looking for tips re crown moulding install


Hello,
I have some crown moulding I'm about to install as part of a kitchen remodel/cabinet installation. This is the first time I've done any real trim work but so far I've handled the base, toe kick, scribe etc just fine.
The crown of course will be the trickiest part and the true test. Just a couple questions.
1) This crown is 38/52 and one sees the tables for the actual miter/bevel angles etc. If I just set up a jig to hold the crown at the spring angle while cutting it I can just miter it can't I? The height of the cut won't be a problem, this is a fairly narrow crown.
2) This is naturally finished maple. Pretty hard stuff. I have one (phew) cope to do. I found that a coping saw was a pretty difficult way of coping even the simple pine base I was using. It was much easier to use a jigsaw to cut away most of the waste and to make notches up to the curve and then use a chisel and rasp and file to clean it up. And that was just a simple clamshell curve. Any tips on what tools to use for coping hardwood trim? I can go rent tools, such as a scrollsaw, if I need to.
thank you for advice ml
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As it is a hardwood which I presume will be stained and not painted, you get one shot. That is, you can't, or shouldn't, be scarfing in repairs as you will see this. Also, you won't be using any caulk, so the joints will have to be perfect. That being said, you should use a power, compound miter saw of good quality, with a good quality carbide blade. As virtually no 2 walls are exactly 90 degrees, you should cope the ends. Use a hand held coping saw and a dremel or rasp to clean up. Go slow on the coping if you've never done it before. Speed will come with experience. It helpsto cut relief cuts when coping, to remove small pieces as you proceed. Don't forget that if the crown is larger than about 4 inches or so, you should put blocking up behind the crown on the 2 walls that run parallel to the joists. Otherwise there will likely not be anything to nail the top to. Of course you could get lucky and have a joist just above the crown, but not likely.
Steve
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On Sun, 5 Jun 2005 17:25:38 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Put it on the chop saw upside down at the angle it will lay on the wall. Once you are confident with the angle on your saw, put a pencil mark along the fence so you can easily get there again. Inside and outside corners will be simple 45 degree cuts.

We don't use anything but a coping saw. It takes some practice but it's not too difficult. With hard wood you need a blade with a lot of teeth. The biggest problem most people have with coping crown is not getting enough under cut as they cope. Lean the coping saw over a lot more than you think it needs...then lean it a little more. :-)
Mike O.
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