Making a 70.6 cut on miter saw

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Apparently I wasn't selecting the right characters. With the Times New Roman font, the characters after the Tilde (starting with the no break space) start showing codes on the lower right.
Why not show the codes for each character, so Character Map actually reflects the functionality that's there? Probably some historical reason...
Puckdropper
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Never teach your apprentice everything you know.

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On 2/21/2010 1:13 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

I think they're seeing the use of the ASCII codes as "legacy". They only seem to be showing codes for symbols that don't have a marked key.
There's a way to turn on using the Alt key to get the hexadecimal Unicode symbols but it doesn't work in Windows Mail. It does work though in Thunderbird: ALT-+-B0 gives ° (note-you gotta have the "+" in there), as does ALT-0176, but ALT-176 gives ░. Weird--Thunderbird works exactly like the Microsoft docs say that an application is supposed to act, but Windows Mail doesn't.
You might want to bring up notepad or Word or something and give it a try--if your machine is not recognizing the ALT+hex Unicode combinations, <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alt_code> tells how to turn it on.
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Thanks, J. Clarke. I just tried it, and apparently will have to follow the Alt_code instructions to get the hexadecimal entry to work. Notepad would "ding" at me when I hit the plus key, while Wordpad appears to eat the plus and keep going.
My understanding of this Windows feature has deepened quite a bit.
Puckdropper
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On 2/22/2010 5:51 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

This is interesting--where you quoted my message, the unicode character for the degree sign got split into an A-circumflex followed by degree, and the Alt-176 gives a-circumflex followed by a grave accent. I guess that's what happens when you feed Unicode to a non-Unicode-aware application, it tries to make two letters out of it.

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Puckdropper wrote:

It's there on my Win7 machine.
Try scrolling and watch it flash by - again not all characers have a keyboard equivalent.
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wrote:> When faced with a new problem, it is often helpful to reduce this new

Well, at least there's SOMEONE here with a sense of humor.
A mathematician knows that rule: problems are either trivial (we know how to solve them), or hard (we don't).
As it happen, maestro, I HAVE solved this one. Not this exact one, of course, but once in the distant past I had to cut an angle of 2.35333333333333333 degrees, and I made a template from it. All I have to do is produce twenty-nine exact duplicates of it, stack them up on the miter gauge, and I've nailed this 70.6 degree problem.
So what else have you got for me?
Tom
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wrote:

Are you talking MARKINGS or STOPS? My Miter Saw has lots of litt;e degrees painted in/on the scale but the only stops are at 90, 45, 37.5(?) and 15 (I think).
Not that this information "solves" your problem, But it might open you up to another way of looking at the problem - out of the markings on my saw box, Tes? No?
You didn't mention the stock you were using and the dimensions of the noard(s) to be cut at the indicated angle.
Since you mentioned Miter Saw, folks are likely to think of dimensions usually cut on such a saw - no 4 x 8 sheets for instance - and offer suggestions based in some part upon this premise.
Having said all that, thanks for your post as it unearthed quite a nice load of information.
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