making enclosures for electronics

anyone done this
how does the wood hold up over time
i am not expecting a lot of heat as it is a low power device but it will be warmer than ambient sometimes and then cooler at other times
i found a project that is using wood for a custom laptop but i am more interested in the longevity factor for wood in this application
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Electric Comet wrote:

Indoors, I would say it holds up pretty well, if you finish it and keep it dry. Maybe a few hundred years? But, it does not last forever...

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On Tuesday, June 21, 2016 at 12:15:37 AM UTC-4, Electric Comet wrote:

Does it not only have to last as long as the remaining life of the laptop? What are the chances that the next laptop has the identical dimensions?
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I have built some boxes for electronics. I always drilled lots of holes for air circulation. Put the holes so that the heat can escape upward and some cool air can come in below the heat. It should be OK. If it does warm up a bit, you can always install a fan. They have some very quiet fans for computer now.
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"Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net> wrote in

One thing to keep in mind about a fan is that it sucks power. If you're on a battery, having a fan could mean significantly reduced run time. It might be worth considering a switch (automatic or manual) and making sure your case is as open as possible.
Puckdropper
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On Mon, 20 Jun 2016 21:11:57 -0700, Electric Comet

Be aware that internal temperatures in laptops can get very high.
Look for CoreTemp, a free program that reads the temperature of the processor to see just how hot the specific device runs.
The dual core Intel processor in my laptop can hit 172F or more when working hard. This is in conditioned space that's 78F. Expect higher internal laptop temperatures if the ambient temperature is above 78F.
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ads writes:

That's generally measuring Tj (Junction temperature, the highest operating temperature of the actual semiconductor) or Tc (the temperature of the processor chip case itself).
The air temperature within the laptop is significantly less, assuming that the heatsinks, cooling devices and ventilation openings are functioning correctly.
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On Tue, 21 Jun 2016 20:35:33 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

All true, but I allow for the laptops that get set on upholstered furniture and carpet and inhale lots of the stuff that nakes "dust bunnies". I've cleaned large wads of that material out of a number of laptops. If the user isn't aware of keeping the vents clean and avoiding upholstered surfaces, the airflow drops drastically and the internal temperatures go up rapidly.
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On Tue, 21 Jun 2016 14:12:13 -0400 ads wrote:

this is a more efficient design and lower power so will not get that high
my concern is more to do with longevity
i am going to try and see how it does
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On Thursday, June 23, 2016 at 5:49:51 PM UTC-4, Electric Comet wrote:

I heard back from the gentleman that built these.
PC/AT
http://gfretwell.com/ftp/Woodiy%20AT.jpg
PS/2 M30
http://gfretwell.com/ftp/woody%20m30.jpg
PS/2 M30/286
http://gfretwell.com/ftp/woody%20m30-286.jpg
PS/2 M70
http://gfretwell.com/electrical/woody.jpg
He said that they were built between 1986 - 1991, adding "They lasted until they were too obsolete to use. I never had the RF interference problems everyone predicted but that is probably due to the way IBM made the boards."
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On Tue, 21 Jun 2016 14:12:13 -0400, ads wrote:

It depends on what that's measuring. If it's a thermal diode on the processor chip itself, 172F isn't all that hot (<80C). The processor should be able to take at least 105C (~220F) or perhaps 125C (~260F). Of course, the key is understanding exactly what is being measured. Without that information you have no information.
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4ax.com:

Exactly so. In most cases what's being measured (because it's what's we can really control) is the case temperature. But as you note, some devices have an internal sensor measuring the die (junction) temperature.
It would be unusual to find a case temp rating above 85C in a commercial grade product. That roughly corresponds to a junction temp of 105C. Automotive grade parts are usually spec'd for a case temp of 125C. There is a significant price premium for that temperature grade.
John
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On Tuesday, June 21, 2016 at 12:15:37 AM UTC-4, Electric Comet wrote:

These were built by a Master Electrician that I "know" through another usenet group. They are old and I can't speak to how they held up. (He hasn't answered that question yet. I'll let you know if/when he does.)
PC/AT
http://gfretwell.com/ftp/Woodiy%20AT.jpg
PS/2 M30
http://gfretwell.com/ftp/woody%20m30.jpg
PS/2 M30/286
http://gfretwell.com/ftp/woody%20m30-286.jpg
PS/2 M70
http://gfretwell.com/electrical/woody.jpg
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Unless you put the wood in direct contact with some part of the electronics that is very hot (i.e. try to use the wood as a heat sink) I would expect the wood to have a longevity factor several orders of magnitude longer than the electronics.
John
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On 6/21/2016 4:24 PM, John McCoy wrote:

I agree. I've seen many a Fender, with wood cabinet, guitar tube amp that ran plenty hot. I never saw the wood destroyed. Most of the old tube radios had wood boxes. Didn't seem to hurt them either.
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