low power drilling

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wrote:

He also said: "The joists are sitting directly on concrete, and the decking is 1 1/2" (you read that right) plywood."
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On 3/12/2010 12:17 AM Lew Hodgett spake thus:

Yabbut right after that he wrote:

Guess you missed that part, eh?
--
You were wrong, and I'm man enough to admit it.

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"David Nebenzahl" wrote:

Not engaging brain late at night will do that to ya.
Mea Culpa.
Lew
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On 3/12/2010 12:47 PM Lew Hodgett spake thus:

No problemo.
You just owe me a free pass the next time *my* brain goes pfffffft!
--
You were wrong, and I'm man enough to admit it.

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I can see it now: "This is your brain..... This is your brain on an air-hose. <pffffft!>"
`
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On Fri, 12 Mar 2010 00:17:04 -0800, "Lew Hodgett"

pull cable The joists are sitting directly on concrete, and the decking is 1 1/2" (you read that right) plywood..
I have access to only one side of ONE joist.
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Above the edge of each joist, drill (4) 1/2" holes centered over the joist and approximately 4" OC parallel to the joist and 2" OC across (spanning) it. Insert a saber saw with 1-3/4" long blade through the hole and cut across the joist and alongside it, connecting the holes. Pry the 1-1/2" plywood out of the hole and set aside. This will expose approximately 4" of the joist. Using a longer blade in the saber saw, cut a 1-1/2" to 1-3/4" wide slot in the joist, breaking the piece out. This will leave you with a rectangular cut in the joist adequate for your 1-1/2" pipe or conduit.
Glue and screw the removed plywood flooring back over the joist after you've run the pipe, leveling it with floor patching compound.
--
Nonny
When we talk to God, we're praying,
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On Thu, 11 Mar 2010 23:04:31 -0800, David Nebenzahl

OK - not in a house. Raised floor in what WAS an auditorium (theatre). Being made into office space.. The "face" of the platform (raised seating area) is all that is accessible. Need to get power and data into the center of that raised floorspace for 6 work-stations.
Make more sense now??
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RE: Subject
After rereading and hopefully understanding the problem, short of opening a seam thru that 1-1/2" plywood, as others have suggested, you can't get there from here.
Unless.....................
You approach this problem like drilling a well, only horizontally which will require significant cost to built all the componet parts.
Opening up a seam will probably less costly.
Back to basics, why is drilling necessary?
What is the purpose?
Lew
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As he said, he needs a cable pull.
I'd open a seam, notch the top of the joists, lay the cable (in a conduit would be smart for future access so you could use a snake) and seal the decking again.
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On Fri, 12 Mar 2010 13:08:28 -0800, "Lew Hodgett"

pipe couplings @ $1.24 each, 2 of 1/2 to 3/8 reducers @ $1.35 each, and 2 of 1/2 to 3/8 NPT bushings @ $0.89 each, plus a $16? 12 inch extension bit (7/16" hex both ends).
Half an hour of labour welding two halves of the extension int the pipe bushings and the extension was done.
Total cost less than $50.
Rented a 450 RPM drill and a 1 1/2" forstner bit for $14 for a half day - so total outlay still under $65. Half an hour to set up and drill the first set of holes and cut an access hole in the floor where the cables will come out, and just over 10 minutes to drill the second set of holes.
Labour included still under a hundred to get the job done. The boss is happy.
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On Thu, 11 Mar 2010 22:06:40 -0800, "Lew Hodgett"

Except haw are you going to get down between the joists and between the concrete floor and the raiised decking?.
You did not understand the problem. NO ACCESS. Only the face of the "platform" is accessible.

