Makita drill on Amazon

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For those who are interested in a good deal on a cordless drill:
For today only Amazon has Makita LXFD01CW 18-Volt Compact Lithium-Ion Cordless 1/2-Inch Driver-Drill Kit, list $378, on sale for $149.99, free shipping.
(Amazon.com product link shortened) &pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=1YBT04QFC6RJ2WXF8C1A
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Yeah, I saw that... $189 at Toolbarn, $199 at Home Depot, not such a deal once you add in shipping. It is always a joke that they show SRP at $300+.
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OK, I can be an idiot... I thought it was $179 and didn't see free shipping. Tail between legs.
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On 6/1/2011 11:48 AM, Just Wondering wrote:

Unless I'm sorely mistaken, that is the lesser, DIY version of Makita.
If you're really serious about your drills and use them in your work, check out these before you leap:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)06952729&sr=1-1
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On 6/1/2011 12:27 PM, Swingman wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)06952729&sr=1-1
hobbiests (like myself) as well as those who rely on their tools to put food on their tables and a roof over their heads. The latter can usually afford to pay the higher price for the higher quality item, while the former benefit from the best price on a good tool that's a notch down from heavy-duty professional stuff.
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On 6/1/2011 2:02 PM, Just Wondering wrote:

... and many don't even know there is a difference. Thus my post.
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the job requires. Buying tools not up to the job can cost a lot in terms of time, safety and multiple purchases of an inadequate tool.
I put my money where it is best used. Whether that is a cheapie or a big, expensive professional model (Or something in between.) . Although I reserve the right to lust after big, professional tools I can not afford or justify buying.
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There's not a big difference in the specs between the two flavors, other than the higher end set's driver drill also is a hammer drill, and its impact driver has a bit more torque. Other than that it's mainly a difference in battery size and run time. You wouldn't go wrong choosing either model and you could upgrade the batteries at a later date (though it makes more sense to buy them initially).
R
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OTOH, the professional has to justify expenses with income. Hobbiests don't have to justify anything, well, other than to their SWMBO.
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On 6/2/2011 8:23 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

What pays when buying any tool, and regardless of user status, is to question what was sacrificed, with regard to engineering and component quality, to justify the reduction in MSRP for very similar models of the same brand.
A more robust tool for $100 more and that will last just three years longer will put you ahead of the game at a reasonable yearly cost, versus replacing a cheaper tool earlier ... whether you're a hobbyist or professional ... taking exception to that fact, as the OP did, is nothing more than nitpicking/missing the point, an apparent family trait.
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That whole 'hobbyist vs pro' argument varies a lot when the type of tool is taken into consideration. A drill, impact driver is less likely to be all that different as either the pro or hobbyist drill will make a hole and drive a screw somehow, eventually.... The Big Diff shows up in say... a jig saw? A ROS? Even circular saws. Oh, and beltsanders... BIG difference in beltsanders... the cheap shit don't work, period.
I love a good tool as much as the next guy, but when it comes to drills, the cordless varieties are pretty good for under $ 100.00, if I need to do anything serious, like driving 30 Tapcons, I will run an extension and uncork my Magnum HoleShooter Milwaukee. That cord simply doesn't bother me. On the other end of the spectrum, I'm upsidedown inside a cabinet installation: "Is the battery fresh? Does it have a LED? Is it light? Is it powerful enough?".. my 12 volt Lion Bosch's (I have an impact, small pistol-type and an angle driver) almost always fit the bill. In betwixt those extremes, I have a $99 Porter Cable 18V NiCd with two batteries, two-speed, adjustable clutch and tons of balls. If the thing breaks, or the batteries die...off to the trashbin.
Now having said all that.. if I had nothing..and start from scratch, AND I could only have one, and it HAD to be cordless, I'd get one of those Makita kits (The LXMMCVVVXTRVS??) or a Milwaukee kit (I like those Milwaukee people a lot)... and I would get the best I could afford.
Ultimately, the word 'longevity' doesn't exist in the cordless world. Them batteries will always keep making decisions for you... One 14.4 volt NiCd for $ 89.00 for a 6-year-old drill vs $ 99.00 for a whole Porter Cable 18 volt kit with TWO batteries.
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On 6/3/2011 10:06 AM, Robatoy wrote:

Agreed, although IME there has always been a big difference in cordless drills when it comes to quality/longevity. My original Makita cordle$$, bought 25 years ago, lasted over a dozen years before I was forced to replace it ... it also fell off a dozen ladders during that time and never missed a beat. My Dewalt 18v, bought to replace it, is still kicking at around ten, although there have been quite a few battery rebuilds in the interim.
Basically, I've never had a under $100 cordless drill last as long as either of those, and I've bought a couple or three.

