looking for a decent plywood for a crawlspace "floor"

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Larry Blanchard wrote:

You're beating your head on the wall Larry. Several of us have commented on this over the years and it goes unnoticed by the offenders.
--
-Mike-
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On Thursday, April 28, 2016 at 1:40:22 PM UTC-4, Larry Blanchard wrote: ...snip...

Not nearly as simple to do in GG on an iPad. In fact, it's a real pain.
But I hear ya. Sorry.
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snipped-for-privacy@eznet.net says...

We are talking about "watertight containers". I used a jar as an example. There are other kinds that are equally watertight.
And yes, for all you know he's stored all his stuff in jars.
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On Thu, 28 Apr 2016 06:36:00 -0400, "J. Clarke"

http://www.containerstore.com/s/storage/storage-boxes/clear-weathertight-trunk/12d?productId 024301 and many more like them. As we;; as metal and plastic drums, etc, etc. MANY ways of storing things in "air-tight" containers.
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On Thu, 28 Apr 2016 06:36:00 -0400, "J. Clarke"

Nope. Once it absorbs all the moisture in the container, more will replace it.

If he's storing canned fruit in his crawlspace, this might be an idea, though the lids will most likely rust.
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On 04/25/2016 9:09 AM, Fredd Wright wrote: ...

As other said you don't "need" the vapor barrier but it would certainly cut down on the humidity thus keeping anything stored there less likely to suffer severe rusting or the like.
OTOH, if it really does flood and you're not going to prevent that from happening, it'd be a huge detriment afterwards as there wouldn't be anywhere for the water to go down through to be (eventually) absorbed back into the ground so in that case I'd definitely strongly recommend _against_ it and the plywood or any other wood solution. While PT is certainly better with respect to sustaining water and termite/other pests damage than non, if it's going to be inundated from time to time it just isn't suitable material for the long haul.
The pavers seem just the ticket; here they're generally available at cut-rate prices from the Waly-World or other BORGs "garden" sections late in spring after the frenzy has worn off and they're getting rid of remaining stock plus they'll often just let one have broken ones for the effort of getting them off their hands. I picked up a bunch of 1-1/2" 12x24 that were nothing worse than being two halves that way last year for some fill-in in an area in the barn where had never gotten around to finishing pouring a floor--work perfectly fine and who cares about a crack for such a purpose; they're not in a show area...
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On Monday, April 25, 2016 at 10:47:59 AM UTC-4, dpb wrote:

Interesting point about the flooding. Although the crawl space is about 3 f eet above the basement floor, when we get a hurricane, the basement fills u p to right below the ceiling so the crawlspace will be underwater. However , when the water level goes down, it will pour out of the crawlspace onto t he floor where the sump pump will pump the water out so i think it's a moot point if the water can't drain under the pavers.
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On 04/25/2016 11:01 AM, Fredd Wright wrote:

Ah, that's a wholly different geometry than had envisioned -- altho as noted in another comment wondered about how you envisioned washing it out.
What's the headroom and dimensions of this space; maybe you said but I've not seen. If it's a full basement and only 3' above its floor would seem to be nearly 5' or so which would make working reasonably easy. If it does get flooded I'd be pretty keen on a solid floor to simply stop the bulk of the mud after the events.
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On Monday, April 25, 2016 at 12:01:33 PM UTC-4, Fredd Wright wrote:

up to right below the ceiling so the crawlspace will be underwater. Howev er, when the water level goes down, it will pour out of the crawlspace onto the floor where the sump pump will pump the water out so i think it's a mo ot point if the water can't drain under the pavers.
Fredd, please stop leaking out details piecemeal.
Why not give us the dimensions and any other pertinent details so we know w hat question we are actually trying to answer?
Pictures are good too.
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On Mon, 25 Apr 2016 07:09:44 -0700, Fredd Wright wrote:

Hew, it's a crawl space storage area, not a patio :-). Just lay them down. But if anything you'll store under there could be hurt by dampness I'd put the plastic sheeting under them,
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On Mon, 25 Apr 2016 04:00:22 -0700 (PDT), Fredd Wright

First off how big is the area, a cubic yard of concrete will cover an area of 100 square feet at 3 inches deep. Getting it into a crawl space is the hard part (shoveling the old school way) or new school a concrete pump would make it easy. Finding a contractor to do a small job is also problematic.
Not being able to see the situation it is hard to come up with a plan.
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On 4/25/2016 6:00 AM, Fredd Wright wrote:

If you can make a cake, You can lay a concrete mud slab. :)

Same material, different form, and possibly more manageable in tight spaces.
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On Mon, 25 Apr 2016 04:00:22 -0700 (PDT), Fredd Wright

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On Sat, 23 Apr 2016 15:01:46 -0700 (PDT) jesus christ is risen wrote:

rethought my previous advice
raise house up and safely mounted on piers
then create a proper basement matching the house floor plan
then lower house and reattach
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On 4/23/2016 5:01 PM, Fredd Wright wrote:

After all of this discussion and weighing the pro's and con's I think you should move to a home with out this issue ;~)
I think it would be cheaper in the long run. LOL
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