Looking for design input, please (long)

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You got it exactly! I think this will provide an esthetically pleasing appearance while reducing the number of glue ups necessary to cover all those backs! Tom
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Tue, Nov 30, 2004, 8:51am snipped-for-privacy@ewol.com (ThomasBunetta) wonders: <snip> if so eye appeal suggests the grain run vertically to match thesides, <snip>
The Woodworking Gods can't find that in any rule they wrote. They also say you could probably have the side grain run horizontally too, if matching was so important. Personally, I think vertical sides, and horizontal back would look fine.
They also can't find any rule they wrote that says you have to make the whole thing out of just one kind of wood. Besides, it's cherry, so your gonna paint it anyway, right?
JOAT Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind dont matter, and those who matter dont mind. - Dr Seuss
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<snip> They also can't find any rule they wrote that says you have to make the whole thing out of just one kind of wood. Besides, it's cherry, so your gonna paint it anyway, right?
Jeez JOAT, you REALLY like to tempt the Woodworking Gods, don't you <G> Tom
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Wed, Dec 1, 2004, 8:41am snipped-for-privacy@ewol.com (ThomasBunetta) says: Jeez JOAT, you REALLY like to tempt the Woodworking Gods, don't you <G> Tom
Hey, they're the ones who wanted the pink paint. I finally got them talked into yellow.
JOAT Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind dont matter, and those who matter dont mind. - Dr Seuss
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Frame and panel is the way to go on this. The Barrister type books case designs are from late 19th early 20th century originally. The ole' Stickley boys used frame and panel interchangably with solid sides/backs on all case work. In fact many designs could be ordered either way so you can stay true to the design no prob.
Do flat panels with just a single center stile. It will be fun to resaw some of that Cherry and plane it out nice and flat. You might try and use some similar dimensions for the rail and stiles as you use for the glass fram on the front. However, if the design you have has really small frame pieces just pick some bigger width.
You can also match the rail/stile details to those on the glass front frame. For instance, if the frame has a round over or chamfer relief, do something similar on the frame.
The frame and panel also gives a much more appealing look with all the shadows, etc, versus a three stack of cases that look like a fence or a retaining wall with just plain wood slats.
BW

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Thanks Bill, You have provided me with some neat ideas... Still pondering ideas, but I'll post pics on ABPW when the time comes. Thanks again, Tom

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Hi, How about mail-ordering some cherry veneer? Make a nice book-matched panel for the back of each bookcase. Lewis
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Thomas,
Thanks for the link regarding the mortise & tenon jig.
Regarding your barrister cases I would recommend you do as others have suggested and make a frame back and use either shiplap or a solid panel within the frame. Depending on your equipment surfacing the solid panels may be a hassle but it can be done without a widebelt or drum sander if you have the time.
Remember you can make the back frames with the same setups as your doors so that would help the workflow.
The frame/panel would look great and I think even if you did loose shiplap withing the frame it still would have a nice look, albeit a bit less common than a raised or flat panel. However if you can source some 1/4" cherry furniture grade ply for the flat panels you would save yourself a lot of time.
Sanding glue-ups is no picnic with small power tools, it can be done with hand planes but pretty frustrating unless you have well tuned planes and a nice solid bench. Otherwise you'll chatter and tear out even your friendly cherry.
But if time isn't an issue then turn on the radio, sharpen your planes and enjoy yourself.

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You're welcome... Fortunately there is a Performax 22-44 out in the shop, although I need to re-adjust for parallel (why do machines change over time?). I may call around to some local cabinet shops to see if any of the plywood you mention is available. Thanks for your input, Tom

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