Makita 5277NB Hypoid Saw Deal at Coastal Tool


Noticed that Coastal Tool has this saw for $79 plus shipping right now. I won't be doing any framing or construction, just want one to cut down plywood sheets. I'm a little concerned about the weight, and it doesn't appear to have a brake. But for $79, seems like it could be a good deal.
I'd appreciate comments from those who have this saw, what do you like, dislike, etc.
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Heavy, but powerful. I love mine. Wish I could have bought it for that price. I gave a hundred and a quarter.
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Sounds like a great deal on a good brand, but I have a question to prove my ignorance:
What's the difference between this "hypoid" saw and a regular circular saw?
Thanks! Squanklin
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Hypoid saws are used by framers on the West Coast. Sidewinder saws are used by East Coast framers.
In a hypoid saw, the motor is in-line (parallel) with the blade. The hypoid refers to the gear (a 90 deg. gear, like in a rear differential) that connects the motor to the blade arbor.
Dave
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Gearing. The hypoid saw uses hypoid gears. Similar to a worm drive, but teeth are curved.
-j
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Ok, then. What's the difference in hypoid gears and what they do and whatever sort of gear system comes on a circular saw and what it does? (Oh, and what's a worm drive?)
Please remember, I'm ignorant in this area and need more background information.
Thanks! Squanklin
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Worm drive has what looks a bit like a corkscrew (rather than a worm) on the motorshaft. This is the worm gear. It meshes to an ordinary spur gear with teeth around its edge. The purpose is to turn the rotation of the motor 90 degrees. This means the axis of the motor is parallel to your cut - allowing a bigger motor than a regular circular saw (it would be too wide and unbalanced).
Hypoid gears are similare but are closer to what you would consider a bevel gear. The motorshaft has a toothed cone on the end of it and this meshes with a beveled gear which drives the blade. The curvature is part of the design to more efficiently transmit the power. Because you are meshing two curved surfaces you can curve the teeth to have a larger area of contact which means it will wear better among other things.
You can find pictures of both types on the web.
http://www.mech.uwa.edu.au/DANotes/gears/intro/intro.html
-j

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On 17 Mar 2005 08:50:09 -0800, "Dave in Indy"

I don't have the saw, but I've been in Coastal three times this week, (twice today <G>) and they're a class act.
Barry
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