Mahogany

I bought my wife a caned wood rocking chair. It's mahogany. It's coming knocked down for shipment. What glue works best with mahogany?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/21/2010 12:40 PM, Lil Abner wrote:

Regular "yellow" glue (e.g., Titebond I, II, or III) will work perfectly. I would argue that it's "the best" glue for mahogany in the context of straightforward joinery in furniture.
--
Free bad advice available here.
To reply, eat the taco.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I work with mahogany quite a bit and I absolutely agree with Steve. Little- Abner, if I were you I would stay away from any poly-urethane glue, regardless of brand name. The Tite-bond works extremely well and does not tend to degrade with age. I have found that urethane glue do degrade.
Deb
Steve Turner wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lil Abner wrote:

it will likely come with assembly instructions, and maybe even with the glue you're supposed to use. it may not need any glue but use mechanical fasteners instead.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lil Abner wrote:

As another said, being shipped as a knockdown may well mean it's mechanically fastened; much is. Then again, if it's a kit it may be intended to be glued.
If it is, as another said, any of the wood glues will work; not only a yellow glue but plain old white wood glue is about as strong.
The only question would be whether one thought there was potential to want to knock it down again in the future; in that case one would choose hide glue as it is reversible.
Just whatever you choose, do not use one of the "gorilla glue" types for this purpose.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/21/2010 3:29 PM, dpb wrote:

It's all glued with four screws in the two arms. Once assembled that's it...I hope. What about Gorilla Glue?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lil Abner wrote: ...

What about it?
It (the original which is what I'm speaking of--I understand they have introduced a wood glue which I don't know about) is a polyurethane glue which has nothing to recommend it for woodworking other than if one needed true waterproof glue for outdoor exposed use. It isn't as strong in tests as "ordinary" PVA glues (Titebond, Elmer's, whoever) although that's not the prime dissatisfaction; that is reserved for the long drying time and the foaming it is susceptible to...
All in all, it's not of much value for general woodworking.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
says...

I tried it a couple of times and tossed it as far as I could. Pain in the butt even if it did give strong joints, which it doesn't particularly.
If you need waterproof go with epoxy or resorcinonl-formaldehyde. If you need almost-waterproof go with Weldwood plastic resin or Titebond 3. For general use any of the Titebond family works fine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Good for butcher-block type lamination, won't dull sharp tools. Holds up quite well to weather. I have a cellar window case I glued in ten years ago with cheaper Elmer's brand urethane glue which still looks new.
Otherwise, type I carpenter's glue is ideal for bonding open grained mahogany.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lil Abner wrote:

--------------------------------- It's over priced and under peckered.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I use it to glue metal to wood......
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.