Looking for a Unisaw miter gauge upgrade


Something less than $150 but accurate left and right of the blade. TIA.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Fireant" wrote in message

The Woodhaven Deluxe fits your parameters. I own one and would buy it again. Do a Google.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 11/06/05
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The Woodhaven is $119 on Hartville tools.
The Kreg is almost identical. But the Kreg adds a verier to add tenths of a degree adjustments, and lets you do micro-adjustments (100th of a degree).
$139.99 on Amazon which includes the 24" metal track (this sells for $39.99 at Woodcraft) and free shipping.
--
Sending unsolicited commercial e-mail to this account incurs a fee of
$500 per message, and acknowledges the legality of this contract.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
writes:

The Kreg is a nice unit and they probably have the kinks worked out. I bought one in the summer of 2004 and Kreg sent me 3 indexing pins and finally a new miter gauge before getting one that would lock in to 90 degrees with the indexing pin.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rockler has a sale on some items that may fit your budget http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page 261
I have both the 1000 and 2000 model with the 2000 being the workhorse. I purchased extra aluminum fence's for both and would not trade them for anything except a sliding table. If all you're doing is light to medium work, the model 1000 will work well but if you're cross-cutting longer, heavier pieces of stock, then you should look into the 2000. the manf is www.incra.com and one of their major resellers is WoodPeckers at http://www.woodpeck.com /
Worth the time to investigate.
Bob S.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

===========Well Bob G... is going to disagree with Bob S on this one... I own a Incra 2000 and it gathers dust in my shop...
I just find it very bulky, and heavy, in short I do not like how it FEELS... I will say that I have absolutely no complaints with its accuracy... I have been meaning to "step down" to a 1000 for yrears just never have ...
Bob G. .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I can tell you to avoid the latest Osborne. I went through 2 of them before giving up and exchanging for a Kreg. When setting with the indexing shaft extended full to 45 degrees both Osborne units had 2 to 3 degrees of wobble. When collapsing the indexing shaft to obtain 45 degrees it was rock solid. An apparent design flaw.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have the kreg, the alum bar can flex a bit if you are trying to start your cut off the table.
I've seen some sales for the Jess'em unit at a bit over your budget, but it looks like a tank!
I bought the kreg for the venier scale, but a steel miter bar would be nice vs the alum it comes in.
Alan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I have the (2) of the cheapest Incras (v.67?), with shop-made disposable fences.
FWIW, all of my 90's are done with sleds. Once you go sled, you'll never go back. <G>
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My dad built a custom sled to do angles a real work of art, he puts as much time into making his jigs as his toy making. I suppose being retired allows for that but he has always done this kind of thing.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 24 Nov 2005 07:37:42 -0500, "wayne mak"
If you're doing a lot of an angle, a custom sled can't be beat.

I know folks like that, I'm not one of them. My own jigs are pretty ugly, but they're fast and accurate. <G>
Seriously though... Once you've dado'ed shelf sides with stop blocks, or cut long, heavy, or identical parts on a sled, you'll wonder why you ever did it any other way.
For that matter, even tiny parts are great opportunities for sleds. Having something to hold the work while your hands are far from the blade is a great benefit.
<http://www.bburke.com/wood/sleds.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Ba r r y" wrote in message

Agreed. If I only had a shop that would hold a sled for every angle ... but even a sled that would accommodate every angle would do.
http://in-lineindustries.com /
IIRC, Leon has one ...
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 11/06/05
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hmmmmmm. A 40' storage container for sleds....
Nahhhh, my wife would never put up with it!
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
How many angles do you use? It would seem to me not that many but you might be doing some unique work.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"wayne mak" wrote in message

might
A myriad of angles, most never given precise angular measurement, but copied instead, and transferred to the jigs, shims, cutting tools, workpieces, etc., using adjustable "squares".
Copying the angles, many compound, on an antique chair, a project of which I am in the planning stages as we speak, is an excellent example:
http://www.e-woodshop.net/images/Chairlayout.jpg
... this thing has more angles than Minnesota Fats.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 11/06/05
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes I do, both left and right sided. I do not know what I would do with out them. The angles you set are dead on.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Rosebud?
--
Owen Lowe
The Fly-by-Night Copper Company
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 24 Nov 2005 12:22:33 GMT, Ba r r y

I think the cheap one (about $59) is the V27. The 1000 is more versatile but I like the size of the V27. If they would put that little degree pointer on the V27 I'd like it a lot more.
Mike O.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have the osborne and the incra 1000se. The incra is very nice, but the longer cross member for the osborne is good too so I kept both. The incra fence seems a little flimsy too and I don't find it as easy to adjust as they say. One thing I like about the incra is the ability to make sliding faces from MDF which I seem to find a need for a lot to prevent tear out. Can't do that on ther osborne. I have not seen a perfect do it all miter gauge yet.
MBR
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.