Loose tenon

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Any tips on how to repair a tenon that stood a little too close to the router bit, resulting in a loose fit in the mortise? I'm thinking about gluing a thin strip to each side of the tenon and taking another whack at it. Any other ideas will be appreciated.
TIA
Larry
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snipped-for-privacy@teranews.com wrote:

If it's not totally wacked you should be able to shim it with some shaving from a hand plane.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
  Click to see the full signature.
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" snipped-for-privacy@teranews.com" wrote:

Epoxy & microballoons.
Make a fairing putty with above, then butter the mortice, shove tenon into place, clamp and remove excess fairing putty.
The gates of Hell will rust shut before the joint fails.
Lew
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Where does one purchase microballoons?
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"GarageWoodworks" wrote:

I used a local industrial chemical distributor.
Cash only, 30 lb (4 cubic ft) bags, about $20-$25 a bag for Dic-a-Perl.
Check Yelow Pages
Lew
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GarageWoodworks wrote:

Among other sources Aircraft Spruce and Specialty http://www.aircraftspruce.com/menus/cm/fillers.html .
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"J. Clarke" wrote:

As long as money is no object.
Lew
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Micro-balloons can be purchases at hobby stores - airplanes and boats use it because it is light and not heavy... but strong. It is often used as a filler.
Martin
GarageWoodworks wrote:

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wrote:
Where does one purchase micro balloons?
Why, at the Micro Party Store, of course.
Get the Helium-filled balloons for a lighter project.
Pick up some little birthday candles while you're there.
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That is what I used to do when rebuilding old oak furniture. Assuming that your router is still set up as ot was before. Another trick I used to do was wrapping a couple layers of medical gauze arond it, then soaking it with a fari amount of glue.

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You could probably more easily and safely glue two thicker chunks of wood on to the tennon and have at it again.
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Sounds like you have it figured out.
"The sign of a truly good woodworker is his/her ability to effectively repair screw-ups."
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RonB wrote:

Hell, if that's true, I'm a master. Oh wait. You said "effectively".
Tanus
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veneer and sanding
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wrote:

veneer and sanding
I like that one. WW
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Yes, shiming with veener is pretty standard approach but am I missing something here. Bad loose tenon. I would throw it in the trash and make a new one. Or is it already glued in on one side?
Also, my typical rant on loose tenons. If you have a standard tenon and you pin it, then you have a joint that will last 100 years plus. Regardless of what happens to the glue. If you use a loose tenon and only pin one side or neither, it is not that same joint. In many cases, it won't make a difference or maybe make very little but on a chair or an apron of a table that will be dragged around, etc. It is not anywhere near as long lasting as the classic M&T.
Whew, now I feel better.

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Yes, shiming with veener is pretty standard approach but am I missing something here. Bad loose tenon. I would throw it in the trash and make a new one. Or is it already glued in on one side?
I could be mistaken here but I thnk it is a tennon that fits loosely, not a floating tennon.
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Duh. Oops, I think you are correct sir. I just saw loose tenon was thinking floating tenon. People use both terms right?

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Duh. Oops, I think you are correct sir. I just saw loose tenon was thinking floating tenon. People use both terms right?
I am not sure that I have heard "loose tennons" being described as floating tennons until you mentioned it. Therefore now that you have said it, "people" have used both terms. LOL
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Earlier this year FWW did a bit on joint strengths. Loose tenon was supperior to m&t, pinned m&t and most of the other joint types (with half-lap and bridle being the strongest).
scott
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