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I've drilled some long applications. About 8' is the longest, and never with the size cutter you are talking about. Depending on what you are using for extensions gravity can be a factor also. Break out may not be all that important depending on the application, but all bits I have used experience break out in wood. Some worse than others.
I have lost bits and extensions inside walls and other spaces. That is something to be avoided if you can, but there are a few of my bits still in some of those places.
Given that you are making multiple holes through 2 by you will want to consider that the bit will dull slightly after each penetration. To minimize breakout you will want to have a couple bits or atleast the ability to sharpen the cutting edges.
You may want to consider some kid of sleeve and a helper to hold the sleeve level (or slightly above level) while you work. If you are on the clock it may be cheaper and faster to just remove decking as some have suggested. Even if you have to replace some of it.
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I don't see any drill working, as the shaft diameter is always much smaller than the drill bit. To drill 6 joists with a 1 1/2" bit means the bit will drop about 5/8" with each hole as the shaft rests on the previous hole bottom, 5/8" x 5 joists (I am assuming the first hole will be accurate) = 3 1/8", so you will either have to start real high on the first hole or hit the concrete with the last hole. I cannot think of any way of getting such a large hole drilled through so many joists in one go. Can you not go around the ends and come in from there some how?
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On 3/12/2010 12:53 PM, EXT wrote:

Just needs a steady rest.
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On Fri, 12 Mar 2010 12:53:21 -0500, "EXT"

Absolutely no way.
And I did it today. Started with the first hole just clear of the decking - ended up abot 3 inches down from the decking at the other end.. And I had something like 15 inches of joist to play with.
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On Thu, 11 Mar 2010 22:46:55 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

We had to drill out a boat hull for a prop shaft and ending up welding an auger bit to a metal shaft. Had a jib for rolling the shaft and bit to get a good weld and hold everything true. A heavy wall pipe might work ok but we used solid. Did some grinding to be able to get a lot of fill.
Mike M
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On Mar 11, 7:46pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Well, a drill that makes minimum sawdust uses lowest power; I'd consider a length of black iron pipe with a tack-welded hole saw on the end. If you support the iron pipe outboard of your deck to be level, it should shoot straight enough to get to the destination.
Just get a (disposable) hole saw and a 20' length of pipe, fit 'em together and put a T handle or brace-and-bit on the drive end. One or two supports to keep the shaft level (you can drill the first hole with a standard setup, the shaft will rest in that hole and you will want to level it carefully before doing the second).
After each punch-through, retract the drill and pull out the wood plug.
It'll take a half day.
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You can't go AROUND the decK?
At the expense you're looking at, you could build a nicely trimmed valence box of some kind to hide the cable
I guess routing a couple channels into the deck wouldn't work either?
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On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 22:36:32 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@triton.net wrote:

I'll explain it again - ONE more time. The situation is this: A company I do a lot of work for is moving into a new office. The building was set up as a training center, with a theatre room in it. They need office space, not a theatre. The stage area was removed, and the lower level of the 2 raised seating areas was also removed, leaving the back third of the room raised about 17 1/2 inches above the concrete floor. We have electricity and data cables available at the edge of this raisedplatform that need to go to the center of the platform. There are walls on 3 sides Concrete on 2. Finished hallway on the other side. The only way into the space under the platform is from the front - from the room side of the platform. It is a solid wooden "beam" made out of 2X8 lumber, stacked 2 high.. There are a number of these, running across the room, parallel to that front edge, extending from the floor to the deck, at right angles to where the cable needs to go...
Removing the carpet and routing in channels might have been an option, but with power cables you need to be something like 2 inches down or covered with steel to protect the cable from nails etc.
The best way seemed to be to drill through the "joists" and pull in the cables.
I asked what kind of drill bit would take the least power to do the job - I had found s "speed-bor" type bit jammed when breaking through - and since I had to break through several times did not think it was the best solution.
Nobody gave me an answer about forstner vs auger. I did more research, and then got hold of a forstner bit and found it worked well - connected to 12 feet of 1/2 inch water ppe to reach all the way in..
I cut an access hole in the deck where we will be installing a "theatre box" ftom the removed stage to feed the cables through up to the workstatoions being set up on the raised platform (6 workstations with power, phone, and network cables for each) and tied a string to the extension after removing the bit to pull the cables in with.
I'll be installing the cables early next week.
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