Making Cabinet Doors with Rail and Stile router bit

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On 12/13/2012 12:31 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

ASCII and ye shall receive ... scooted my office chair around the corner in the last five minutes and took these with my trusty iPhone, which does NOT do them justice:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopJustStuff#5821511161198582786
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopJustStuff#5821511243965788130
I really need to get a good camera, but the damned phone is just too convenient.
(I know, I know ... violated one of your pet peeves by not holding the phone horizontal, but live with it) ;)
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On 12/13/12 1:23 PM, Swingman wrote:

https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopJustStuff#5821511161198582786
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopJustStuff#5821511243965788130
Yes, that appears to be the stuff I'm talking about. It looks like joined boards... and it matches much better than just about every mass produced raised panel I've ever seen. Take luck out of the equation, and none of them would match.

Tell me about it. The camera on my phone is better quality than any stand-alone camera we've ever bought.

No, no, grandpa. That's for video. Take your stills however you want-- whatever best frames the subject. Most people don't realize that their phones shoot video in 16:9 aspect ratio, HD. Then they get pissed at their phones for taking such a "skinny video." :-)
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-MIKE-

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On 12/13/2012 1:33 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

LMFAO ... but you're right, I am that.
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On 12/13/12 2:47 PM, Mike Marlow wrote:

Yes, we have.
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-MIKE-

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On 12/13/2012 12:27 PM, Swingman wrote:

...
EWoodShopACCornerCabinet2007#5656820178785694354
I've commented before on the sideboard, Karl...I've got plans for something very similar to replace the panels on the one builtin in the dining room here at some point...at that point we'll remove the '80s wainscot paneling and carpet and strip the wide woodwork back and go back to the 1" T&G pine flooring as well...
--


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On 12/13/2012 1:11 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

Lame might have been a tad strong, but I said it, and I think it. I'm not a fan of anything Shaker, or Mission for that matter. It all looks like grade school shop class to me.

I rarely see flat panels that I like in doors. Have you seen book matched solid wood raised panel doors? There a million styles, all better than flat ply panel.

I like them, but as you said, it's a matter of taste. I just built a four door four drawer shop cabinet this week that has plywood panel doors, shaker stile... Yuck! Flat plywood panels are quick and dirty imo. I thought a while before going with the plywood, and did it mainly because I had the material on hand, but still had to keep telling myself it's just for a shop.
I've noticed on TV white painted wood is back in style, I still like wood, but admit 40 years ago I liked dark wood, and today like lighter stuff. I doubt I'll ever like plywood flat panels in doors other than laundry or shop, nor shaker stuff, nor mission stuff. Taste differs for sure.

Structurally, plywood panels are the way to go, period. Solid wood raised panels are for looks only. If you prefer the looks of flat plywood panels, you are in luck, they are super simple to make, cheaper and structurally superior to solid wood panels.
--
Jack
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...snip...
I wasn't saying that I wasn't going to use his suggested process because my doors are different sizes, I was saying that I can't make "only a couple or three different sizes" because I have at least 11 very different sizes of openings. The uppers on the left of the sink are all one size - 3 doors, all left hinged with a space between each door. On the right of the sink, there are 2 right hinged doors that are a different width than the 3 on the left.
At a right angle to them is a pair of center opening doors that are a different width again. Then there's the short door above the tall door making up a floor floor to ceiling unit. Then there's a different sized (height and width) single tall door.
Same situation with the base cabinets - 9 doors, 5 different widths, 2 different heights.

That's a fine idea, but just not practical in my case. It's not really custom fitting each door individually, it's just the way the stick built cabinets are laid out. The openings aren't just a "bit off" they're totally different sizes based on the design.
There are a couple of sets of 2 and 3 that match, but there are a number a single sizes also. That's just how it is.

Thanks for the link.

