making raised panels


I bought a raised panel bit with a back cutter. What is the proper way to take each each cut. I watched Norm with a normal raised panel bit and he raises the bit after each pass but with the back cutter you cannot do this. Should I remove the back cutter and only replace for the last pass? Should I leave the bit height constant and move the fence after each pass?
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Should I remove the back cutter and only replace for the last pass? Should I leave the bit height constant and move the fence after each pass?
Yes.
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Let me try this again.
Should I leave the bit height constant and move the fence after each pass?
Yes.
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Because most raised panel bits have guide bearings use the fence at different distances until you reach the full depth cut. Taking the back cutter off is a pain and requires realignment of the bit.
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Move the fence. It is easier to do and you never ruin a panel by getting the wrong height setting once you have made the initial height adjustment and check. All of your panels turn out the same.
--
Charley


"mark" < snipped-for-privacy@islandtelecom.com> wrote in message
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I've never done it with a router, but my 3HP shaper easily makes a full cut with a 5" cutter and back cut. It seems like a 3HP router could take a full cut with the smaller cutters they take. I'd like to hear about this form someone who has tried. On super messy twisted grain hickory, I have to use the slow pulley setup to get enough torque, but it's still plenty fast and the cuts are still smooth...Freud panel raiser and Woodline backcutter. There is no noticeable dulling after a whole kitchen and three bathrooms. Wilson

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Leave the bit height and there's no need to move the fence. Clamp a shim ( about 1/2") against the fence. Make a pass. Replace the shim with a thinner (about 1/4") shim. Male another pass. For the last shim I use a piece of laminate like formica. Then I make a final finish pass without a shim.
I get excellent results and I don't have to alter the fence or cutter positions.
Joel
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great tip!
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On 25 Apr 2006 07:52:22 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

A good idea. I've used it on other items. However, my own setup has the router table as part of the table saw [no groans please], and it's dead simple for me to then adjust by moving the fence, rather than first making the shims then replacing them, clamping and reclamping. So, it depends on the setup.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

only lowering the RPMs but also avoiding burning as well as splintering and fuzz when doing the end grain. To eliminate burning you need to feed the stock fairly quickly. With a router, that often results in bogging the motor down if you try and cut the whole profile in one pass.
These bits take a bit of trial and error to arrive at the right combination of bit exposure in front of the fence and bit height above the table. Moving the fence, unless it can be accurately positioned for the final pass, will result in differences in a set of panels. Doesn't take much to notice, if only at an unconscious level.
Because of the size of the bit, if you make a zero clearance fence insert for its finaly pass set up, when you move the fence foreward to make progressive cuts you get a big gap around the bit in the initial passes. That gap can allow the leading corner to be pulled behind the fence face, not good. Same potential problem at the end of the pass.
Head over to alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking and look for "Big Bit Burning and Splintering Solution" which illustrates making zero clearance auxilliary fences and a tip to eliminate fuzzies and the need for sanding them off.
As for using a shaper to cut raised panels - best to have a power feeder - saves fingers and the need to change your shorts.
charlie b
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I find moving the fence much easier.
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Leon wrote:

I do it both ways.
I REALLY like 1/8" hardboard and raw plastic laminate shims for cutting depth / height adjustments, while I use clamped stop blocks to hold the final fence position.
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