improperly by not taking into account its inherent dimensional instability ... gaps, you will most certainly have to live with even when properly installed. You may also find you have to hide larger expansion gaps around the perimeter with thicker baseboard and shoe molding, which can be an additional, unplanned for expense.
Simply put, unstained maple makes a beautiful floor providing you know what to expect and are willing to live with its vagaries for a couple of years or so, or longer ...
Just my experience ... YMMV.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thomas G. Marshall wrote:

There are thousands of basketball courts all over the country which don't seem to have such problems.
Unless it's very wide plank and/or one of the softer maples I can't imagine it being an issue if it's installed properly (which includes acclimatization, house already in climate-control stage, etc.).
<http://www.maplefloor.org/literature/residential.htm
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have seen buckled basketball courts. I remember the one in our grade school would come up at least a foot, in one corner, each summer. It took them a few years to get it fixed.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

...
For every one w/ a problem I'll bet there are hundreds that haven't had any.
As far as personal experience I know of six elementary schools, two middle schools and two high schools here alone that have never had any problems in from 20 to 80 years.
More than likely there was a specific problem w/ that installation that caused a problem of that magnitude and I'd certainly not expect anything like that in a residential installation.
It's not like there _can't_ be an issue but I'd ask for evidence they're particularly trouble-prone before I made any issue over it as a material. If they had been such it's unlikely they would have continued as the floor of choice for so long for such facilities where costs are an issue.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The point is that it is not unheard of.

I wouldn't "expect" it anywhere, but it does happen.

Cost isn't all that much of an issue in this application, since there isn't much choice. However, it it were a constant problem the cost wouldn't matter; it simply wouldn't be used. I would agree that if it's installed properly, there is unlikely to be a problem but it *can* happen. I'd still use it if it's what I wanted.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote: ...

Did I _EVER_ say "never"???? :(
(Hint--no, never...) I simply pointed out there are oodles of maple floors and by far the majority of them don't have such issues so it would seem the OP's installer's premise is flawed.

See above... :(

Isn't that what I just got through saying????

Ditto... :(
plonk.
--


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm seeing lots of problems:yes vs problems:no, but I'm not seeing anyone talk about local climates. Hardwood floors in CA are seldom a problem cuz it rare gets below freezing in most of the state. I'm sure that's not the case in MN or ME.
nb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm in NH and we have solid red oak floors (sorry, not maple) that do not have gaps in the winter, or buckle in the summer. Of course, we also have partial humidity control inside the house :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I am also in NH, on the coast. Been here for 2 years with maple floors. No problem, other then then wondering if I can pull out the birdseye pieces and use them in my boxes....
Go for it.
-Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Installed over concrete CAN be an issue.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And even more bowling alleys.
scott
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Scott Lurndal wrote:

If bowling alley lanes are NOT warped, how do you explain all my gutter-balls? Eh?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
HeyBub wrote:

It's a poor workman blames his tools . . .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Talent.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Try not to pass out drunk with your balls hanging in the gutter?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robatoy wrote:

Everything's got to be somewhere.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

We have an "Engeneered" Maple floor in our master bathroom. Absolutely no problems in the last 6 years EXCEPT where the water drips down behind the WC from the shower curtain, if the curtain gets pushed outside the tub when getting out of the tub. You may want to consider an Engeneered Maple hard wood floor.
The veneer is about 1/8" thick.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.