Making tenons

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I must have read a thousand articles and looked at many variations of jigs that produce a tenon.
I have never come up with a jig that I liked that produced a tenon in a reasonable amount of time.
I always end up at the table saw with a miter guage and a stop block.
Most of the time, I end up with a pretty fair tenon but because of the amount of movement in the tablesaw method, you can end up with a tenon that is not "exactly" like all his brothers.
A good case in point is right now....
I'm building a coffee table for an aunt of mine.
She just had to have a "Mission Style" with all those damn slats in the ends of the table.
That means 14 slats(7 per end) with 28 very small tenons.
The slat material is 1 1/8 " wide and 1/2" thick.
That means I end up with a very thin 1/4" tenon and very small shoulders. It also means I need to cut 28 very small mortises.
I keep thinking that there must be a router jig that is suitable for this operation, but I don't seem to ever find one(other than the Multirouter or Leigh M&T jig) that would work for assembly line processing.
What do all the troops use for this operation ????
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Pat Barber wrote:
> I must have read a thousand articles and looked at > many variations of jigs that produce a tenon. > > I have never come up with a jig that I liked that > produced a tenon in a reasonable amount of time. > > I always end up at the table saw with a miter guage > and a stop block.
Either that or use a jig and make a cheek cut.
Probably worth the set up for 28 tenons.
Sorry, but IMHO, not a router operation.
Lew
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"Pat Barber" wrote in message

You already know all this, but:
Fasted method for tenons on mission style slats that I've been _ever_ been able to come up with is to bury a TS dado blade in a sacrificial fence and use the fence to set the length of the tenon, and the blade height the same for all four sides.
I cut the 1/4" deep mortises with a hollow chisel mortiser, using whatever dimensions for mortise length results from the above ... on many "Mission" operations you just have to grin, bite the bullet and 'git r dun'.
Also on A&C/Mission furniture you will often see the slats buried in a mortise, 1/4" deep, cut to the exact dimension of the slat, foregoing the cuting of tenons in thin stock completely.
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I'm curious if you all glue in the spindles in your Mission style projects since they don't seem to have any structural benefit.
Cleaning up glue seepage between spindles is a PIA.
I'm seriously considering just making the spindle mortise and tenons tight but not glue them in. Is this a bad method??
Swingman wrote:

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IMO, gluing slats is not necessary in most cases.
I've made/designed a good deal in this style and rarely glue in slats unless, as in the case of a chair back, doing so would provide some needed/additional structural integrity.
YMMV ...
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Just put glue the mortise, not the tennon. Make the mortise a little deep. any extra glue will end up at the bottom of the mortise.
In all M&T glue-ups I always apply glue very sparingly to the tennon, but I am more generous on the mortise.
Squeezeout is next to nothing.
-Steve
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On 5 Dec 2006 08:46:10 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Not at all, IMO- I don't, for the very reason you mention, and it's never been a problem- even in the bench that sits outside year round and is exposed to the entire range of Wisconsin's weather (Hot and humid in the summer to dry and frigid in the winter)
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I have given this method serious thought
Swingman wrote:
Yep...this is my current method...

I did give this method very serious consideration.
If I could come up with a round over that matched the router bit, I think that would be the way to go with these slats.
I use a mortising machine but it will not produce a really crisp edge that I would care for. I much prefer the router for making my mortises.

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How about changing your thoughts to what we call a loose tenon? Your slats are 1/2" bullnosed, or 3/8, your choice, very long tenons, and the mortises are cut with a plunge router and jig for desired spacing. Stuff 'em in, and you can even go without glue if you care. You have top and bottom rails to maintain distance.
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If I thought I could match the "rounded end" left by the router bit, I would almost certainly use this method...
I use loose tenons for almost all my M&T stuff.
I prefer the router over all other methods.
George wrote:

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If I can with fifty-two on this latest project, you can, I'm sure.
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Pat Barber wrote:

A table saw a crosscut SLED, and stop blocks. Miter gages are evil.
I cut them slightly fat (~ 1/64 - 1/32) and perfect each fit with a shoulder plane at dry fit.
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Could you make round tenons? Are your slats rectangular or square in cross section? I was assuming square - in which case a round tenon or a loose dowel could be easier than cutting square tenons. If rectangular, you could use 2 dowels/round tenons. If you had or bought a dowel cutter (i.e. http://tinyurl.com/y9jmcp ), and used a drill press with a jig/fixture to hold the slats vertically, then drill the ends to make round tenons, they could fit into holes drilled in the rails. Or drilling a hole into the end of each slat, and one into the rail, would let you use dowels (functionally loose tenons). You'd want to glue these at least a tiny bit to keep the slats from spinning. Good luck, Andy
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Yep... I'll agree with that method also...
B A R R Y wrote:

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Make a router jig. I made a bed that had 42 slats for the head board and 42 for the food board, I also used the same jig for the siderails. I cut the mortises with an attachment for my drill press. The slats were not glued just a good fit.
Joe

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Can be routed and quite precisely. Follow pix link to tenonmaker.
http://patwarner.com/images/index_tenon.jpg
****************************************** Pat Barber wrote:

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The devil here is consistency. As the other Pat has mentioned, he has problems getting the tenons consistent in length with his dado. Router jigs do this just fine, which places a premium on getting the slats all the same length originally, so they will ultimately be the same _between the shoulders_ .
With the recent project I had a mess of non-structural slats which I hammered into routed pockets. I also had some places where they were structural. For those areas I mortised down another 1/2 x 7/8 x 1" at each pocket so I could glue and pin a conventional tenon.
To get the slats the same between shoulders, I made the tenons on one end first with the conventional miter gage/stop block against the fence setup after squaring the end. Depth of tenon my concern. I then set the shoulder to shoulder distance on a stop block on my miter gage jig, referenced it to the shoulder I had created, not the bottom of the tenon as I formed the shoulder at the other end. Didn't care how long the tenon was, as long as it was enough to be pegged. I then raised the blade and cut the long "loose tenons" to length using the same setup, referencing the squared end to the same stop I had used for the shoulder. Trimmed long tenons as required so as not to bottom in the mortises later.
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Is it acceptable to cut tenons across both ends of a wide board, and then rip the slats off of it?
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Well how about a full length dado instead of separate mortises. Set your slats in and figure out the gaps then cut small spacer blocks to fill in the gaps. That's what I did on a sleigh bed I made a few years ago with curved slats. It might work for what your doing. Jim
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A second option to what Jim suggested is to first make the full length dado. You then cut a piece to fit the dado snugly. Cut dados across is at the spacing required. I used this technique on a craftsman style bed with 35 slats on head and foot boards. Of course you don't have sholders on your slats with these methods Jim Northey wrote:

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