Making and installing flooring

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Any of you guys ever make and lay flooring? I've got access to a lot of ash (victims of the Emerald Ash Borer) and can make cants or boards in the woods with my Alaskan Chainsaw Mill... (Recall the MS 461 I got from Craig's List back in January). Thus the cost of the raw materials is my time and chainsaw consumables. The rest is shop work... I'm thinking about doing a random width floor for my house... say nominal 4, 5 and 6 inch boards. I'm wondering, however, about nailing it down... will edge nailing 6" floor boards like the typical strip floor suffice or does it demand face nailing?
BTW, I've been milling boards up to 29" wide with the MS 461 using a Granberg mill and a 36" bar... Works pretty well and a 29" x 10.5' board is pretty impressive... two of them covers more square footage than a sheet of plywood! ;~)
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On Wed, 31 Aug 2016 17:33:42 -0400, "John Grossbohlin"

flooring.
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wrote in message wrote:

Yes, T&G... make my shaper earns it's keep!
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wrote:

Don't forget that neither the bottom edges nor the tongue edge touch the adjacent board; i.e, the tongue is less wide than the groove is deep and there is a bevel below the tongue (and/or on the adjacent plank).
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"dadiOH" wrote in message

The T&G shaper cutters take care of those aspects of the job... I have no intention of winging it!
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"dadiOH" wrote in message wrote in message

Here is an example of the flooring cutters for shapers...
http://www.grizzly.com/products/Flooring-Cutter-Set-Tongue-Groove-3-4-Bore/C2307?utm_campaign=zPage
They create an off set tongue, back beveled edge, etc. These combined with a stock feeder would make the milling pretty straight forward though likely it would get boring!
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On 9/1/2016 12:26 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:

If I was doing more than a little bit of flooring I'd definitely want to have a power feeder on all of the tools. In commercial applications virtually everything is automatic and uses custom tooling. In a home shop there would be the job of ripping, jointing, and planing to thickness before you even get around to the actual making of flooring. Amana makes a nice cutter set for the T&G but that is just a small bit of the work involved.
In a factory it is basically a single pass through a machine which does it all, takes in sawn rough wood in one end and spits out T&G at the other end. I still don't know how one would go about doing the grooving on the bottom surface that seems to be a standard fixture on commercial flooring in a home shop. Many passes through a router table? Stacked round-nose cutters on the shaper and feed on edge?
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On Thursday, September 1, 2016 at 2:36:45 PM UTC-4, John McGaw wrote:

I have seen where the relief cut on the underside has been a simple saw kerf (or more depending on width of the board) maybe 1/8" --> 3/16" deep, rather than plowing out a wide groove...
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On Thursday, September 1, 2016 at 1:49:05 PM UTC-5, bnw...
I still don't know how one would go about doing the grooving on the

ther than plowing out a wide groove...
I've never cut relief cuts and don't know if this is safe.... a few thought s off the top of my head.
Load 2-3 blades (7 1/4" blades?), spaced apart, on the table saw. ....OR u se dado blades, spaced apart. Not sure if they could be secured properly.
Also, I suppose there might be a fluting type bit, but profiled for those r elief cuts, so that more than one "kerf" can be cut, at a time. I have an fluting bit that cuts three 1/2" flutes, at a time.
Also, I suppose one can grind/profile a set of jointer blades... make the a ppropriate knotches.... and run the boards through the jointer.... slower t han normal feed? For 1/8";3/16" deep cuts, 2 passes 1/16;3/32" at a time? I suppose this is the concept with dedicated moulder machines, as with ma king mouldings. But wonder if jointer blades are too brittle for this sor t of milling, that the "teeth" would chip off.
Sonny
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wrote in message wrote:

I can run them through my molder set up with backing knives... One pass.
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"John McGaw" wrote in message

A power feeder is part of the plan... I can use it on the table saw, band saw, jointer and shaper... The molder/planer will be used for thicknessing and the backing relief and that has it's own feed.
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On Wed, 31 Aug 2016 17:33:42 -0400

not sure but i think flooring is usually kiln dried
but maybe it depends on the species

looks better too i bet
sounds like you almost have your wood supply set up from end to end
i am guessing that you probably plant trees to
am i right
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"Electric Comet" wrote in message wrote:

I'm sure in a factory environment it would be... I'm using standing dead ash that is pretty dry already and I have the materials to create a solar kiln. I figure that by the time I get all the wood cut that the earliest cut stuff will be ready for machining.

Pretty much... though being part of a large woodworking club has given me access to wood as needed over the years. Now I'm simply going to another level. It makes it possible to grab the odd urban tree that is offered up that I passed on in the past. It's kind of sad to think of the cherry and walnut trees I let get cut up into firewood in the past... Taking Game of Logging chainsaw training opened my eyes to a lot of possibilities. Also, seeing a video on mounting a winch on an Alaskan mill made the viability of milling inaccessible large trees realistic... Pushing a chainsaw mill through a large log is brutal work but I can twirl the winch handle with one finger due to the gear reduction and get a better result (smoother and more consistent cut).

Not exactly, but I have watched the subject trees grow since they were not much more than saplings so it's sort of true... ;~) I suppose that there are a few trees I planted 40+ years ago that could someday end up coming down under my saw. A maple about 32" DBH and a polar about 14" DBH come to mind as they have outgrown their places.
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Look up Matt Cremona on YouTube. He mills his own lumber too. A short time back he milled up his own flooring and installed it in a room of his house. Huge project, very impressive.
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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"HerHusband" wrote in message

I'd seen Matt's videos... found them while exploring the possibility of doing it.
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Back in the day, a gloat like that on the wreck would have been followed by a chorus of "you suck!".
Have you succeeded in drying any of those wide boards? I'd expect them to split longwise as they dry.
John
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"John McCoy" wrote in message

The boards were milled from standing dead ash trees and were pretty well dried already... That said, I did expect the ones with pith to split... but I'm sawing them down the pith while stickering so I have control over the split. I'd never use those boards whole anyway... don't look good to me.
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On 9/2/2016 5:05 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:

tends to be extra hard and tough on the tooling.
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bad!!! I built my shed with hardwood 2X from sheet metal pallets - had to drill for virtually every nail!!
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