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On 12/13/2012 11:21 AM, Jack wrote:

...
Indeed...just a few comments/amplification on my style/preferences...
I rarely _do_ use either assuming I have wide-enough stock that I have sufficient length against the fence to have a stable bearing surface throughout the operation. By doing it that way having squared the ends first one isn't:
a) fighting two separate reference planes (the fence and a sled/gauge for dominance in alignment, and
b) taking the time to ensure that if a) the two are square to each other and the material is correctly positioned, etc., ...
It's all in promoting efficiency by dispensing w/ what isn't needed and simplifying the operations to the minimum.
I _may_ use a small block if the stock material is particularly prone to severe splitting, but in general it isn't really needed as the next operation will clean up the edge automagically anyway. And, it's only an issue on the first pass anyway as once the end is coped they're all done. So, unless your stock is just precisely wide enough that you lose a whole piece, you can just make a cleanup pass over the jointer anyway if desired/needed...that's quicker than clamping a piece to the stock or having to handle the two pieces together (or at least it's the way I've become accustomed to working... :) )
W/ a piece as wide as the 8" stock I mentioned previously, I am perfectly comfortable using it freehand against the fence in either direction--coping the ends or sticking the edges. Then again, I've been running a shaper for 40-some years now, and there _is_ a certain learning of technique w/ time... :)
The first freehand shaping against a pattern was, at that time, a pucker-factor experience, indeed, but now it is routine so familiarity does help and having had some instruction from both formal classroom shop as well as some of the older guys w/ the industrial experience along the way certainly didn't hurt.
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On Wednesday, December 12, 2012 12:44:45 PM UTC-8, DerbyDad03 wrote:

You need to learn about a "Coping Sled" to cut the rail ends. You can build them or buy them. I built one from a plan in a magazine a few years back and it is my pride and joy. Thing is bullet proof and a real workhorse. If I can locate the plans I'll post a link.
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"DerbyDad03" wrote:

------------------------------------------------------- That's a basic 25,000 RPM machine.
Max diameter bit at that RPM is about 1" dia.
Bit manufacturers include the MAX RPM with every bit they sell.
If you plan on doing raised panel doors which use about a 3" Dia bit.
Operating that bit at 25,000 RPM is a disaster waiting to happen.
You will need a 3+HP machine operating at 7-8,000 RPM.
No raised panel doors, PC690 should handle it.
Make flat panel doors and you can do everything on a T/S, no router needed.
Have fun.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

I have a related question. I have a Dewalt 2 1/4 HP router (Model 618) which will do 8000 RPM (and faster, of course).
Can I use it in a table with a 3" diameter bit to cut a "raised panel" in Cherry wood? I only need to make 2-4 panels, so I hope this is workable. I assume my "luck" will be better if I only cut 1/8" or less at a time. Is that about right?
Bill
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"Bill" wrote:

---------------------------------------------------------- What is the MAX RPM spec'd by the bit mfg?
Shallow passes are the only way to go with a large bit.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Here in an example of what I was looking at:
http://www.precisionbits.com/yonico-12335-3-bit-raised-panel-cabinet-door-router-bit-set-ogee.html
On the safety and tips tab at the bottom, this note in general max speeds of 8k-12K RMP for bits that are 2 1/2 -3 1/2 inches in diameter.
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"Bill" wrote:

http://www.precisionbits.com/yonico-12335-3-bit-raised-panel-cabinet-door-router-bit-set-ogee.html
---------------------------------------------------------------------- Looks like Harbor Freight bits would be a couple of steps up in quality compared to these bits.
Looks like they have addressed the MAX RPM issue.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Harbor Freight has one of "Warrier" brand. I'm not sure there is a couple of steps of quality between them. %-)

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I have this set from Infinity (Chamfer 91-504) http://www.infinitytools.com/Rail-Stile-Router-Bits-For-Cabinet-Doors/products/1040 / I don't think I even chucked them up.
I would sell them for $70 shipped.
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-MIKE-

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On 12/13/12 5:48 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

http://www.infinitytools.com/Rail-Stile-Router-Bits-For-Cabinet-Doors/products/1040 /
Do you happen to have the set-up block also?
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On 12/13/12 10:09 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Yes, included.
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-MIKE-

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I'll need to talk to SWMBO to see if the chamfer profile is OK with her. If so, I'll be in touch.
Thanks!
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