Making a buck saw

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On Wed, 03 Aug 2005 08:08:05 -0700, fredfighter wrote:

I asked the mavens on rec.crafts.metalworking about that technique. Don't try it on high speed steel, they point out.
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On Thu, 04 Aug 2005 01:09:36 -0500, the opaque Australopithecus scobis

I used a hand punch press to pop holes in bandsaw blade stock for my infamous bow saur. Vive la Roper Whitney!
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Got pichers a that thin'yet?
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On Thu, 04 Aug 2005 10:50:13 -0700, the opaque Fly-by-Night CC

Huh? Why would I take pictures of a hand punch, Owie? ;)
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Your sidestep indicates the answer is "no." ;)
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On Thu, 04 Aug 2005 23:03:42 -0700, the opaque Fly-by-Night CC

That bow saur is my Unfinished Symphony, dude. Gimme a break.
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Totally. If you ever finished it we'd all be poorer. It's much more fun with it being a vapor tool. %-)
Dave in Fairfax
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On Fri, 05 Aug 2005 20:14:26 GMT, the opaque Dave in Fairfax

It's not a vapor tool, it's simply a work in progress, Dave.
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Then here's to the journey. And I meant it about the poorer.
Dave in Fairfax
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On Sat, 06 Aug 2005 01:38:55 GMT, the opaque Dave in Fairfax

Thanks. I'll try to avoid finishing it this decade. (Either?)
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Mr. Jaques' Opus?
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On Sat, 06 Aug 2005 00:50:52 -0700, the opaque Fly-by-Night CC

Ah ain't no penguin.
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clearly wrote:

Speaking of works in progress, is Dina finally finished, or is it still a "work in progress"?(R,D&G)
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Check the articles section of the hand tools board at Woodcentral.com. There are some excellent pointers on various user-crafted saws posted.
And let us know how it turns out. This is one of those 'some day' projects for me.
Patriarch
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Prometheus (in snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com) said:
| My general idea is to make a basic H-frame with the blade on one | side, and a threaded rod on the other (to adjust the tension with a | wrench- I know there are some methods that use a cable, but I
You might consider screen door hardware: a center turnbuckle with (IIRC) 1/8" or 3/16" rods threaded about 1-/1/2" on one end and an eye on the other for tensioning the blade.
| figured the rod would be a little bit more solid) So as far as I | can see, I have only two or three things to consider here- first is | the joinery for that middle crossbar; my inclination is to use a | loose mortise and tenon joint with a wooden dowel to keep it from | falling apart when changing the blade. I figure a little bit of | slack will allow the joint to move when the blade is tensioned (no | glue in the joint, obviously) The second consideration is a matter
The loose M&T approach is a good one. I don't think the dowels are needed - and suspect that the saw might be stronger without drilling for the dowel. The saw should be easy to assemble on a flat surface and, once assembled and tensioned, doesn't need dowels to stay together. I think you'll do better by supporting the crosspiece on the shoulders of the tenon than on a dowel or pin through the tenon.
| of basic design- what I've used in the past is the standard metal | bow saw, but I've seen that the older saws have a frame that | extends below the blade on one side. Generally, I'm using the saw | on logs that are laying on or near the ground, so I'm afraid it | could get in the way, but if there is a compelling reason to keep | that extended frame, I'm sure I can work with it (my guess is it | helps to keep the blade plumb, but I couldn't say for sure) The | third is whether it's useful to leave a set of handles on the top | of the saw above the tensioning rod, or if that is simply too high | and unsteady when you use it. Weight isn't much of an issue, just | performance.
I don't think I'd bother with handle below the blade. I'd guess that it might make starting a cut somewhat easier with really agressive blades; but if it gets in the way, I'd omit it.
Be nice to yourself and the saw - roll the log onto something that holds it off the ground for sawing. There isn't any part of a saw that likes dirt and gravel. Even a foot-long piece of 4x4 can save a lot of wear and tear.
Weight can have a substantial effect on the /sawyer/, which will affect performance.
| So, can anyone spot any holes in my plan that I may have missed? | I'd hate to use the last of my rock maple, and then have to smack | myself upside the head because I forgot something really important. | I can always try again, but it's nice to do it right the first | time. I've also got a good plank of 4/4 ash that I could use, if | it's a better wood for the job (It has more spring than maple, | IIRC.)
Unless you're trying for a masterpiece on the first try, build it out of whatever you think'll hold up decently - then you can feel more free to rebuild individual parts for greater ease of use, comfort, etc. I built my first from pine and ended up doing a fair amount of sanding to make the handle comfortable.
| To try to anticipate the inevitable requests for more info, the saw | will be for cross-cutting logs for turning blanks because I don't | have a chainsaw and can't afford one right now (at least, not one | worth having). I'm making it, and not buying it because I want a
While there's a certain amount of satisfaction to be had from making the saw and using it to cut blanks for turning, don't overlook the possibility of renting a chain saw so that you'll have time and energy left over for turning. :-)
| If it works out well, I'm considering a frame saw for resawing short | planks out of some of the trunks I come across (hard to find spalted | wood at the lumber supplier, after all) so any good links to nice | rip blades for a hand saw would also be appreciated!
Interesting! Don't forget to post photos to ABPW...
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wrote:

I had considered that, but as I sat there in the middle of the hardware aisle while my wife was waiting in the car, I figured I'd better just nab what I good and get back before she roasted in the sun... That may be an upgrade later on, though.

Okay- sounds like dowels don't matter much for this one. I sort of thought they wouldn't, but I figured I'd float the trial balloon.

Got ya. Never had a problem starting cuts with the other saw, and this is the same blade, so I'll nix it. Just didn't want to skip something that was there for a reason I didn't understand, and regret it later.

Only problem with this is application- The wood I generally collect is blown down in storms, not logged, so it's often still attached to the stump by a sizable bit of sapwood and bark. Sometimes it can be chopped free with the axe, but sometimes it's too *bouncy* and the saw just works better. Once it's home, then I use something to get it up off the floor- it's just not always very easy in the field.

I suppose- but I'm an awfully big guy who does a lot of manual work. What's light for me may be heavy for others.

I don't know about a masterpiece- but I'd like it to look like I cared when I made it!

Point taken- I generally harvest wood on weekends, and turn after work during the week, so they don't interfere with one another *too* much.

I won't!
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Morris Dovey wrote:

The handle below the blade is useful for controlling twist. If it's a big buck saw and you're using it with two people for rough firewood crosscutting, then it's worth having.
I wouldn't have it on a workshop bow saw, but I would put one on a firewood saw.
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Regarding your buck saw, don't use curly maple...
The one I made that didn't break is made from Doug Fir. I used roll pins to hold the blade in place, and a rawhide shoe string to tension it.
Works pretty well but instead of a straight "H" I should have angled the uprights in for more of an "A" frame to get a more comfortable grip on the saw.
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