Lpe or Ipe?

I have seen several references on a.b.p.w. to Lpe or Ipe, and I do not know what that means. Who has the straight skinny?
Hoyt W.
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On Mon, 31 May 2004 11:07:35 -0500, Hoyt Weathers wrote:

Pronounced "E-pay". Here's a reference:
<http://www.timberandmore.com/news/newsdettaglioeng.asp?IDART 54&LINGUA=ENG>
-Doug
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"A government that robs Peter to pay Paul can always
depend on the support of Paul." - George Bernard Shaw
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Hoyt Weathers wrote:

"ipe". Aka "Lapacho", "Brazilian Walnut", "Ironwood" and a few other names. (leaving aside the ones that it is called when one is trying to work it or when one drops a large piece of it on one's foot--it is rather heavy). Taxonomic genus "Tabebuia" (if I've remembered the spelling correctly), whether there are significant variations between individual species I don't know.
A South American hardwood not closely related to anything else. Very hard, very stiff, very strong, very decay resistant, color and figure are somewhat like walnut. Contains a yellow powder developed on cutting, sanding, etc called "Lapochol" that turns bright red on exposure to alkaline substances and is an allergen for many individuals.
Nice stuff other than the Lapochol and the density--it's very dense--put it in water and it sinks. Not horribly expensive as exotics go either. Have to be careful with the surface prep when gluing or finishing--stuff doesn't like to stick to it without help.

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--John
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Taxonomic genus "Tabebuia" (if I've remembered the spelling correctly), whether there are significant variations between individual species I don't know.
+ + + Yes, quite correct. Tabebuia counts some 100 species, and only some of these species yield ipκ PvR
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Ipe is a hardwood that is so heavy it won't float and so hard that you have to drill holes before nailing. It is great for outdoor construction and there are many articles about carefully selecting it and using it indoors.
I believe it is more weather resistant than Teak. I've used it for a few outdoor projects. It's kind of a neat looking wood if you get the right boards.

know what that

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I believe it is also sold in the U.S. as "ironwood", if you are familiar with that product. I've seen decks built out of it, beautiful stuff, and basically maintenance free.
It has been suggested it is hard on your tools, but carbide holds up OK.
Joe

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One of MANY iron woods.
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Joe Tylicki wrote:

And I'll bet you didn't know that a major importer (Timber Holdings) is located right here in Mahwaukee.
UA100
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I did not. We'll have to add that to our field trip list.
Joe

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Ipe pronounced "e-pay", is wood. The I is pronounced like the I in Indian. A Central and South American Iron Wood.
A great deck wood that has a life expectancy of 50 years un-treated. Will turn a silvery gray when expose to sunlight.

know what that

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