looking for a decent plywood for a crawlspace "floor"

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On Monday, April 25, 2016 at 7:39:04 AM UTC-4, dadiOH wrote:

My experience with PT ply is that it will cup unless well secured. Pavers a re a great idea. Place over a vapor barrier such as 6mil visqueen on levele d grade. You could always spread sand or quarry fines on top of the existin g soil to make leveling more easy, but in your application, I really don't see where that is necessary. I would keep an eye on your local craigslist f or pavers. Around here they are pretty plentiful...
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On Monday, April 25, 2016 at 7:56:03 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

led grade. You could always spread sand or quarry fines on top of the exist ing soil to make leveling more easy, but in your application, I really don' t see where that is necessary. I would keep an eye on your local craigslist for pavers. Around here they are pretty plentiful...
I'm in NJ. 1' square pavers (or "step stones") are about $1.56 each. Not out of the question. visqueen will add about $100. What does the plastic do? What would be the downside if i just decided to level the ground and p ut pavers right on top of it? Do you put anything between the pavers in the cracks (i.e. like grout in bathroom tiles)?
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Fredd Wright wrote:

You don't need visqueen. You don't need anything under the stepping stones...just use the back side of a rake to level the ground to a reasonable degree. You don't need anything in the joints, they aren't going to move; the exception might be those along an edge if you push them while crawling around. In that case, just put them back. Or, cut some rebar into 1' lengths and hammer one into the ground at the side of and below the top side of each stepping stone (I wouldn't bother).
Somone mentioned that ply would warp. It will. So?
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On Monday, April 25, 2016 at 10:23:41 AM UTC-4, dadiOH wrote:

"So" will depend on how much warpage, the use of the space, what is stored on it, etc.
If there is a need to slide items to get them in or out or get to items behind other items, raised edges (or middles) of warped plywood could make that very difficult.
Excessive warpage could certainly make crawling around more difficult.
Raised edges will allow dirt and other debris to get caught. Even the smallest pile of dirt can catch weed seeds and allow them to grow.
Would you start with this to create the floor of a crawlspace? If not, why would it would acceptable if it happened a year later?
http://theplywood.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/wraped-plywood.jpg
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On Monday, April 25, 2016 at 10:42:32 AM UTC-4, DerbyDad03 wrote:

That makes me think that the plastic might be a good idea after all. if fo r no other reason, it could keep dirt and weeds from coming up through the cracks. Sliding things around may still be an issue with the cracks in the pavers, though. Especially since i'm not confident in my "leveling skills ". However, i think i can live with that.
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On 04/25/2016 9:47 AM, Fredd Wright wrote:

See my (barely) earlier note--in your original post you mentioned it floods occasionally. If you have the vapor barrier down, then you've made a swimming pool with nowhere for that water to go. I'd not even _think_ of wood if that's going to happen even infrequently...
--


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Fredd Wright wrote:

Dirt doesn't come up. Weeds need both water AND light to grow...does your crawl space get those (I hope not)?
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wrote:

Mushrooms?
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On 4/25/2016 10:42 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

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On Monday, April 25, 2016 at 11:32:03 AM UTC-4, keith snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

sorry, I missed the flooding part...in that case, might I suggest a sump pit/pump in addition to the above...
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On Monday, April 25, 2016 at 11:32:03 AM UTC-4, keith snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

btw, (IMHO) a poured in place rat slab/mud mat will cause the same drainage problems, if not more, than a simple poly vapor barrier...a sump pit/pump would make sense for for a poured in place slab as well... Just curious, where is the flood water coming in? From above or below the crawl space floor?
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On 04/25/2016 10:48 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote: ...

His original post said the occasional hurricane floods it so one presumes that's high water doing it.
The solid slab certainly has the same issue in spades as being no outlet altho I note in another followup OP says he had ideas of washing it out occasionally -- don't know where that water is to go but mayhaps there is a drainage built in specifically for the issue, who knows?
If not, certainly putting in a sump is a possibility but on a 5-yr or longer frequency probably just dealing with it at the time is sufficient if there were a collection point.
As almost always, there's more unknown of a situation than is known... :)
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On Mon, 25 Apr 2016 07:42:27 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

arond on it - - -
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On Monday, April 25, 2016 at 12:56:59 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I think I would look to store things in a place that doesn't get wet. Otherwise, maybe mount (with foam compatible liquid nails) to your PT plywood on 6" of extruded insulation in the crawlspace, laced together so it floats as a unit??? Good luck
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On Monday, April 25, 2016 at 1:20:57 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

on 6" of extruded insulation in the crawlspace, laced together so it floats as a unit??? Good luck
Sorry for the confusion. I can post pictures later when i'm home, but for now, the crawl space is on the side of the basement and goes around the bac k of the house in an L shape. There are cellar doors on the side of the ho use and, if i'm leaving the basement through those doors, right before i ge t to the doors the crawlspace is on the left. It's raised so the floor of the space is about chest-height. The space is about 4 feet wide and maybe 2-3 feet high and goes back about 10 feet to the back of the house where it takes a 90 degree angle left. I've actually never seen the crawlspace are a behind the house as i've never crawled back that far. Just planning on d oing the 10 feet on the side for now. As far as water draining when i hose it, there are plenty of holes and spaces in the side of the house where an imals have gotten in (my backyard goes right into a park) so no problem wit h drainage there. I'm planning on storing things in waterproof containers.
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On Monday, April 25, 2016 at 1:46:49 PM UTC-4, Fredd Wright wrote:

d on 6" of extruded insulation in the crawlspace, laced together so it floa ts as a unit??? Good luck

ack of the house in an L shape. There are cellar doors on the side of the house and, if i'm leaving the basement through those doors, right before i get to the doors the crawlspace is on the left. It's raised so the floor o f the space is about chest-height. The space is about 4 feet wide and mayb e 2-3 feet high and goes back about 10 feet to the back of the house where it takes a 90 degree angle left. I've actually never seen the crawlspace a rea behind the house as i've never crawled back that far. Just planning on doing the 10 feet on the side for now. As far as water draining when i ho se it, there are plenty of holes and spaces in the side of the house where animals have gotten in (my backyard goes right into a park) so no problem w ith drainage there. I'm planning on storing things in waterproof container s.
https://cnj.craigslist.org/search/sss?query=pavers&sort te&searchNear by=2&nearbyAreaV1&nearbyArea(6
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One thing my step father found out regarding waterproof containers is that when the water gets high enough, they tip over. So unless the containers seal air tight, it's a bad idea to store anything you can't afford to lose in such a space.
Puckdropper
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On 25 Apr 2016 22:57:41 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

they bob around like a little tugboat.
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On Monday, April 25, 2016 at 10:37:49 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I thought of that. I may try to figure out a way to strap them in. EIther way, i'm going to try to find some good airtight containers. We always have a couple days notice before a hurricane so i can always move them upstairs in advance if i need to.
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On 4/26/2016 2:42 PM, Fredd Wright wrote:

if there's enough air trapped inside airtight containers, it could condense with the cold water or cold of the basement and cause rot, mildew ,etc.
--
Jeff

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