Make a set of Salt and Pepper Shakers

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Just released this today:
http://www.garagewoodworks.com/video.php?videow
-Brian
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Clicked on the link and the page opened. Hit play and just got a black screen.
Larry
On Wednesday, March 13, 2013 9:51:03 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

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On 3/13/2013 9:40 PM, Gramp's shop wrote:

Looks like it might be a personal problem, Larry.
I just clicked on it and it plays just fine. I've got a less than stellar wireless broadband connection here at home so it dragged a bit but it did work.
Give a another shot... Sometimes whien I click on these links, all I need do is refresh the page if the video doesn't play and the second time is the charm.
Nice quick project, Brian. Thanks, as always, for posting!
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On 3/13/2013 10:40 PM, Gramp's shop wrote:

Works fine here, have you got flash installed? Is it current, some browsers are now blocking older version.
--
Froz...


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snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

Totally amazing. He used the following power tools to make a salt & pepper shaker: * Planer * Table saw * Jointer * Drill press * Miter saw
and maybe others I missed.
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On 3/15/2013 7:12 AM, HeyBub wrote:

I guess I'm missing your point, Heybub, what is it?
I could make a reasonable guess about your point if Brian had purchased all those tools with the specific intent of turning out one (or even a gross) of those S&P sets, but he didn't. He whipped out a simple project using the tools he happened to have available. Where's the harm?
If he'd done them with a draw knife and an auger would we be chiding him for ignoring his modern tools and doing it the old fashioned way?
What was it they said in recruit training? Oh, yeah... "Smoke 'em if you gottem!" Not go out and buy a pack and start smoking.<g>
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On Friday, March 15, 2013 8:12:55 AM UTC-4, HeyBub wrote:

Interesting comment. Totally amazing, he used all those words (he, used, tool, pepper, salt etc.) and I still don't understand the point.
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On 3/15/2013 10:21 AM, snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

You got to use a bunch of tools! Bonus! And no heavy lifting. Bonus Bonus. ;~)
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"Leon" wrote in message

Yup... Sometimes it's nice to knock out little projects that use almost every tool in the shop... a little near instant gratification can go a long ways when thrown in between weeks or months long projects!
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On 3/15/2013 8:12 AM, HeyBub wrote:

Indeed. A couple acres of land, chain saws, a sawmill, forklifts, and a couple of trucks at the very least, not to mention a power plant, an oil tanker, a refinery...
Your point would seem to be that there is some sort of overkill going on, to which I can only observe that making rectangular prisms out of wood seems to require similar equipment whether the prisms are small or large.
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On Friday, March 15, 2013 10:21:18 AM UTC-6, Greg Guarino wrote:

couple of trucks at the very least, not to mention a power plant, an oil tanker, a refinery...
And don't forget SketchUp.
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"Sonny" wrote in message
On Friday, March 15, 2013 10:21:18 AM UTC-6, Greg Guarino wrote:

...and the permission of the government that allows for all this dangerous stuff. ;~)
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On Wednesday, March 13, 2013 9:51:03 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

Worked fine today, Brian. Neat little project, well done.
Larry
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On 3/13/2013 9:51 AM, snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

I am going to buy some stock in Franklin Glue company. ;~)
I seriously believe you applied 5 times more than you needed.
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I've been wondering about that myself. I've always been afraid of a lot of squeeze-out. (for values of "always" that include as few projects as I have attempted so far). Brian seems entirely unconcerned about it, probably because he knows something (a lot) that I don't. .
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On 3/15/2013 8:00 PM, Amy Guarino wrote:

Actually you only need enough glue to cover both surfaces. Anything beyond that ends up on the work table.
After only 35 or so years of doing this I have learned to apply enough to form a very slight bead after clamping. And after 35 years I have learned to keep my fingers out of the glue. :~).
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Around '69 or so, I took a school shop class and we did some small layups. We used a lot of glue, and we actually used Elmer's white glue as preferred by my shop teacher. I don't think there was widespread use of yellow glue at that time. We put enough glue on our layups that cleanup and was always a huge issue.
Next year, I was in a better school with a better shop, and layed up some walnut to make 5"X5"X12" blocks to use as blanks to make candlesticks on the lathes. More glue on the floor than was on the rest of my projects that semester.
When I got out of high school and went into the trades I worked with a professional carpenter for the first time. His goal when doing a glue up was to have a "detectable" squeeze out. So I learned when laying up to put a tiny line on an edge, making sure the wood was moist with glue from edge to edge and then clamped.
After that, I found that my own glue usage dropped by about 75%. And using that method to this day, never had a liquid glue failure.
I think the glue bath technique was started by people that were unsure of what they were doing, and were of the "more must be better camp". It could also be associated with the fact that adhesives from 50 years ago weren't nearly as effective and forgiving to use as they are now. Since a lot of woodworking is taught by selling folklore and stuff someone saw their grandfather do to one another, the idea of the glue bath has hung on.
Robert
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On 3/16/2013 12:11 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

We used Weldwood glue in school bud did not slather it on, just enough to coat the surfaces.
To sum up, the best glue joint is a very thin one, one that you cannot see the joint. How much glue do you suppose it takes to fill that gap? Any glue you see after clamping is excess.
I watched a video with that Chris guy, from one of the magazines, glue up several panels edge to edge. He slathered on the glue, smeared it with his finger, and laid it all on the floor to flatten it out while he applied the clamps on the top side. Needless to say, a farkin mess on the floor. I had to think to my self, who the hell is learning from this? Reminded me of the other guy that had the TV show and called his SCMS a Radial arm saw. Oh and then the guy On DIY TV, The Ultimate Work Shop. The look on his face was priceless when he was demonstrating how to cut a dado with a stacked dado set. The board he was pushing through with the miter gauge only went as far as the splitter on the blade guard.
Robert, you and Swingman and I should start our own TV show. It can start out with the two of you standing on both sides of me testing the sag on my desk cabinet. :!)
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I can see it now....
"Woodwerkin' from Texas" starring the least opinionated guys you will ever meet!
Hah!
Although, I think I must say that desk would indeed probably HOLD all three of us pretty easily!. Even with my girlish frame.... ;^)
Robert
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I read this part of his thread to Kim. She almost lost the mouth full of coffee and ROTFL.
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