Making a moulding plane

I've got to make some replacement window frames for my house and I'd like to make them in the style of the originals (1930's). Picture at:
http://www.esperance-linux.co.uk/misc/win1.jpg
They've got a moulding on them which is somewhat akin to an extended Roman ogee. I can get a similar " router bit but aswell as the cost of the bit, I'd have to get a " router which rules out that idea.
I thought of doing a number of passes with my " router and a variety of bits but that would be a pain even if I could figure out what bits etc. to use.
Since I'm using Scandinavian pine for the frames, my next idea was to make a moulding plane with the desired profile. Anybody tackled making a moulding plane to do such a job? Any web resources/books about how to tackle it or any other hints? I'd be happy to spend some dough on a book as it would be useful if I came up against any other one-off profiles in the future.
TIA
--

Frank


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<snip>

Here's how I do it:
http://home.insightbb.com/~sepost/Thumbnail_Making/start.html
As far as books go, "Making Traditional Wooden Planes" by John Whelan is the best on making molding planes. There's also a video out by Tod Herrli on making a side escapement plane (hollows & rounds) that you can get here:
http://members.bellatlantic.net/~vze2nwp6/planes/hollow.html
Another way to learn is to take a class. Tod Herrli offers classes at his house in Indiana. Larry Williams of Clark & Williams (http://www.planemaker.com ) occasionally teaches classes too. He taught one at Arrowmont in Tennessee in '02.
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Scott Post snipped-for-privacy@insightbb.com http://home.insightbb.com/~sepost /

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Scott, you Bast*rd! I had stuff to do this morning so I didn't have time to spend an hour reading your web site. You owe me!!!
Actually, very nice tutorial on making a plane. It made me want to go make one. Maybe between Christmas & New Years when I'm off work. Hmm, I might have to order some supplies this afternoon.
--
Larry C in Auburn, WA

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On Thu, 04 Dec 2003 10:48:09 GMT, Scott Post wrote:

Thanks Scott. I just checked out Amazon for the book but I fear it might be out of print. I might get hold of the video though.
I also checked out your site and your write-up is brilliant and it gives me the confidence to give it a go. I first have to get another job out of the way, so I probably wont start building it until after Xmas but I'll put some pictures up once I'm done.
A couple of questions: what timber do you use? I guess any reasonably durable close-grained hardwood would do the job but perhaps the plane-makers of yore had a preference. You finished with boiled linseed, do you think Danish oil is OK?
I've found a supplier of tool steel just a few miles down the road (http://www.westyorkssteel.com /) and thought I might go for A2 for the iron. Their site is quite interesting and includes colour charts for tempering etc.

Too far to go, unless you fancy sending me a transatlantic plane ticket (gratis) ;)
--

Frank


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Yes - any close grained hardwood is fine. Beech and birch are both traditional. Hard maple works fine too. I've seen a few from apple and cherry. Some of the woods from the rosewood family like cocobolo are really nice.

I don't see why not. It's just oil with a bit of varnish.

I missed the ".uk" the first time around.
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