Looking for a tip to center my forster bit in my mortise

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I have to drill out some mortises that are NOT centered in table leg I am working on. That means I can't press the bit down to make a hole and flip the piece to see if the point goes into the hole I just made. I have been experimenting on some scrap but I am always a little off. Why do I care? Before I start I cut a line with a utility knife on the sides of the mortise to "catch" my chisel blade but if I am a little off, I lose one of the lines. Am I just being too picky or is there some tip one of you can give me to get it dead center? BTW, the mortise is 1/4" wide.
TIA.
Dick Snyder
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Use a fence that can be adjusted.
When get close, if don't want to make a precise fence, use shims to "sneak up" on it.
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wrote:

tip of the drill bit down to just tap the wood and then snug the fence up to the wood, I am still not getting the cut perfect. Maybe I should make fewer holes with my drill press thereby leaving a bit of my scribe line to catch the chisel blade.
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I'm saying set the fence and test. If it's proud, adjust it back a squinch. If it's now not perfect, it should be a little too far back. If so, use a shim rather than fiddle w/ it unless have one of the adjustable jobbies w/ the threaded positioner or have made something similar yourself.
There is, of course, the alternative of locking the quill down and measuring from the near side of the bit face to the fence w/ dial calipers, but that would seem over kill...
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wrote:

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Would a centre punch help with your alignment?
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the wood?
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Best regards
Han
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wrote in message

problem is simple one of alignment but I have gotten some good tips about how to do that now.
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the cut to help guide the fostner bit point in to the exact place you wish to drill.
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That sounds complicated. s
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When this has been done, put a centre punch in the drill chuck and align the job until the punch's point registers in the line.
Jeff
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Jeff Gorman, West Yorkshire, UK
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wrote

idea for the center punch
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"Dick Snyder" wrote:

Classic application for a plunge router and a simple jig.
Lew
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wood that is 7/8" wide. I like the idea of seeing what I am actually doing with the drill press.
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"Dick Snyder" wrote:

Guess I'm not following.
Router bit is visible as it penetrates wood.
Jig lets you maintain registration form piece to piece such as table legs, which will be more difficult trying to do on a drill press.
Lew
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piece of wood. I have a good fence that I made for my drill press so I can get repeatable results. This might just be psychological but it is hard to see through the router base to see what is really happening. I supposed if I used a router a lot for mortises there would be no issue. Clearly there is much less chiseling required with a router and jig and maybe none if I round the ends of the tenons to match the radius of the router bit.
Dick
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"Dick Snyder" wrote:

I was going to say, "Sounds like a personal problem"' ,but you beat me to it.<grin>
BTW, any router I've used provides a direct line of sight to see the bit as it enters the wood.

Once you start using a router for mortises, you will want to kick yourself for waiting so long.
Lew
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posting some time ago in this group. Did you make your own, and if so, is there a link to it so I can see what you are using?
Dick
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"Dick Snyder" wrote:

I modified this design:
http://www.shopnotes.com/issues/090/extras/plunge-router-mortising-jig /
as follows:
Hardware:
All Stainless steel
1/4-20 x 2" HEX head bolts, flat washers and wing nuts.
10-32 x 1/2" flat head machine screws to attach jig to router base.
Runners:
Maple 3/4 x 1-1/4 with 5/8" dia x 1/2" dp counterbore and 9/32' thru hole for hex head bolts.
I refuse to use carriage bolts, the the counterbored holes above.
Assemble a washer under head of bolt and insert into counter bore and snug up with another nut.
Pour epoxy fairing putty into counter bores a little proud and let cure 24 hours.
Table:
1/4" plywood rather than hard board.
Get some 16x16 grid graph paper and glue it to the plywood with contact cement of 3M spray 77.
Align the graph paper with a major grid line running down the long (major) centerline of the plywood.
Working from the graph paper side, layout the slots for the 1/4" bolts, 2" thru hole and your router base(Mine was a PC-90).
Using clear packing gun tape, cover the graph paper to seal and protect it.
Perform all machining operations including c'sinks from opposite side to accept router body mount screws.
Remove 1/4x20 hex nuts used to sung bolts previously, while epoxy cured.
Break any rough corners with some 150 grit, then seal all raw wood with 3-4 coats of 1/2lb shellac. (I get better results than with 1 coat of 2 lb).
Let cure a couple of days and have at it.
You may not have picked up on it yet, but using the graph paper to locate the 3/4 x 1-1/4 runners, you need no other layout tools to get dead nuts, repeatable mortises, piece after piece.
The only pencil layout required are the end lines for the mortises and you will be able to visibly see the cutter come in contact with the pencil line.
Have fun.
Lew
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and will study my version for application.
Dick
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