Making and installing flooring

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On Fri, 02 Sep 2016 23:05:55 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

What do you mean by "aged dry"? I have a quite a bit of ash that I've had for over 30 years. It cuts like butter. Well, frozen butter. ;-) I have 10 or 12 maple 2x10s that I got at the same time but I haven't done anything with them for a long time.
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These were10 foot sheet metal palets that had been sitting in the hot sun for 3 or 4 months before I got them. They would have been kiln dried (baked) to jany ctitters before being made into pallets. They cut fine with a carbide blade - but don't take kindlyto being punctured by a nail. This is mixed hardwood. I suspect mostly birch, ash beech, and hard maple but I don't know for sure.
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On 9/3/2016 8:34 AM, krw wrote:

Some woods simply get harder as they age. About 20 years ago I refinished and re-glued the pieces in the top that the glue has failed on. Running those boards through the saw to clean off the old glue and then through the jointer resulted in dull knives almost immediately and only in that 3/4" location on the blades. This piece was supposedly about 60 years old at the time.
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"Leon" wrote in message

My first experience with that phenomena was with Douglas Fir floor joists... cutting, drilling, nailing them was a real chore 20 years in compared to when they were new.
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On 9/3/2016 3:56 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:

One has to wonder if the finish that soaks in might have something to do with that. Although I have cut up some old oak limbs with a chain saw and the blade dulled quite quickly, 6~7 4" cuts.
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No finish on the pallets 0r the gramaries.
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On Sat, 3 Sep 2016 16:56:22 -0400, "John Grossbohlin"

When the douglas fir granaries were but into the barn all the wood was cut with a hand saw.IT WOULD TAKE A REAL MAN WITH A GOOD HANDSAW TO CUT IT UP TODAY!!!
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I wonder if the wood wasn't better/harder than what we get now.
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"old growth" timber was definitely more dense - and therefore harder and stronger than "new" wood - buit the pallets were not likely old growth wood.
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wrote in message

With pallet wood you sometimes run into "heat treated" wood, a process that goes beyond "kiln dried" as a means of killing insects, mold, fungus, etc. I tried working with some heat treated pine that could be had cheaply and it was just awful... hard and brittle would be a good way to describe it. The heat treated wood was rough cut on one side and thickness planed on the other... I think it was intended for crating purposes.
http://internationalshippingusa.com/ISPM_15_Rules.aspx https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISPM_15
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On Sun, 4 Sep 2016 00:01:45 -0400, "John Grossbohlin"

Like I said. "baked"
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I wonder if the [foreign-made] boxed nails we get aren't softer. Back in the late 70s and 80s I had to pre-drill old-growth pine trim before hand-nailing 4p and 6p finish nails.
Dave in SoTex
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On 09/03/2016 8:34 AM, krw wrote: ...

White ash group (includes white, green and some other less common species) have a tendency to form silicate deposits depending upon local soil conditions.
There are a number of green ash for ornamentals in the yard here that unfortunately the emerald borers have managed to find...several have been killed. Sawing dead from them that has been standing for years is a real treat...sparks simply fly from a saw chain and it dulls a chain in a heartbeat; about as bad as just digging the bar into the ground...

Maple varies tremendously in species as well; soft maple is quite easy to work although occasionally will leave a little fuzz after shaping while sugar maple/birds eye while gorgeous is a real workout...
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This is pretty straight-grained sugar maple, complete with the tap holes. The boards are just under 8' and *heavy*. The ash is a feather, in comparison.
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"Leon" wrote in message
<Something to think about, my experience with dead dried wood is that it

This stuff isn't bad... dead less than a year. I cut half a 10.5' long 30" DBH log into 4/4 boards without having to resharpen the chain. Taking the bark off helps a lot... bark is full of grit.
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