Making your own router plate

Page 1 of 2  
What kind of material do you prefer? 1/4 inch MDF, polycarbonate, some type of sheet metal?
Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/12/2013 8:32 AM, Michael wrote:

1/4" or thicker aluminum. When I think of "sheet metal" I think of stuff far to thin to properly support a router.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/12/2013 7:32 AM, Michael wrote:

Solid Pnenolic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, September 12, 2013 7:04:18 AM UTC-7, Leon wrote:

(Phenolic plastic, like linen-reinforced Micarta, is a pretty good rigid choice). You can duplicate a base plate pretty easily, by chucking a dowel in your router, and using a solid-carbide router bit in a second router, with the same diameter as the dowel.
The trick is, to mount the base-plate material, form a center hole by plunge-cutting, then making a pin-router jig of router #1 with a dowel and the holed but uncut baseplate, and cut it with router #2 which has a fully-formed base plate.
You can put a collar on the dowel to guide an oversize circle cut, making a large circular baseplate.
I've done this with phenolic (to make a matching-diameter baseplate for a small router), but it should work with aluminum as well.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/12/2013 5:32 AM, Michael wrote:

Why make your own ???
http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/smarthtml/pages/routacc1.html#All_In_One_router_plate_kit_anchor
or
http://www.ptreeusa.com/routerPlates.htm
Those inserts are very important.
You can't make a decent one for $30.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, September 12, 2013 9:54:14 AM UTC-5, Pat Barber wrote:

I'm too cheap to pay that much for a table plate.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pat Barber wrote:

------------------------------------------------- Michael wrote:

------------------------------------------------------ As Ben once said, you are being penny wise and pound foolish.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 12 Sep 2013 07:54:14 -0700, Pat Barber wrote:

Well, yes, but you don't need to buy one. I took the baseplate off my router and put a bushing in it to match the router plate opening. Centered the router to the plate just fine. Of course, you have to be sure your router is centered in its base plate to start with :-).
--
This message was for rec.woodworking - if it appears in homeownershub
they ripped it off.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/12/13 9:54 AM, Pat Barber wrote:

No, but you can make two. :-)
I got 3/4' Phenolic sheet from Woodcraft for (if memory serves) under $25 and made two router insert plates.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/12/13 7:32 AM, Michael wrote:

phenolic resin
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Can you say why? I always disliked the thickness of phenolic resin. Yes, that thickness assists in keeping something like a router in place, but the weight of most routers was sufficient in keeping any metal plates in place for me.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/12/13 10:49 AM, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

I never though weight alone was a qualifying aspect of a router plate, for the reason you gave. Strength, rigidity, smoothness, non-dulling (bits) are the qualifiers. You are obviously concerned with thickness and I completely understand why. With some routers, that 3/4" can be a problem with getting most height out of the bit.
Two solutions: Use thinner phenolic-- it comes in many thicknesses. I can't speak from experience, but I'm pretty sure it's still pretty rigid down to 1/2". Route a recess in the 3/4' to receive the router base. You can use a center point and pin for your router to mill and perfect circle at whatever depth you like and the clear out the rest freehand.
I don't like aluminum, because even thought it technically is softer than a router bit, it still dulls it. Also, it can bend if dropped and once bent, it's never going back straight. Back to dulling. I like to make the smallest possibly hole in my plates. I don't like using plastic inserts for different bits. Odds are most of my cutting will be done with smaller bits. If I have a larger bit to use, I like to raise it up through the plate, while running, while it cuts its own whole through the plate.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's a good point, something you can't/shouldn't do with a metal place. I never thought of that, guess it's the closed equivalent of zero clearance insert.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 12 Sep 2013 05:32:49 -0700 (PDT), Michael


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ti1o-QKriBM

$7 acrylic plate sold as trivet. Haven't tried it, mine is a Lee Valley round phenolic plate:
http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?pA776&cat=1,43000,51208
But that used to cost a whole lot less. Today I'd be looking elsewhere.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/12/13 11:18 AM, Jim Weisgram wrote:

I often use those solid plastic cutting boards for making jigs.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, September 12, 2013 5:32:49 AM UTC-7, Michael wrote:

Old school approach is to use a piece of an old laminate counter top. New school, visit Woodpeckers and spend $100 and get a full set of inserts along with it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/12/13 11:41 AM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

There's something to be said about going totally ghetto and working with it for a while to determine what you really want and need before spending the cash.
I built quite a few large bookcases with all the molding and trim work using my router screwed to the bottom of a makeshift 1/2" melamine table top. I screwed fences and feather boards right down to the melamine. :-)
Doing it like this helped me determine which of the shiny, expensive router table features were 'necessary' and which were window dressing.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Please totally forget about MDF. Ditto particle board, wafer board, OSB and fiberboard.
Suitable materials would be phenolic, polycarbonate, aluminum, iron.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/12/13 12:04 PM, dadiOH wrote:

I would take polycarbonate out of that mix. It's too "melty" for my taste.
And I hope you meant 'steel' instead of iron. :-p
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 12 Sep 2013 19:58:59 +0000, Edward A. Falk wrote:

I thought making jigs *was* part of woodworking :-).
--
This message was for rec.woodworking - if it appears in homeownershub
they ripped it off.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.