That comes from you having the wisdom/experience to chose the correct tool for the job. :)
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Well, errmm, yes. <G> But how many hobbyists tackle heavy-duty projects with hobbyists tools? "Well, I got this 3.1 volt $19.00 Flack & Pecker drill/concrete mixer combo and whilst trying to build a 2000 sq ft deck out of 'free' railroad ties...the fukkin thing went up and broke on me! Then...it is likely for me to say "you need a better tool!" The reply is then likely to be: "you are a tool snob!!!"
...and so it goes.... . . . I think I will have another cold drink.
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On 6/03/11 2:07 PM, Robatoy wrote:

SWMBO always makes a bit of a racket when I buy a new tool, it was funny last weekend, she wanted to drill some holes in the bottom of some rubbermaid buckets she uses for gardening waste/weeds etc so the water will drain out. I said sure, grabed my 14.4V Dewalt cordless, popped a one inch hole saw onto it, and handed it to her.
She came back a bit later, and said it was awesome. I know it isn't the best thing out there, but it will hold its own against a lot of them.
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wrote:

For short few years, Bosch had a green line of tools, basically copies of the blue bodied ones. BUT..... The belt sander had bushings on the motor shaft in the green line and proper ball bearings in the blue incarnation. The drills had white plastic gears, vs the steel ones in the blue line. Thee are a ton of examples like that. I have two non-restricted air blowers. They are identical in all aspects. One I bought 20+ years ago for $ 30.00, the second was $7.00. One has a Blue Point logo (From The Snap-On truck) the other I bought at Canadian Tire.
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On 6/4/2011 11:21 PM, Robatoy wrote:
> For short few years, Bosch had a green line of tools, basically copies > of the blue bodied ones. > BUT..... The belt sander had bushings on the motor shaft in the green > line and proper ball bearings in the blue incarnation. > The drills had white plastic gears, vs the steel ones in the blue > line. Thee are a ton of examples like that. > I have two non-restricted air blowers. They are identical in all > aspects. One I bought 20+ years ago for $ 30.00, the second was $7.00. > One has a Blue Point logo (From The Snap-On truck) the other I bought > at Canadian Tire.
My SIL from Yorkshire couldn't believe I was using Bosch tools. All the Bosch he'd ever seen in the UK at the time were green, and cheap POS'.
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One interesting observation was that the 'green Bosch' in-line beltsander reappeared many years later as a Ryobi.
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wrote:

Sometimes you can get quite a bit out of a cheap tool.
Some 30 years ago, in our first home, we needed more sun in the yard (50x100ft). So I cut down a pine tree (trunk about 10-11" in diameter), partly while standing on the edge of the roof since the tree missed piercing the corner of the roof by an inch or two, and I didn't want the tree to take out the roof. After that the cherry tree had its turn. Near the ground must have been at least 18" in diameter. I still remember cutting off the last big limb, and thinking - this is not right, the ladder is standing to the left of both where I am cutting and the trunk. That was rectified successfully, thank whoever. Unfortunately, the $99.99 14" or so electric chainsaw died before I got the trunk down. Had to find someone with a real chainsaw.
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I got a lot of life out of my trusty Remington 14" chainsaw. And when it died at age 20+ this year, I got a $40 HF 14" chainsaw to replace it. It has already taken down two thick old apple trees and I'm ready to limb a maple and a sweetgum shortly.
The old Rem died of plastic failure. The bar swings up from the proper position, but the saw still runs like a champ. Scary, wot?
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207.246.207.32:

Sometimes all you need is the cheap tool. I've turned hundreds of nuts with the cheap wrenches from Menards (they're cheap enough to buy a dozen sets or so and put them in dedicated places) and measured thousands of voltages with the HF multimeter (cheap enough to dedicate as well).
For anything with a motor, buying a really good one and only crying once makes a lot of sense. (Anyone else hate loud motors?)
Puckdropper
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