Magazines

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There's an excellent article in the current "Atlantic Monthly", which is not exactly a conservative mouthpiece, that explains why Saddam was thought to have so much WMD capability.
It's a very well written article, worth the cover price of the magazine by itself.
Barry
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If we have any sense - YES.
Dave Hall
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If only he would drop that absurd amnesty bill he is pushing. When Bush was talking I had Clintonesque flashbacks. I remember Bill saying, "It all depends on what your definition of 'is' is." Bush basically did the same thing with the definition of amnesty. I wish there was a "real Republican" running, but he's it. He's better than any of the dwarfs from the Democratic side. What I have to do is contact as many of my friends as I can to contact representatives and senators and ask them to fight and defeat this bill.
Glen

President?
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> I subscribe to all and now must leave to wait for the postman...The new

==================================== I started subscribing to both Woodsmith and Shopnotes from Issue number ONE of each... I have every single issure of both "On File" in my shop. I rate Woodsmith a 9.5 and Shopnotes a 3.5 on a scale of 10 for USEFULLNESS in my shop....
I am retired and with all those issues of Woodsmith in the shop I will never be without a project...However I very very rarely build a project the way they do...I find some of their construction methods rather complicated and only marginally (if at all ) better then other methods...It is fun to play around with some of their methods, you learn a lot, but the shear number of projects I have "plans" ..lol... for just from this one source is more then enouth to carry me thru my retirement... Which I started 5 years ago...my HUGE supply of lumber that I stored for my retirement is almost gone and I have had to putrchase more BUT I am not at a loss for a project to build...
Bob Giffiths
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wrote:

But al lot of their stuff is so, _ugly_. <G>
Barry
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Do A Google Search (DAGS) for "magazines": http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&group=rec.woodworking
But in a nutshell, there is a lot of cross-over as far as content (tool reviews, how-tos, projects, etc). Some have a slant towards a certain area (like FWW and ShopNotes), some have better tool reviews (less advertiser ass kissing), some lean more toward the hobbyist (like Popular Woodworking), and some distinguish themselves by just giving you more bang for the buck (like Wood). Here are a few quick notes I tossed together (as I am in a hurry).
Fine Woodworking (http://www.finewoodworking.com/): focuses on fine furniture building)
Woodsmith (http://www.woodsmith.com /): no advertising, typically has one furniture project (usually with a practical variation or two), a couple of related tips and techniques related to the project (like details on making some of the joints used in the project)
Workbench (http://www.workbenchmagazine.com ): workshop-oriented projects and other information
ShopNotes (http://www.shopnotes.com /): no advertising, lots of tips and jigs for your workshop
Wood (http://www.woodmagazine.com /): beefy mag, lots of info, projects, howtos, and ads
Popular Woodworking (http://www.popularwoodworking.com /): more hobbyist-friendly
Woodworker's Journal (http://www.woodworkersjournal.com /): similar to Wood but with much less content
American Woodworker (http://www.americanwoodworker.com /): similar to Wood but with much less content
codepath

and
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codepath writes:

Let's not forget Woodwork and Woodshop News. The latter is aimed more at the small commerical shop owner, but has a lot of info that hobbyists may find useful. Woodwork is an overall excellent magazine, aimed more at the artistic side of practical woodworking. Now there's a title no one is using these days: Practical Woodworking. Too, Popular Mechanics still does a lot of woodworking project articles. Ro Capotosto has retired, but Neal Barrett seems to be a very worthy successor.
Charlie Self "Brevity is the soul of lingerie." Dorothy Parker http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
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Charlie penned....Popular Mechanics still does a lot of woodworking

Popular Mechanics got me started in the hobby with their article about four or five years ago on getting started in woodworking. After reading the article and fondly remembering my high school shop years, I bought a Sears Router and Table (yeah, I know) and the rest in history.
Since that time I subscribe to every magazine mentioned so far (except Woodwork, have to look for that one) and I do more reading than anything else. I enjoy the ads, but Woodsmith is still the best magazine for newbies. My first full-project was a a Woodsmith blanket chest, and without ever cutting a rabbit before, it turned out great.
Joe
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On 12 Jan 2004 18:08:51 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@execpc.com (BIG JOE) wrote:

As much as people bag on Sears, I'll bet the number of us that started with Sears tools is incredible.
Barry
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Thank you very much! This is exactly the sort of insight I was seeking. I very much appreciate your time.
I did find a google's worth of magazines, but have no way of knowing them nor the time to try to find out myself.
Rich
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Rich Shepard wrote:

