Making new pine look old - what finish?


I'm to make a simple coat rack using 5 hooks mounted on a pine board. I may be able to come across an old, wide plank to use, but I'd also like to know of any techniques for making a new pine board look old. I'm ok with distressing it - what I'm looking for is a finish to give it that deep gold look, with a little black in the dents and scratches.
Thanks.
JP
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I just finished some knotty pine planking for an entertainment center where I had to match the existing finish. I don't know what products are available where you are, but I started out by sanding with 100 grit, NOT using an orbital sander. You don't have to sand much, just to rough up the surface a little. Then apply some Minwax sealer and surface conditioner. Follow the instructions and then put on a coat of Minwax Puritan Pine woodstain. This approximates the patina that would exist on a piece of old wood. Wait 12 hours and apply an orangey, yellow varnish stain like Benjamin Moore Early American. This is a very good varnish stain that will dry enough for sanding under normal conditions in 6 hours. The more coats of varnish stain you apply, the darker the wood will get. I found that 2 coats did it. The sealer is very important if you want an even finish. You can't tell the new wood from the old. If you'd like to see what happens if you forget to apply the sealer first, go to www.edswoods.com/appendix. The board on the left has no sealer and look at how splotchy it is. The picture was taken after the coat of Puritan Pine, before the Early American.
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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

Thanks for the technique. I tried your link, but it didn't work.
JP
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Hey Jay add the html www.edswoods.com/appendix.html thats what I did and it worked fine.
Al
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Al wrote:

Thanks - that worked.
The difference between those boards with and without the sealer is very noticeable. I'll be sure to remember to do that prior to staining.
JP

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Boiled linseed oil, thinned 1 part to 2 thinner. Followed by 1 to 1. The BLO was a traditional finish, and it ambers the wood nicely. Thinner helps it dilute resin for even coverage.
Follow with distressing, if desired, and use artist oil colors as a glaze to darken the places you want dark. Varnish of your flavor. Linseed-based continues what you started. Brush lightly over glazed areas.
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Here's what I read somewhere and did: Get a gallon of vinegar. Stuff pieces of fine steel wool inside. Let it sit until the steel wool dissolves. Then pour this stuff into a spray bottle. Spray it on the board and let it sit for a couple of days.
I'm a bit sketchy on the details... was about 3 years ago that I did this. Not sure how long to leave the steel wool sit in the vinegar or how long to leave the solution on the board before wiping it off and letting the board dry.
Used this with some new pine boards to match some old ones I salvaged. Gives them a nice weathered gray color.
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This is known to produce very dark wood in those species loaded with tannins. Pine is not in this category.
Gray, you say? You used the proper word - weathered. He's looking for something else. Now if you knock the soft stuff out with a wire brush prior to adding the solution, I imagine you can get neat weathered looks.
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The "black" can also be accomplished by burning the area with a propane torch, just enough to lightly scorch the softer areas, then wire brush to remove the burnt wood, leaving a blackened depression in the softer part of the pine. Practice to determine how much heat, wire brush and sanding to use.
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