Looking for webbing for a chair seat


I've had this chair (with no seat) for so long, neither the wife nor I can even remember how we came upon it. I finally pulled it down out of the garage, cleaned it up, and put some finish on it. Now, it needs a seat. I'm not sure if "webbing" is even the correct term, but I'm looking for the material needed to weave a chair seat. All I seem to be able to find when I search is the cane or reed-type stuff (or nylon webbing for lawn chairs). What I have in mind is more of a fabric strip roughly 1" wide. I'd appreciate it if someone could point me in the right direction.
todd
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Todd Fatheree wrote:

The last time I needed the webbing I found it at JoAnn Fabrics.
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Buffalo, NY - USA
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Proper terminology is "tape," I believe.
http://www.morrisonschairs.com /
If that's what you're after, a search with proper term should do it.
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Webbing is also the correct term
http://www.rockler.com/ecom7/product_details.cfm?sku 0&filter=webbing
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wrote:

Not for the 1" wide stuff. What I think the OP is after here (if they want it 1" wide) is tape and _not_ webbing. They want to form the visible seat with it., not just support beneath the upholstery. This 1" visually acceptable tape is rare and hard to find. As it's sometimes known as "Shaker" tape, you can imagine the pricing rip-offs for it.
Besides which, on a seat you should use a cotton herringbone webbing, not the usual jute webbing used in most upholstery. For the weaving pedants out there I know that the herringbone isn't strictly speaking a webbing, but it's how the trade describes it. Don't use the jute stuff in a high-load situation on a seat or under springs, it'll stretch and go baggy in no time.
The Rockler struff you posted the link to is rubberised and usually known as "Pirelli" webbing. This is useful for simple lazy work on uncomfortable armchairs, but it's no use on an upright chair. Again you're asking too much strain of it and it will go loose fairly quickly.
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I did finally come across "Shaker tape" at http://www.basketmakerscatalog.com/cane/cane.htm#ShakerTape .
todd
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Actually I used this Rockler webbing to repair a rocking chair that had the zig zag springs that kept breaking. The webbing has held up fine for a couple of years now on a chairs that sees a lot of miles of rocking. The webbing has not gone loose at all. If you have seen some that has gone loose perhaps it was not stretched correctly when installed.
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and the retainers at Rocklers.
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http://www.rockler.com/ecom7/product_details.cfm?sku 0&filter=webbing
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instructions on how to do it. Michael http://www.hhperkins.com/
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I did find that on the Rockler site prior to posting, but it wasn't exactly what I had in mind. The stuff I'm looking for is designed to be wrapped around a round spindle.
todd
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