Making dimples

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Is there a tool or attachment that I can use to make a series of dimples about 2" in diameter by a half inch deep? I envision something bowl-shaped, in whatever diameter I want, that could be chucked in a drill press to make a plunge cut to the desired depth. I don't have a plunge router, so that's not an option.
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Richard:

In what? Wood, metal? Perhaps a brass rod, or even a PVC pipe, depending.
MJM
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On Jul 29, 1:57 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

In second reading, I realized what you're trying to accomplish. Swingman offered a core box bit, I think that probably would do it, but very slowly? on the drill press.
I was off in space on my first response, I was thinking of something I just saw at a museum. The outside is covered in copper plates, that have dimples, like you described.
MJM
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

In wood.
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"Richard Evans" wrote in message

IIRC, Amana had elongated core box bits up 2 1/4" in diameter, but I don't know if they would work at drill press speeds (although I certainly wouldn't want to chuck one of those puppies into a _hand held_ router at any speed).
If the material is not prone to splintering and you can keep the bit sharp, something like that just might work, along with some patience, at drill press speeds.
DAGS "elongated core box bits" for starters.
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A rosette cutter should do the job. You'll probably have to grind your own profile knife though. Art

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wrote:

Ball peen hammer.. good stress relief, as a side effect..
Lacking that, I could see something resembling a steel ball of the proper diameter, maybe with a handle attached.. Place it on a center-punched mark and wail away with a 3 pound hammer..
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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Not practical. I'm thinking about building a pipe rack for oversized briar pipes. Racks for normal size pipes typically have a shelf with a dimple in which to rest the bowl, and above that a notched strip to hold the stem so the pipe sits vertically. Said shelves can be as long as needed to hold however many pipes you have. All my pipes are hand carved and extra large, so don't fit in normal racks.
Someone earlier mentioned a fluting bit for a router, using it in a drill press, but the size I need is over $90, so that's out.
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Richard Evans wrote:

Hmm - you might take a look at:
http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/smarthtml/pages/bt_core.html
(mind the wrap)
Is this a one-off, or are you planning to make a bunch of these?
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Yes, that's it. The 2" model at $29 is a lot cheaper than the one I saw for over $90 on another site.

Just for my personal use, though I have a couple of dozen large pipes and may make a couple of racks, or maybe a multi-tiered single one.
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Richard Evans wrote:

If you were going to produce a substantial number, I'd have suggested tracking down a shop nearby with a CNC router to cut ovoid bowls.
As long as I have you on the line, are you aware of any current sources for the bits used to bore out the bowls?
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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I don't make the pipes, but I subscribe to alt.smokers.pipes and there are guys there who could answer that.
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Richard Evans wrote:

Thanks. I'll give 'em a try.
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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>http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/smarthtml/pages/bt_core.html
You might find that bit a little unweildy for handheld use. I have a 2" one I use for cutting grooves but I use it in a router table. If I had to cut dimples with it I'd probably chuck it in the router table and use my lift to bring it up and then down. Although I suppose it might be safe if you don't cut too deep or too quickly.
I've had occasion to cut circles like this once for a customer. It was part of a decorative accent for some built ins and a mantle. I made a simple jig out of a wooden bowl. All you do is cut a hole in the bottom with a forstner bit and then put your router in it. Use a collar to follow the inside diameter of the hole. The slope of the bowl translates into a bowl shaped dimple. I used a smaller core box bit to reduce ridges. The depressions in my pieces were more like 3" because the house and the pieces were really large. Another guy working on site told me the home was worth 7.5 million, to give you a better idea of the room size.
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Richard Evans wrote:

I'd use a scorp:
http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?FamilyId 25
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Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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Richard Evans wrote:

Another option might be to cut a cove with your table saw so instead of each pipe having it's own "dimple" they would share a common cove. The notched strip for the stem would maintain separation. This would be free if you have a table saw...
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Table saw and radial saw. Yes, I'm considering that. It's easier on the radial saw: Set the blade in the rip position, then pivot it a few degrees to obtain the desired width. Set height to obtain desired depth, run the piece through as if you were ripping it.
Depending on depth, it may take a cuple of passes with the blade set successively llower.
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wrote:
<snip>

would it make them more of a conventional shape if you attached a piece if 1/2" or so shim stock along one side, then cut the dimples as if crosscutting or doing a dado? Seems like that might make the "bowl holder" part of the base mostly in the front or back of the pipe rack, depending on which side you had raised..
Just a wild-ass thought, but ya never know..
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mac
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I've been thinking of that too, but now it's August in North Carolina, daytime highs around 100 with about 90% humidity and my shop is in a detached garage with no A/C, nor even cross ventilation. I don't expect to do much but plan until September when the heat breaks.
Funny place, central NC. August is unbearable, then comes Labor Day and it's like somebody flipped a switch: temps and humidity drop overnight and we settle into fall, until sometime after Christmas.
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Wed, Jul 30, 2008, 2:54pm snipped-for-privacy@mindspring.com (Richard Evans) did thusly proclaim: Not practical. I'm thinking about building a pipe rack for oversized briar pipes. Racks for normal size pipes typically have a shelf with a dimple in which to rest the bowl, and above that a notched strip to hold the stem so the pipe sits vertically. Said shelves can be as long as needed to hold however many pipes you have. All my pipes are hand carved and extra large, so don't fit in normal racks. Someone earlier mentioned a fluting bit for a router, using it in a drill press, but the size I need is over $90, so that's out.
Oh damn, stopped by to see if silly season was over yet. Not yet.
No brainer. Cut a half circle out of metal, slot a piece of small metal pipe or round stock, slot the half round pice in the slot, solder or weld. Viola, cost zip, and you've got a custom dimpling thingy. Either that or use a big ass hammer to make your dimples. Or do like a lot of commerical pipe racks, drill holes of the required size in a piece of wood, lay that on top of another picee, and there's your custom dimples. Use your imagination. Better yet, quit smoking, sell your pipes, buy lumber.
I'm going back to my shop, where I figure out my own answers.
JOAT If you don't ask the right questions, the answers don't matter. - W.S. Lind
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