Perhaps I've missed a post, but I haven't seen anyone mention "Woodwork" yet. For artistic inspiration, I think it's the best. Not much "how to" stuff, but a showcase for real talent.
Rick
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Woodwork is an artists' magazine disguised as a woodworkers' magazine. It showcases a lot of wasted talent.
Can you tell that I am a function over form kinda guy? Take a look at the items at www.furnituresociety.org. I'm sure it took skill to build them, but it takes a lot more skill to build a piece of furniture that is both artistic and functional.
Dick Durbin
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:> Rich Shepard wrote: :> Perhaps I've missed a post, but I haven't seen anyone mention "Woodwork" :> yet. For artistic inspiration, I think it's the best. Not much "how to" :> stuff, but a showcase for real talent.
: Woodwork is an artists' magazine disguised as a woodworkers' magazine. : It showcases a lot of wasted talent.
Well, there are some items and articles that are artsy furniture, but most of the magazine -- and i've been a subscriber for years -- has functional, gorgeous stuff. I view the artsy stuff as a necessary evil, like the every-three-years articles on how to tune a plane, align a tablesaw, build a cutting board, etc. in other mags.
Another magazine well worth reading is Furniture and Cabinet Making, from England.
    -- Andy Barss
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snipped-for-privacy@bast.u.arizona.edu says...

Andy,
    I've been considering subscribing to Woodwork but have been somewhat reluctant because of the way-out stuff I've seen in some of the copies I've bought. So, from what you've been seeing, that is not really the norm?
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snipped-for-privacy@tfn.net (Dick Durbin) wrote: ...

Dick, I have almost every issue of Woodwork and while they have a fair amount of artsy stuff, it also showcases some of the best work from all over with good writing. They do a fair number of step-by-step articles where the pictures demonstrate the production and that's real nice. Doug Stowe is a frequent contributor too. ;p
That "artsy" stuff does cause a lot of consternation among Woodworks' readers. It's definitely NOT my favorite content but it is my favorite WW mag.
Cheers, Gary
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Good synopsis. I'll intersperse my personal opinion.

I've been a subscriber for years and it seems to run hot and cold these days. One issue will show a top notch veneering job and the next will have a guy building a basic bookcase with biscuits. They seem to have lost their focus.

This was my favorite for years as I climbed up the learning curve. Completely project oriented and generally using proper joinery - not biscuits and pocket screws.

I subscribed for a year then dropped it. There are a few basic jigs that every shop needs (resaw fence, tablesaw sled, etc) but beyond that it's building jigs for the sake of building jigs. You can get all the jig making advice you really need from any of the mainstream "generalized" magazines.

The last time I really read Wood was about 10 years ago and it was pretty basic stuff. Pukey ducks cut on a scrollsaw and screwed together children's furniture. I've skimmed it at the newstand occasionally since and it looks like it has improved.

This is my new favorite. For me it's the proper mix of hand and power tool usage. The project articles are in the middle ground - not low end Walmart quality screwed together stuff but not Philadelphia highboys either. The three or four issues I've read so far have had some original content - unlike most these days.

This used to be a great magazine until a few years ago when Reader's Digest took them over and dumbed it down. It used to occupy the niche that Popular Woodworking now has. After the takeover they changed their focus to building the kind of junk you can get at Walmart and their tool reviews got incredibly shallow.
Right now I subscribe to Fine Woodworking and Popular Woodworking. If I had to drop one it would be FWW. I have most of the FWW back issues, which are a great reference but I'm not seeing much original content anymore.
I just recently let Woodsmith lapse because I feel I've progressed enough to design my own furniture and have gotten competent at all the basic joinery. It's still the magazine I would recommend first to someone with only a few years of woodworking under their belt.
--
Scott Post snipped-for-privacy@insightbb.com http://home.insightbb.com/~sepost /

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I'll agree with what the others's have said. Personally I do Fine Woodworking (to see others build things I could never do) and Wood (to do projects on my skill level).
I won't subscribe to any others - but will page thru them at the bookstore and buy the occasional issue.
Some closing comments: ShopNotes, as others have said, is entertaining for about a year, but then wears thin. I don't really think I'll ever build my own lathe.
Workbench, has improved greatly in content, with the last few issues. I won't continue the subscription but will peruse it in the future.
American Router - a new entry - I found to be very disappointing. Won't be buying another issue.
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Ah, more quality insight!
Many thanks,
Rich
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I agree on American Router. Very poorly written magazine. Very little depth. One project called for some special hardware and they don't mention where to get it.
Woodpecker
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On 8 Jan 2004 18:10:03 GMT, Rich Shepard

I still get FWW because I have bought it since it came out. It was better when it was still in black and white.
It used to contain examples of work that a man could aspire to.
I'm not so sanguine as to it's merits in that regard, these days.
I have little in the way of counsel as regards secondary wooddorking sources, except to say, "love wooddorking and do as you will."
tom - who will prolly puke if he has to read one more butchered how-to article by some dude who don't know dick - regardless of the venue.
thomas J. Watson - Cabinetmaker (ret.) (Real Email is tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
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