Making a complicated (for me) curve

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Hi all, I am building a long wooden shuffleboard table and would like to copy the design in this link.
http://www.shuffleboard.net/9-dominator-shuffleboard-table.html
The part I am unsure about is how to make the curved "horse collar" ends on the table top. If you click on the photos you eventually will see a close up and can see that it is capped with a rounded bit of trim, which is no problem, but the part I'm not sure how to make is the side piece which is also curved. Any ideas on how best to make this feature?
Thanks!
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Any ideas on how best to make

I think you mean the corner pieces. Two methods I can think of.
1. Laminate thin pieces over a mold. Too hard, I wouldn't do it.
2. Build up a block thick enough to cut out on the bandsaw. It doesn't need to be a square of the whole corner. Picture looking down frm the top. You need a piece thick enough to cross the corner at 45 degrees. You can laminate a few pieces and only one piece needs to be thick enough to cover the whoile outside face (if that makes sense. Draw it out on end and cut it on the bandsaw. Clean up the shape with sanders. If you don't have a band saw you can slice of segments (chords) using a TS or other tool. Then smooth with planes, sanders, draw knives, etc.
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Thanks! That seems like a good approach.
What about the side pieces? How would one get the "bowed" shape along the whole length of the board?
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Kevin wrote:

Looks more like a curved taper than a bow. You could tack or tape a thin strip behind the bottom edge and make a straight taper using a power planer, then round off with hand plane. Cut a template of the curve to check progress.
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Gerald Ross

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I would probably use the table saw to slice off segments. Make a fixture so I can precisely move it in 5 degree increments or something. Then smooth it with planes and sanders. Or if you are adventerous you could do the whole thing with a hand plane(s).
One trick when doing this is either way is to draw the finished shape you on the end of piece. You would be surprised how well you can approximate that shape by cutting to it with succesive passes.
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On 1/26/12 1:58 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

From the looks of the grain in the pics, that's what they did.
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On 1/26/2012 11:38 AM, Kevin wrote:

The second picture says "Corners milled out of s single piece of wood. A feature found only on a Hudson shuffleboard". It is also apparent in that picture that the curved corners are separate pieces of wood from the remainder of the horse collar. To me, this implies that the corner curve is cut to shape using a band saw from a block of wood.
Note: You get a better view of the images by clicking of the images on the first page and then clicking on the image again on the window that opens from the first.
From that picture and the next, I think that the rounded top edge is part of the side and corner pieces rather than a separate piece of trim.
Dan
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That's a spectacular shuffleboard. A REALl project. I wish you luck on it. Please keep us updated. Can't wait to see how yours comes out!

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Kevin wrote:

As others have said, band saw. You could also do it with a router, jig needed. You could also do it by hand...
1. plane or grind to rough shape
2. clean up/fine shape with rasp
3. sand
Not hard, done it numerous times. Mostly for hand rails for a sailboat.
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dadiOH
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On 1/27/2012 6:52 AM, dadiOH wrote:

I think the problem he's having is how to do the enormous _round over_ (for want of a better word) on the the outside face of the _sides_ and curved corners of the "horse collar".
To do this repeatedly and accurately around six sides and, even harder, around the eight curved corners, and without a jig and/or some special machinery, appears to be a daunting task that takes a lot more thought doing it in a small shop than just the ninety degree corners.
AFAICT, no one has addressed this yet. Nifty problem for a problem solver using small shop hand and power tools.
I've got some hazy notions at this point, but they are so unsettled it hurts my mind to think about them. :)
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On 1/27/2012 8:13 AM, Swingman wrote:

Sorry, _four_ curved corners ... told you it hurt my mind to think about it.
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Yes, exactly. That is the part I cannot figure out!
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Kevin wrote:

Same answer. It really isn't hard to do it by hand; it is unlikely you'll get the curve identical piece to piece - or even on the same piece - but it isn't hard to get it so it LOOKS the same. If you are really fussy, one could get it close then make a template from a piece of sheet metal and scrape away.
:)))))))))))))
As others have said, band saw. You could also do it with a router, jig needed. You could also do it by hand...
1. plane or grind to rough shape
2. clean up/fine shape with rasp
3. sand
Not hard, done it numerous times. Mostly for hand rails for a sailboat.
--

dadiOH
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On 1/27/2012 2:46 PM, dadiOH wrote:

There's your answer right there, Kevin. Hire dadiOH to put his skills where his mouth is.
:)
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Swingman wrote:

handy-dandy Ridgid 13 inch planer. I did it in 3 steps, but got a barely perceptible curve. I think the first pass should have taken off more and the last two should have been raised more, especially the last pass.
I used a 24 inch board and cut three strips of door skin and glued them to the back of the board using 3 dabs of hot melt glue. Clamped for a couple of minutes and ran it through the planer with the attached strip on bottom. Repeated, adding another strip each time.
The theory works, but it needs more adjustment of the heights and amounts removed. If all four boards were done the same way, in sequence, It would look pretty good.
See pictures in ABPW.
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On 1/27/2012 1:48 PM, Gerald Ross wrote:

That's cool, and along the lines of what I was thinking, except doing the bevel on table saw and using a plane, or pattern maker's rasp, to round off the crown.
All fine and good, but only half the job ... now, how are going to do the same thing, and match it precisely, on the curved, 90 degree corner turnarounds?
_That's_ the part I'm still scratching my head on. :)
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Swingman wrote:

By hand, man, by hand. Join the corner blocks to the shaped ends and sides and go at it.
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On 1/27/2012 2:48 PM, dadiOH wrote:

Easy to type ... and a helluva lot more difficult to get acceptable results from a "by hand" task of that precision, let alone a result that _looks_ like as precise as the pictures the OP is wanting to duplicate ... which even you admitted yourself.
A master craftsman, with tools, plenty of experience, and ample time to do it by hand? yeah ... but someone asking the question in a newsgroup?
Not any time soon ...
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Swingman wrote:

Depends on how much he likes Shuffleboard! ; )
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On 1/27/2012 6:06 PM, Bill wrote:

I'd love to see how David J Marks, or Tom Plaman when he was still in the business, would approach the round over on the curved corner.
The inside radius of the corner pieces is a piece o cake; the outside radius brings it to another level, obviously not impossible, but certainly challenging in a small shop environment to get it done with a consistent precision to match the factory version.
Personally, and if I were going to do it, I wouldn't want to settle for anything less than that precision ... hell, you can hack it out with a chainsaw if you don't give a shit.
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