Low Noise saw (any saw ;)...)

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At the Northeastern Woodworker's Association's Showcase this year I did demonstrations on using shooting boards. I kept cutting pieces off the end of the same board and then trued them up with the plane. What was kind of amusing was that after a while I had to intentionally make bad saw cuts. I started getting perfect miter cuts with the hand saw while supporting the work with the shooting board. Mind you I was using an L-N crosscut backsaw but still, it was a handsaw. I've been using my crosscut panel saw quite a bit lately and making square and plumb cuts isn't that difficult. It's a matter of paying attention and developing skill...
John
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I guess I've got something to learn then. Much of my woodworking is done in an apartment where noise is of a concern and my biggest difficulty by far is getting straight, parallel cuts to my satisfaction.
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wrote:

Yeah, give a nice handsaw a try- you can't really get a good one at the local borg these days, but you can order them from any of the mail-order companies that cater to woodworkers. Using hand tools only seems hard until you get a good one, and then it's a real eye-opener.
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Got a brand recommendation? Whatever I consider buying will have to be available somewhere in the Canadian market.
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Upscale wrote:

Maybe I'm missing something, look in your LV catalog. Last I heard, Robin was in the GWN.
Dave in Fairfax
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We're talking about hand saws right? I've got a 10 tpi Pax panel saw purchased from LV. Cutting an 8" board shows visible imperfections. Mating two boards end to end no matter how carefully I cut does *not* produce something that would be considered usable for flooring. I'm not clumsy using a hand saw nor am I inexperienced. So, either there's something I don't know about cutting boards, I'm not handling the saw properly or I'm missing something here.
The only saw apparatus that I've seen on the LV site that might produce cuts suitable for flooring is the mitre trimmer. It doesn't exactly say, but viewing it online suggests to me that it's capable of 90 cuts. http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&p2922&cat=1,42884
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Upscale wrote:

Easy there big guy. I wasn't saying that you were clumsy or inexperienced. I also wasn't saying that you'd get a sawcut that was smooth as a baby's butt. You asked about the availablity of high quality saws in Canada and I was suggesting LV. I don't think that saws give perfect finishes, even the Japanese ones. If you take a look at that shelf-O-planes I posted a while back you'll see a bunch of saws. You'll also see a bunch of planes. I believe in planes. They give you a smooth finish, so do the scapers you prolly can't see in the picture.
Dave in Fairfax
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It's ok, I'm not upset. I'm just keeping in mind the OP's request for a quiet way to produce cuts (night time operation) that are suitable for laying laminate flooring. Aside from the shearing method, or the edge planing method (which I feel is much too slow for production speed professional work) I can't envision anything else that would meet his noise concerns. Even if a Dozuki saw and some specialized usage can produce the type of 90 cuts obtained by a properly set up chop saw, I refuse to believe that it can be done nearly fast enough to be worthwhile using for production work.
If there's something else out there that I don't know about, then hey, I'm all for it. I like woodworking in the middle of the night as long as I'm comfortable knowing that an angry neighbour isn't going to be pounding on my door demanding why I'm making all that noise.
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Upscale wrote:

I don't know if the pax saws are high quality or not. The Independence saws, now made by Lie Nielsen and the Adria saws both have a great reputation. Possibly these are as good as the best antiques you could find.

I don't see why shearing or edge planing would be too slow. It is one additonal step after cutting, but a quick one. Of course there is time needed to hone the blade once every night or so that's a quick job with the plane, don't know about the shear.
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Something that impresses me during this discussion is that everyone is concentrating on hand saws and planes when laminate flooring is to be cut. This stuff kills carbide rapidly, I don't see any carbon steel blade standing up to it for any length of time.
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CW wrote:

Of course we are, OP wanted a quiet saw. There are no quiet power saws.
Honing the plane blade is a fast step.
Resharpening a Western style crosscut backsaw takes about 2-3 minutes, the teeth do not need to be jointed or set each time it is sharpened.
Replacement blades for the less expensive Japanese style saws are around $10, last I looked. A new blade should last for a few nights' work.
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snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net writes:

I made a "quiet power saw" by cutting 1/2" off the end of a Makita #79 reciprocating saw blade, and mounting it in a Ryobi scroll saw (which has clamp-type blade mounts).
Don't laugh, it works!
The saw itself makes almost no noise at all. The noise comes from vibration of the workpiece (as you might expect with any reciprocating saw).
The scroll saw is designed for freehand cutting, so it doesn't have a slot for a miter gauge. If you could rig up some kind of crosscut sled with a quick-release clamp, it might work for the OP's project. I just cut to a line by eye, which was close enough for what I was doing.
As someone else mentioned earlier, I think bandsaws also qualify as "quiet power saws". But they're heavy and the OP needed something portable (which is why I didn't use a bandsaw for my project).
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Kidding right? You've never cut laminate flooring have you? Using a steel blade, I used two just to do a few stair treads.
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Ever cut any laminate flooring? The substance used in the topcoat, this is the stuff that gives it its wear resistance, is aluminum oxide. Talk to Norton about aluminum oxide. That's what they use to make oilstones from. I wouldn't touch a piece of laminate flooring with any plane or saw I cared about.

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CW wrote:

No, I haven't cut laminate flooring.
Sounds like he's SOL as far as finding a quiet saw that'll do the job.
BTW, my oilstones are made from silicon carbide--harder than alundum. I've used both alundum and silicon carbide to grind glass and the silicon carbide in the same grit size is MUCH faster.
Someday I'll try honing on ground glass.
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Silicon carbide stones do a great job on axes and shovels. Don't really do much woodworking, do you?

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CW wrote:

Not sure what your point is about axes and shovels.
I mostly use waterstones for planes and chisels. The coarse or fine carborundum stones are good for grinding or repairing the bezel, much as one would use a file on a nicked axe.
Never sharpened a shovel, have you and why?
I don't do as much woodworking as I'd like to.
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snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net wrote: ....

Of course, and for the same reason one sharpens any cutting-edge tool...
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snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net wrote:

I've got hard packed clay soil and YES, I've sharpened the end of my shovels. The neighbors get pissed off when I set of dynamite to make a hole for my roses.
Dave
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snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net wrote:

I'd bet you've never cut laminate flooring! That stuff is so tough it's hard to cut with a brand new carbide tipped saw blade. Your post is merely uninformed conjectures.
Dave
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