LP Air in the shop

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Looking for ideas on how to distribute LP air in my shop.
My shop is 18' X 22' and I have a stair case in the back corner, under which my compressor sits. Right now, I have a rubber hose running through the ceiling with just one outlet at a hose reel in the front of the shop. I would like to have the hose reel and a fixed outlet at the front of the shop, a hose drop in the ceiling in the middle and a outlet at the back. Maybe to elaborate for a small shop but things that make my work easier are a bonus.
I have looked at the Rapid Air System, seems a bit pricey at $139.99 for 100ft of hose, a compressor manifold and 2 outlets. I was also looking at building my own black pipe system that would give me the 3 outlets and the hose reel for less money and more labor.
Any ideas?
Neil Larson Crystal Lake, IL
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What type of air do you need to transport? Low volume where a small tube is okay or higher volume where a 3/8" ID or larger tube is needed?
If low volume, I'd simply put some plastic tubing with quick release fittings all over. Plugs are avaialble for the places where you don't need a tube too so you could make everything quick release.
Regards, Joe Agro, Jr. (800) 871-5022 01.908.542.0244 Automatic / Pneumatic Drills: http://www.AutoDrill.com Multiple Spindle Drills: http://www.Multi-Drill.com Flagship Site: http://www.Drill-N-Tap.com
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On Fri, 6 Mar 2009 14:51:05 -0500, "Joe AutoDrill"

in 12 feet, with a "T" pointing down where-ever you want an air outlet. On each drop install another "T" to bring the line out, with a "stub" on the bottom. Put a drain valve on the "stub" to drain out any condensation that gets trapped there. I'm using a braided steel flex hose to connect from the compressor to the wall-mounted line, but you could use a short chunk of air hose.
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"M" Copper is fine, unless you are running some ridiculous pressure. http://www.copper.org/Applications/plumbing/techref/cth/tables/cth_table3c.html Greg
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Not that it really matters right now, it seems however I read the table that M is OK for my 110# system, but I can't really understand the table. I don't get the column headings S=4900 psi 200F means what?

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It's giving the rating vs temperature.
-Kevin
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wrote:

price for 30 feet, I went for the "good stuff".
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It depends on the size. I see above 1" was mentioned. M would still be fine. Smaller diameters even better yet. Really 3/4" is more plenty for any home shop. 3/4" will flow well over 20 CFM at reasonable lengths. 1" is way over kill for 99% of us! Greg
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"Greg O" wrote:

Added storage caqpacity out weighs flow rate for most DIY installations.
2' Black iron with 3/4 side taps bushed as required is hard to beat.
BTDT
Lew
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I fit gas pipe for a living. Buy a tank, it is easier and cheaper!

Threading and assembling 2" black pipe is a pain, nothing I would recommend to any one without experience and a couple high quality 24" pipe wrenches! For the little extra you would gain in capacity you can pick up a tank and add in the system if you feel the need for more capacity. Unless you get the pipe for free I would not consider it, and even then I probably still would go with 3/4"!! Figure the price of fittings in the mix and I think most will agree. 2" black pipe will contain about 375 cubic inches per ten feet or 1.6 gallons.
I worked in a CNC machine shop, 20 HP recip compressor, later a 50 HP screw. We had 1-1/4" mains that served us very well. I will post a chart on binaries. It shows pressure drop of various pipe sizes at 100 feet. 1/2" at 100 PSI will flow about 16 CFM. 3/4" at 100 PSI will flow about 32 CFM. Greg
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wrote:

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Proper compressed air rated plastic tubing may be OK but plastic water pipe style can explode without warning.
John G.

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basement>125 PSI at compressor. Been in service for more than 6 years. Have 3 outlets. One at each end of shop and one outside. no problems so far. WW
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But that does not mean it won't blow. OSHA does not allow it and the tubing makers don't recommend it. May last another 6 or 16 years, may produce shrapnel next time you pressurize it.
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Agreed; the problem isn't so much that it can't withstand the pressure in general (it can), but that the failure mode when it fails is dangerous. Copper pipe tends to rend itself and split open to release the pressure; plastic (at least PVC) pipe tends to shatter into many shards. For water and such incompressible liquids, these shards don't get any great velocity because the pressure instantly decreases once released; but for compressed air, they are projected quite forcibly and become dangerous shrapnel.
Other kinds of plastic piping/tubing may be suitable for compressed air use, such as the kinds they sometimes make air hoses out of.
--
Andrew Erickson

"He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot
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wrote:

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WW wrote: ...

The last two words are the key phrase here.
For 1/2" the volume isn't large enough to be a huge threat but as others have said, not recommended application. The bigger threat normally isn't just a spontaneous failure but that any impact may produce an explosive fracture instead of just a break.
--
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I'm doing the same project in my shop. Apologies for a minor thread highjack.
I managed to score some black iron pipe at an auction for a plumbing shop that was moving out of state. About 60 feet of 1 inch, 20 feet of 3/4 inch and 20 feet of 1/2 inch. Way more than I need, but I got it for $30 (golly, is that my first gloat here?).
The problem is that a couple of the chunks are used. I guess for natural gas, but I'm not sure. There is some black corrosion/residue/something that flakes on the inside of them. Any suggestions on how to clean it out?
--
Frank Stutzman



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Frank Stutzman wrote: ...

Once you cut to length, might try a stiff (#10, say) wire thru pulling a brush first. After that, I'd just hook it up and use the air pressure to flush it. If add a screen/filter should be no time before all that's going to come loose is out.
--
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Agreed. It better be pneumatic tube and not your cousin's fish tank plastic tube or some PVC drain pipe stuff.
--


Regards,
Joe Agro, Jr.
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