looking for source of cheap square drive screws

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wrote:

Au contraire, mon ami. If your bit sticks in the screw but isn't well retained, the drill comes away without it. The ball retainer gives it more oomph to pull out when it sticks because you have to drill to hang onto.
-- The human brain is unique in that it is the only container of which it can be said that the more you put into it, the more it will hold. -- Glenn Doman
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On 1/18/2012 9:51 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Still not getting it. I can release the drill/driver bit and it will hang on to the screw. Picture the drill just hanging there connected to the screw.
"Nothing" separates. I often have to screw the removed screw into a scrap of wood to be able to have enough grip to separate it from the driver bit. I have no problems with the driver bit coming off of the drill.
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wrote:

I guess we Left Coasters just think a little bit differently than you Texicans, Leon.
So, do you need to buy better bits which don't stick as badly, or do you need to buy cheaper bits which don't stick as badly? Pick one. ;)
-- The human brain is unique in that it is the only container of which it can be said that the more you put into it, the more it will hold. -- Glenn Doman
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On 1/19/2012 9:02 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Yes! That is a definite maybe. HUH? ;~)
Many years ago I used to show friends how well the SD screws stuck to the driver bit totally unlike a Philips head screw. Almost every time I am on my hands and knees inside a kitchen cabinet repairing or installing brackets for drawer slides the screw sticks in the driver, and I think to myself, what a wonderful world.. ER uh I wish these screws did not to this. LOL
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wrote:

I've found that some things are made so perfectly that they mate too well, so going to a different manufacturer or different grade makes just enough difference to keep it from happening.

If you're -that- upset, go back to using a magnetized bit and phillips screws, Leon.
P.S: Why don't you install dem glides while de top is still off the unit, so you have some room, boy?
-- I have the consolation of having added nothing to my private fortune during my public service, and of retiring with hands clean as they are empty. -- Thomas Jefferson, letter to Count Diodati, 1807
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On 1/20/2012 9:33 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

I hate both. And I have had Phillips stick well enough that the magnet is not adequate.
Nothing is perfect, square drive and or Robertson is the most convenient.

As I mentioned above, repairing slides does not afford the luxury of a missing counter top.

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wrote:

Huh? Oh, bit sticks in screw and driver comes away? Yeah, then you learn that rolling the bit out of each screw can be of service and make it a habit.

Um, so you're bitching about them, WHY?
-- I have the consolation of having added nothing to my private fortune during my public service, and of retiring with hands clean as they are empty. -- Thomas Jefferson, letter to Count Diodati, 1807
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On 1/18/2012 9:51 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Let me explain it this way, imagine putting a drop of super glue in the head of the screw and letting it cure with the bit inserted. It is that tight of a fit. Pulling on the drill and bit does not separate anything. Working the drill and bit back and forth 2~3 seconds finally works the bit free of the screw. AND that is easier when driving screws. Removing screws is a bigger problem.
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wrote:

Buy harder screws which don't tend to stick to the bit?
-- The human brain is unique in that it is the only container of which it can be said that the more you put into it, the more it will hold. -- Glenn Doman
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On 1/19/2012 9:04 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Well I think I am buying pretty hard screws, they seem to never misform and I almost exclusively use McFeeleys and Kreg screws. I don't want screws crapping out on me.
On another note and response I mentioned that it may be the heat generated that causes the screw to tighten up on the driver.
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wrote:

Have you ever had a drawer glide screw "crap out on you"? How dey do dat?

Which begs for a cheaper driver, which doesn't have the tight tolerances kept by the screw mfgr or the good bit mfgr. There will be no interference fit between the two.
-- I have the consolation of having added nothing to my private fortune during my public service, and of retiring with hands clean as they are empty. -- Thomas Jefferson, letter to Count Diodati, 1807
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On 1/20/2012 9:37 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

If you deal with many Philips washer head drawer slide screws you know that the indentation in the screw head is shallow. This greatly increases cam out potential and these things tend to be a pretty cheaply made screw so they the heads strip out or break off pretty easily. When you are reaching and balancing on your knees a perfect fit between the bit and the screw are marginal at best.
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wrote:

Heads breaking off and stripping out are usually either A) the result of an overtorque situation (so set your torque less on the driver) or B) the wrong bit for the screw or C) a bad angle on the drive. All are pretty easily corrected. When I see that happening to me, I usually try to pay a bit more attention to WTF I'm doing. ;)
-- I have the consolation of having added nothing to my private fortune during my public service, and of retiring with hands clean as they are empty. -- Thomas Jefferson, letter to Count Diodati, 1807
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On 1/20/2012 1:00 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Clueless?
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Yeah I just bought a few 1.5" drawer handle bolts with Phillips heads and they are pathetic for socket depth. It would seem in an attempt to keep the head thin they need to sacrifice a lot of depth in the socket.
Meanwhile you are usually putting them in on some odd angle, can't line your eye up with the screw (inside drawer). The clothes in the drawer are restricting you arm space and it's dark in the drawer. No wonder most of the drawer pull screw heads are catch hazards for the wife's satin / lace panties! hmmmm... maybe that's a distraction too??
-------- "Leon" wrote in message
If you deal with many Philips washer head drawer slide screws you know that the indentation in the screw head is shallow. This greatly increases cam out potential and these things tend to be a pretty cheaply made screw so they the heads strip out or break off pretty easily. When you are reaching and balancing on your knees a perfect fit between the bit and the screw are marginal at best.
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The reason I asked if you were using an impact drill/driver is that I've heard of some brands of Robertson screws misshapen slightly when the impact driver is working. It causes the screw to grab tighter to the bit.
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Sometimes if the bit gets stuck in the screw head, all you have to do is reverse the driver slightly. Usually releases the bit quite effectively.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 1/18/2012 8:24 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

Unless you are removing the screw. ;~) This is really a PIA when removing screws and cannot easily remove them from the bit.
If driving the screws I can wiggle the drill ad driver bit back and forth to facilitate the release.
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wrote:

Tap the screw sideways on a piece of scrap or the ground. It'll come off. Or stick with phillips and/or torx.
I would never suggest that anyone use a flat blade type screwdriver. AAMOF, I believe they've outlawed them in England now. <heh>
-- The human brain is unique in that it is the only container of which it can be said that the more you put into it, the more it will hold. -- Glenn Doman
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On 1/19/2012 9:08 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Believe it or not I have tried that and that does not always work. Typically I have to drive the screw into a scrap piece of wood and then pull on the drill while working it back and forth. It is not an always thing but it seems to happen when I am inside a cabinet.

I never use a flat blade to insert a screw, I only use it to remove a screw. If the screw needs to be replaced it is with a square drive screw. Big flat blades drivers make decent pry bars in a pinch though.
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