manual drill press

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Older tool ideas still being made? Motor free?
Curious, anyone know if there is a such thind as a bench-top type of drill press that is manualy used, not involving the use of an electric motor?
Reason is, I [want] to do small woodworking and construction in my apartment*, including the use of a morticing attachment if possible, for dove- tail corners.
Other tool idea is a small, yet high quality miter box of maybe around 15" blade length, with movements that can go in all directions. The nice one I know of, Sears item #00936343000 http://www.sears.com/ (search engine) Is twice too long with it's two foot blade.
Peices being worked with will be cherry or mahogany, 0.25" (or so) thick by several inches long and up to 1.5" wide. I would like to find such tool brand(s) that are decent, or any that exist please.
Thanks all,
Alex
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AArDvarK asks:

http://www.micromark.com/
Not older tools, but smaller. For the hand operated drill press in small, light material, I suggest a Stanley push drill. They're still made.
Micromark is probably the premier catalog house for model making sized tools, power and hand. I haven't looked recently, but the used to have a small miter box that might do as you wish, though you may be adding more specifications to it than it is possible to get.
Charlie Self "If the misery of the poor be caused not by the laws of nature, but by our institutions, great is our sin." Charles Darwin
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Thanks, but this is closer to the idea, like a drill press: http://www.americanartifacts.com/smma/advert/ay249.htm Click on the links to see the other two pictures. A modern "something like that" would be perfect, especially if a gear train speeds up the spinning. Micromark still has the mini miter-rite, too small though.
Still in the Poser group?
Alex
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this is a closer idea:
http://www.patented-antiques.com/images/WEB%20Sale%20Catagories/WEB%20Tools/Drill%20Page/drills_w1/drill03/d_table_grn.jpg
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I don't think they make these any more....at least not to my knowledge. You can however, every once in a while, find these used on Ebay. I'm a semi-neander myself, but I think that buying a good used electric drill press is better. Just as quiet, one hand free to hold work against fence, depth stop, multi-speed, etc. etc. Why get an antique drill press, except for the novelty of it?
Layne
wrote:

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Why? Well, it's a specialty application, but I spent a week one summer working for a blacksmith. We were set up in the artisan's area of a medieval re-enactment camp. The nearest electrical feed was several miles away.
I met more interesting artisans that week, because we had the antique drill press. I helped drill hardwood, green wood, softwoods, four different kinds of metal, bone, and I don't know what-all.
There's nothing more popular than a man with a manual drill press in the off-grid desert.
The jeweler was particularly entertaining.
"So, how far down does your chuck go?"
"I think it goes to zero."
"Let's try it."
It was an amazing picture. Large, bulky 19th century gearbox. Huge chuck. Teeny, tiny carbide bit, carefully cranked.
But how often do you need drill-press in the middle of the woods, eh?
Will
Layne <> wrote in message

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That sounds like a great experience, and I'd love to see that drill too.
Alex
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On 21 Apr 2004 08:21:14 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@pobox.com (Bill McNutt) wrote:

snippytisnip
Hey! You attended a *Medival re-enactment camp* with a "19th century" manual drill press!!!!???? A bit anachronistic, don't cha think? :-)
Layne

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Layne <> wrote in message (Bill McNutt) wrote:

Heh. Guilty.
It was a very informal gathering. As long as we were setting stuff on fire and then hitting it with hammers, they were happy.
Bill
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AArDvarK wrote:

Maybe you get find an old eggbeater drill at a garage sale or on Ebay and use it with a portable drill guide, like this one: <http://www.rockler.com/findit.cfm?page $05&sid998>.
Why do you need a hand-powered drill press? If size is a problem, there are small electric drill presses such as the Proxxon <http://shop.woodcraft.com/Woodcraft/product_family.asp?family_idI02&refcode INFROO&PRID=Frgl4902>, the Microlux <http://www.ares-server.com/Ares/Ares.asp?MerchantID=RET01229&Action talog&Type=Product&ID631>, or, (if you're rolling in money) the Levin <http://www.levinlathe.com/shop/product_info.php/products_id/31 .
--
--
Steve

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<http://shop.woodcraft.com/Woodcraft/product_family.asp?family_idI02&refcode INFROO&PRID=Frgl4902>,
<http://www.ares-server.com/Ares/Ares.asp?MerchantID=RET01229&Action talog&Type=Product&ID631>,
as in an apartment one does not need the noise bothering neighbors to the point of getting evicted. And an electric drill will flay sawdust everywhere. Don't need either one. Thanks for the great links!
Alex
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AArDvarK responds:

Drill presses aren't very noisy. I guess a large one might peel the skin off something, but sawdust is hard to flay (no skin). It doesn't produce sawdust anyway, but curled cuttings that are easily controlled.
Charlie Self "Abstainer: a weak person who yields to the temptation of denying himself a pleasure." Ambrose Bierce
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Well it seems you guys are right ... I had a small DP packed in it's original box in my closet, el cheapo but I got it out, set it up and it is very quiet! I was surprised and pleased with that. It's only got about a 4" swing area and a 38mm wide qill but it should be perfect. It might take a mortising attachment but the max distance, nose to table, is 6.8", without the chuck. Minor.
Alex
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A good drill press, even a large one should not produce enough noise that your neighbors would even know you had it. My Jet is one of the quietest tools in my shop; I can't imagine it would even register compared to a neighboring apartment's stereo system.
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More than likely true, thank you. Alex
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says...

a Google on "Goodell-Pratt", "Goodell Brothers", and "Goodell Manufacturing". Heck, just search on "Goodell".
They're old, but they're good :-).
--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

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Great thanks!
Alex
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Do a search on a "post drill" and you may find what you are looking for. There are usually 1 or 2 for auction on ebay at any given time. I can't help with the miterbox question. I have a Jorgenson but it also has a blade about 24"
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Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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Thanks, but tell me, do you know what country the Jorgensen is made in? How is the cutting quality?
Alex
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Jorgensen is a US company but they may import the saw for all I know. With the supplied blade the cut quality is acceptable, about what you'd expect from a hand saw. It is not as smooth as a good table saw blade would make, for instance. Accuracy is good. When I bought it I thought I'd use it more than I do. Most of the time I use my tablesaw now.
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Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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