Loose tenon

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Scott Lurndal wrote:
> Earlier this year FWW did a bit on joint strengths. Loose tenon > was supperior to m&t, pinned m&t and most of the other joint > types (with half-lap and bridle being the strongest).
My copy of that same report does not jive with the above with regard to loose/floating tenons ...
3⁄8-IN. MORTISE & TENON 1,444 lb. 3⁄8-IN. FLOATING M&T 1,396 lb. 3⁄8-IN. WEDGED M&T 1,210 lb. 3⁄8-IN. PINNED M&T 1,162 lb.
Traditional mortise and tenons were ranked 4th in the overall strength test, being about 3.5% stronger than loose/floating tenons of equal thickness, which came in 5th.
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Scott Lurndal wrote:

Hmm. Betcha they didn't test this one:
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/Projects/LLJ /
pinned or unpinned. It's the only joint I don't dare dry fit. :)
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Morris Dovey wrote:

Love it! Gonna run right out to the shop and grab my mortise chisel .... :)
Hell, with a CNC, ya don't need no steenking joints! All you need is a block of wood/whatever as big as the piece and program that puppy to cut away the superfluous material ... <G,D&R>
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On Tue, 15 Dec 2009 14:48:39 -0600, the infamous Swingman

I thought you'd be out there one-handing your Domino by now, Swingy.
-- Indifference to evidence: Climate alarmists have become brilliantly adept at changing their terms to suit their convenience. So it's "global warming" when there's a heat wave, but it's "climate change" when there's a cold snap. The earth has registered no discernable warming in the past 10 years: Very well then, they say, natural variability must be the cause. But as for the warming that did occur in the 1980s and 1990s, that plainly was evidence of man-made warming. Am I missing something here? --Brett Stephens, WSJ Opinion 12/09/09
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Got that little Multi-Router thingy, don't need no Domino. Besides, I lose my ass at Domino(es) _every_ Saturday night ... leaves a bad taste. <g>

Left in on porpoise ...
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In 100 years when the glue has turned to powder, pull on the pinned and un-pinned joints. Which is stronger?
On Dec 15, 10:13am, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

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Answer: Any good glue joint can last centuries. Its life will be shortened by moisture, heat and stress. Moisture on a tabletop is a common factor. Heat can be. And tabletop joints are stressed at the ends by the migration of moisture through the end grain -- that's why antique tops split on the ends typically.
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Scott Lurndal wrote:

If you do a proper job of pinning, and with the technique as a goal, you don't even need glue on an M&T joint. :)
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On Dec 15, 11:00am, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

A lot of modern glues will last centuries, but the glues of yesteryear included animal and milk glues that can be attacked by the right kind of fungus, even if dry. Formulations with fungus sensitivity give rise to powder where one knows there USED to be glue. Wood sap, too, is sometimes food for the beasties; old pine is more sturdy than old oak because the sap is resinous and indigestible.
Are modern 'hide glue' formulae made with fungicide? I don't know.
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SonomaProducts.com wrote:

Have the same dimensional changes that turned the glue into powder also either split out the section through which the pin passes or loosened the pin to the point that it long since fell out?

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J. Clarke wrote:

Indeed ... in many of these old pinned joints with no glue, you often see the detrimental effects of the stress of mechanical compression on both the pins and the exterior bore hole area, eventually ending in failure of the joint.
The "test of time" is (for) a relative term. :)
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I don't think I will be around in 100 years. In any case, I don't care if it falls apart after I'm dead. Being dead, nothing much is going to bother me.
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I hope to live on through my work much as Gustav Stickley or Sam Maloof (GRHS).

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The way thinking and things are going in this day and age you may still be liable, even being dead. ;~)
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On Mon, 14 Dec 2009 16:40:18 -0600, the infamous

I'd take it down a bit more, then glue on a thicker strip, and then cut to size if it were mine. I'd keep the gluelines away from one another (jus'cuz), though it probably wouldn't matter.
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