Mahogany versus Mahogany

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circumstances, but there are some important errors here that need to be corrected.

virtually extinct species often called "Cuban Mahogany" (Swietenia mahogoni of the family Meliaceae). My understanding is that one simply cannot (at least legally) acquire non-recycled mahogany on the open market.
+ + + Just about right, except that an even beter grade of wood from the same species came from Haiti, before Cuba came into the picture + + +

definitely distinct species (Swietenia macrophylla). This is the closest any currently available wood gets genetically to "classic" mahogany.
+ + + Pretty much spot on + + +

nyasica) is also related to "classic" mahogany, but is quite different in appearance and characteristics. It most definitely is not "meranti" (see bolow), and is quite dense (32-34lbs per cubic foot) and hard. It is readily available on the open market.
+ + + You forgot Khaya grandifoliola and Khaya senegalensis (the latter is somewhat heavier 50lbs/ft3 as compared to 35-48 for the other species).
There is also quite a bit of other stuff from Africa marketed as mahogany, and sapele, sipo/utile, kosipo are indeed related to the real mahogany. + + +

of woods in the Shorea species. True names for these woods include Meranti and Luan. Meranti, in particular, comes in a range of colors (pale yellow to dark purplish red) with physical characteristics that differ significantly (for example, the relatively more dense, and more rot-resistant woods tend to be of the dark red variety, often marketed as "Dark Red Meranti", or, gasp, "Philippine Mahogany"). In general, while Meranti woods can be heavy (up to about per cubic foot), it is not as hard or strong as Honduran or African Mahogany. Along with African Mahogany, it is also less rot resistant than Honduran Mahogany.
+ + + Shorea species can be quite heavy (easily over 62.5lbs/ft3). These day the Philippines don't export wood anymore. Note that all Shorea species are from SE Asia and accompanying Pacific, never from Africa. Trade names include lauan, seraya, meranti, balau, bangkirai, etc + + +

"mahoganies" for inclusion in a (the?) newsgroup FAQ.
+ + + Sounds like work ;-) If ever my book is published I will be very clear on the topic, but pictures are everything here. + + +

newsgroup for being such an incredible resource.

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