Magic Moulder Evaluation on the Radial Arm Saw


At the request of Forrest Manufacturing (maker of Forrest Saw Blades) I recently made an evaluation of the "Magic Moulder" system to determine the suitability for use on the Radial Arm Saw. I use the radial arm saw exclusively in my production shop and I'm always looking for ways to add to my shop capabilities so I jumped at the opportunity to do this test.
I currently use the original DeWalt moulding sets from the 50's, the Sears and the Delta moulding head systems in the shop for edge shaping and face moulding. I also use these moulding systems for out of position mouldings, i.e. the RAS motor in the rip position and tilted to produce a moulding that can't be made on the conventional shaper or router table.
I tested the "Advanced Starter Assortment Set", which is includes a 7" diameter moulding head and four cutter "plugs", P-37, P-65, P-58, P-64. Also included in the starter package are the Owners Manual and a short video that shows installation and operation of the moulding set on a table saw. The aluminum moulding head has a 5/8" bore and the center of the head is recessed for use on short arbor saws, it is designed to operate at 3450 rpm. The cutter plugs are steel and feature a 1" wide carbide tip. Also available from Forrest is the "Magic Shaper" which has a steel molding head designed to operate at 10,000 rpm for use on a shaper and uses the same Magic Molder cutter plugs.
The Magic Moulder was tested on a DeWalt 7790 radial arm saw (17 amp 110 volt/8.5 amp 220 volt) and a DeWalt MB radial arm saw (9.8 amp 110 volt). The Magic moulder installed on the 7790 with the hardware provided. Due to the short arbor on the MB, the moulder head was installed without the standard outside arbor collar and required a thin locally supplied flat 5/8"bore washer under the arbor nut.
Various hardwoods were tested, including red oak, MDF, and hard maple. The Magic Moulder performed well, and produced mouldings with a better finish than the Delta, Sears and DeWalt systems. I was impressed with how "smooth" the operation was; you could hardly hear it in use. The cut radius is greater than the Delta, DeWalt or the Sears moulders, so the cutters are at a higher tangential velocity, which also makes for a smoother cut. Virtually no tear out was found on finished mouldings. Edge moulding/shaping was done with the motor tilted arbor down and positioned behind the fence. The wood remains safely flat on the table and pushed past the moulding head. Tests were also made with the motor in the "in rip" and "out rip" positions where the wood is pushed under the moulding head in the same way you rip wood on the radial arm saw. Motor out of position tests were made with excellent results. Again, smooth operation and little to no tear out was found. The Magic Moulder performed equally as well on the lower power DeWalt MB radial arm saw.
The Magic Moulder has received many accolades when used on the table saw, but on the radial arm saw the Magic Moulder excels. You have the ability to produce out of position mouldings far greater than the maximum tilt of the table saw. The width, height, and length of mouldings made on the radial arm saw are unlimited.
The Magic Moulder is a great option for the small or production shop and offers the advantage of mouldings that can't be made with conventional moulding bits used on a shaper or router table. Currently there are approximately 80 standard cutter profiles. By changing cutters you have an unlimited moulding library. The small shop or home builder will find the Magic Moulder works well for producing, crown mouldings, casings, and base board etc. on the job site. Custom profile cutter plugs are also available.
The Magic Moulder is available directly from Forrest Manufacturing in their New Jersey Office: 800-733-7111 ext. 314, Ask for Charles, he is in charge of the Magic Molder project. He has some introductory specials available. Phone him at the above number or Fax him at 973-471-3333 attn. Charles, or email him snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com . Charles can send you sales information by snail mail, fax, or email attachment.
If you have questions about my tests or are interested in using the RAS for moulding, kindly place your questions on the Radial Saw Forum: http://forums.delphiforums.com/woodbutcher/start Images of mouldings produced during this test are posted on ABPW
Disclaimer: Other than being a Forrest Blade user, I have no connection to Forrest Manufacturing. I received no compensation for performing this test.
Cheers,
Rumpty
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rumpty wrote:

Nice job on the report and thanks for the review.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pardon my ignorance of the capabilities of a RAS, but wouldn't a molder hanging from a RAS head create vibration, movement and CHATTER because the head can never be made rigid enough to remain 100% motionless in relation to the table? A table saw's arbor doesn't move in relation to the table and consequently I get superb results from a Sears molder when used on my Unisaw. Also the Sears molder is a 3 cutter unit; the Magic molder, if I'm not mistaken has only 2 cutters.
This is a serious post; please don't be flip. <g>
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Rumpty tested with a DeWalt 7790 and a DeWalt MB, which have substantial cast iron arms. Both are very rigid machines, and I have no problem believing that these saws would not move or vibrate. I would be less certain if he had used one of the newer "homeowner" models currently being sold by Delta, Rigid, or Craftsman. Assuming a reasonable feed rate, even these machines may be adequate, since the MagicMolder is apparently well balanced.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No. You DO need an education on the RAS.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So educate us.
When I use a spindle moulder (shaper in the US) it's a great big hefty cast-iron thing. I still have to worry about rigidity.
With a RAS, then the beefiest I can think of is a Wadkin BRA - big cast-iron thing. Now these are pretty solid machines and not prone to the "alloy extrusion and undamped wobble" problems that give most RAS such a bad name. All the same though, there's about three foot of distance through the column and the arm, and a couple of movable adjustments or slides, that you just don't have on a spindle moulder. So concerns over a RAS' lack of rigidity are far from unreasonable.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Andy, for "most" moulding shaping operations on the RAS the motor is positioned at the post so you don't have a 3' lever swaying in the breeze.
Regards, Rumpty

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The flywheel action of the Magic Moulder produces a very smooth finish. Take a look at the hard maple sample I put on ABPW, do you see any chatter there? It produced the best finish of the 3 systems I tested against. The poorest finish BTW was the "Sears" set up because there isn't enough mass there to eliminate chatter.

Perhaps for moulding on a board face, but you really can't tilt the arbor very far on the TS to produce out of position moulding. The RAS can be positioned anywhere for many many profiles. For edge shaping on the TS the board needs to remain vertical to the table and you have lousy control of your board. On the RAS the board remains flat and you can see the cut in progress.
Keep in mind, foks have been making moulding of the RAS for years, it's a great tool for moulding that can't be produced any way else with out expensive machinery. If you are interested in using the RAS for moulding, join us on the RAS forum http://forums.delphiforums.com/woodbutcher/start and purchase a copy of the Mr. Sawdust book "How To Master The Radial Saw" http://mrsawdust.com it's a superb book for using the RAS for moulding.

You do have quite a reputation David.
R.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rumpty wrote:

As do you, if we're talking about RAS's! <g>
Thanks for all the info. The rigidity of the RAS must far exceed my ignorant expectation. Bear in mind I've never used one or inspected one close up.
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
An associate dropped me an email with the following comments:
"Just to set things straight the Magic Molder is a product manufactured by and available from LRH Enterprises Inc. in Chatsworth, Ca. While Forrest may be selling them, LRH was the creator/designer manufacture. Just think credit should be given to the correct people. As I recall this has been on the market for quite awhile and proved itself well for the small or home shop. "
Indeed the Magic Moulder is manufactured by LRH. I performed this test for Forrest since they did notwant to sell it as a tool for use on the RAS without proper evaluation.
Rumpty

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.