Look what happened to this feller's workshop

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On 12/13/2013 7:06 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Use your parking brake as you should and lubricate as indicated the rust will not develop badly enough to lock things up.
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Don't know about your neck of the woods, but up here it's law that your emergency brake has to be working. Roadside spot checks especially in winter time often check for a working emergency brake. If it's not, a ticket with a fine attached is the result.
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On 12/14/2013 12:05 AM, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

In Corpus Christi TX, north end of Padre Island and lots of fishing there is lots of salt to keep things rusty. It was standard procedure to drench cables with WD40 to expel the salt water.
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Probably not the same type of salt, but our roads and sidewalks are heavily salted in wintertime for traction. It's not uncommon for the snow to temporarily melt away and the ground is still white from all the salt spread on it. I've always wondered what all this road salt does to the eco system.
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On 12/14/2013 2:22 AM, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

the Punic wars, they spread salt on the ground to destroy the land.
We voluntarily spread salt on our land.
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On 12/14/2013 1:22 AM, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

Well, you drive on the beach which is covered by a wave of salt water every few seconds. ;~) What does it do to the eco system? It turns it in to a beach. LOL
Then there is the salt air. Simply stick your tongue out and you can taste the salt.
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wrote:

If that were the case, Vermont would be one (little) beach. Well, close, but misspelled.

Don't lick the flagpole.
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On Sat, 14 Dec 2013 02:22:34 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

Why do you think the oceans are so salty?
We lived in Vermont for fifteen years. I'm very familiar with the whole concept of driving on salt. They use no sand because it'll freeze solid before they can get it on the trucks. In really cold weather, salt doesn't melt anything but it still helps traction.
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On 12/14/2013 12:08 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

And oddly enough you add rock salt to a hand crank ice cream maker ice to make it colder.
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wrote:

Not so oddly. The same reason, actually. Salt (ions) lowers the melting point of water.
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On 12/14/2013 5:04 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

fify ...
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I wrote:

"Leon" wrote:

Spend a couple of years driving in the Rust Belt and get back to me.
Road salt eats a vehicle alive.
Lew
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I grew up in Corpus Christi, TX. not unusual to have vehicles come into the shop with floor pans rusted out. So you are preaching to the choir about salt and rust.
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On Fri, 13 Dec 2013 23:14:17 -0800, "Lew Hodgett"

Yep. I had to replace my 2001 Ranger this year, even though it hadn't been in salt country for five years. The rear frame was so rotted out there wasn't anything left for the leaf springs to attach to. It got upgraded to a '14 F150. ;-)
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Rust is not necessary. In cold and we weather, the cable can literally freeze, i.e water infiltrates the cable housing far enought so that when it turns to ice the cable sticks. Working in fleet vehicle maintenance for the last 35 years I have seen it happen many of times. All our road call techs and garagemen carry propane torches this time of year. BTW, always leave them in the cab of the truck. If they're stowed in an unheated area they may not work too well til they warm up.
Try driving your car through a puddle a few times then parking it overnight in freezing weather with the parking brake set hard. While a particular car may or may not have the brake freeze, the odds are that some will under these conditions.
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When the game is over, the pawn and the king are returned to the same box.

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On 12/14/2013 9:55 AM, Larry W wrote:

I can see that being an issue but certainly not the rust if you exercise the cables regularity.
All our road

And in those occasions, you leave the vehicle in gear or Park when you park it. Not taking some measure to prevent the vehicle from moving is laziness.
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On 12/14/2013 11:15 AM, Leon wrote:

I remember one winter I had to go to a meeting in the evening. It was zero that night. The brake did not freeze but the oil in the standard transmission became so stiff that I could not shift until I let he car run for a while to warm the transmission.
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On 12/14/2013 10:29 AM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

Back in the late 80's, before the global warming fad, Houston used to get pretty cold. I recall similar situations with my 87 Isuzu Trooper. The temperature was "7" degrees F and that thing was a beast to drive when it got cold.
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wrote:

Try 40F colder than that. ;-)
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On 12/14/2013 12:31 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

I think you will have to agree that 7 is cold, damn cold for SE Texas. IIRC back when SE Texas was naming their small towns Pearland, Orange after their orchards, Galveston Bay froze.
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